Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

Japan Development And Redevelopment

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Walt Disney Co. said Tuesday that it is making plans to build an aquatic theme park in Tokyo, four years after the company scuttled elaborate plans for an oceanfront park in Long Beach. Disney officials said the park, tentatively called Tokyo DisneySea, will be built in Tokyo Bay and will be owned and operated by Oriental Land Co., the Japanese development company that operates Tokyo Disneyland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that an American city held a referendum on whether to build a billion-dollar dam and residents voted more than 10 to 1 against it--but the government refused to abandon its construction plans. Japan is in a furor over just such a scenario. It began Sunday when residents of the city of Tokushima voted 102,759 to 9,367 against building a dam across the Yoshino River on the island of Shikoku.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 22, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American firms are streaming to the Middle East in a frantic quest for up to $100 billion in construction contracts to repair war-torn Kuwait over the next five years, a rebuilding program touted as the most expensive in history. However, amid recent announcements by Taiwan, the Kuwaiti reconstruction effort may not even be the most expensive building program of the 1990s.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
The yen dwindles in value, but there is more important news from here, and it illustrates why Japan will never be the same. The purchase by Travelers Group of half of Nikko Securities, following Merrill Lynch's expansion in Tokyo, signals that Japan's closed financial and economic system--despite skepticism around the world--is going to open up dramatically in the next few years.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumiko Osawa, owner of a small Yokohama shop that sells packaged tea, feels almost hopeless about the future of Japan's economy. Stocks have plunged 15% in the last two months, land prices are less than half their late-1980s values and the population is rapidly aging. Osawa fears that Japan is headed for "depression." "I think the only ones who make money will be doctors and those who sell graveyards or run nursing homes," Osawa said. "We can't expect a glorious future."
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Meeting Scheduled on Economic Rival Plan: Economic officials will meet next week to review the impact of an emergency package to revive the economy. Finance Minister Tsutomu Hata will chair it. The group has met only once since the government adopted an economic stimulus package in March. The meeting will occur amid calls at home and abroad for Japan to take further steps, such as increased public spending or cuts in interest rates, to sustain its economy.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitsuo Kon and his wife have talked of buying a new home for the past few years. This month, they decided the time had come to make a move. They found a "bargain"--a 1,000-square-foot, $567,000 condominium under construction 45 minutes by train from downtown Tokyo. "Prices are cheaper than two or three years ago. It looks like it's affordable for us," Kon, 56, said after filing an application to buy the unit.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that an American city held a referendum on whether to build a billion-dollar dam and residents voted more than 10 to 1 against it--but the government refused to abandon its construction plans. Japan is in a furor over just such a scenario. It began Sunday when residents of the city of Tokushima voted 102,759 to 9,367 against building a dam across the Yoshino River on the island of Shikoku.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to boost Japan's image in environmental matters, government officials announced Wednesday that they will scrap plans to build a landfill airport near a rare stand of blue coral off a remote island in Okinawa prefecture. Junji Nishime, the governor of Okinawa, told a news conference that the prefectural, or state, government was responding to international criticism and vociferous local protest in deciding to move the airport project to a new site about two miles north of the original site.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Katsushige Aikawa was a 21-year-old farmer when he joined neighbors and their radical leftist supporters one long-ago morning to battle riot police come to seize land here for a new Tokyo airport. As rocks and flaming bottles of gasoline rained onto bulldozers and water trucks, Aikawa was among a group of about 700 protesters armed with bamboo poles who overwhelmed an isolated contingent of 260 police. Three officers were beaten to death, and Aikawa was one of dozens arrested.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumiko Osawa, owner of a small Yokohama shop that sells packaged tea, feels almost hopeless about the future of Japan's economy. Stocks have plunged 15% in the last two months, land prices are less than half their late-1980s values and the population is rapidly aging. Osawa fears that Japan is headed for "depression." "I think the only ones who make money will be doctors and those who sell graveyards or run nursing homes," Osawa said. "We can't expect a glorious future."
BUSINESS
May 19, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a shelf in Yoji Yamamoto's office sits a binder with the instructions for reproducing Woody Woodpecker, right down to the correct shade of Dai Nippon paint used to color his bright red topknot. That binder is one piece of MCA Inc.'s strategy as it moves into Japan--true Mickey Mouse territory and the most lucrative foreign market of the powerful Walt Disney Co.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. said it is making plans to build an aquatic theme park in Tokyo, four years after the company scuttled elaborate plans for an oceanfront park in Long Beach. Disney officials said the park, tentatively called Tokyo DisneySea, will be built in Tokyo Bay, and will be owned and operated by Oriental Land Co., the Japanese development company that operates Tokyo Disneyland.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitsuo Kon and his wife have talked of buying a new home for the past few years. This month, they decided the time had come to make a move. They found a "bargain"--a 1,000-square-foot, $567,000 condominium under construction 45 minutes by train from downtown Tokyo. "Prices are cheaper than two or three years ago. It looks like it's affordable for us," Kon, 56, said after filing an application to buy the unit.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Entertainment giant MCA Inc., which operates Universal Studios theme parks in Los Angeles and Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday announced plans to build a $1.5-billion park in Osaka, Japan. When completed in 1999, the 140-acre Universal Studios Japan is expected to rival Tokyo Disneyland in size, with a target of 8 million visitors in its first year of operation, Osaka city officials said. While Walt Disney Co.'
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Entertainment giant MCA Inc., which operates Universal Studios theme parks in Los Angeles and Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday announced plans to build a $1.5-billion park in Osaka, Japan. When completed in 1999, the 140-acre Universal Studios Japan is expected to rival Tokyo Disneyland in size, with a target of 8 million visitors in its first year of operation, Osaka city officials said. While Walt Disney Co.'
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Deep in the range of small mountains north of Kyoto is a small Buddhist temple where for the past 11 centuries monks have been praying to assuage the capricious spirit of the Kamo River, protecting the ancient capital in the basin below from floods. The modern successor to that tradition has taken on a new duty: fighting a flood control project he believes will devastate these wooded hills and fill the river with silt.
MAGAZINE
March 14, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, Leslie Helm is a Times correspondent based in Tokyo.
A sparsely populated, wind-swept hook, Shimokita peninsula juts from the northern tip of Honshu, Japan's main island, with a stark beauty reminiscent of the classical brush paintings of the 16th Century. Eagles hover over rolling pastures and swans bathe in quiet marshes. Idyllic but not ideal. With its long, cold winters and infertile soil, Shimokita is one of the country's poorest and most inhospitable regions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|