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Japan Development Bank

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BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | JAMES BATES
Just as Neanderthals were starting to earn some respect, along comes a new management book trashing their behavior in the workplace. Earlier this month, researchers at a scientific conference upgraded the Neanderthal's place in history with evidence contradicting previous theories that the prehistoric cave dwellers are not part of the human family tree. Now that comeback has hit a bump. A new book by Albert J.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | JAMES BATES
Just as Neanderthals were starting to earn some respect, along comes a new management book trashing their behavior in the workplace. Earlier this month, researchers at a scientific conference upgraded the Neanderthal's place in history with evidence contradicting previous theories that the prehistoric cave dwellers are not part of the human family tree. Now that comeback has hit a bump. A new book by Albert J.
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BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease trade friction between the United States and Japan, the Japanese government is--for the first time--beginning to provide funding to U.S. automotive companies interested in boosting sales in Japan. Responding to U.S. trade negotiators, who have sought to reduce Japan's huge surplus in the auto parts trade, the Japanese government has authorized its economic development bank to lend General Motors about $4.2 million.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease trade friction between the United States and Japan, the Japanese government is--for the first time--beginning to provide funding to U.S. automotive companies interested in boosting sales in Japan. Responding to U.S. trade negotiators, who have sought to reduce Japan's huge surplus in the auto parts trade, the Japanese government has authorized its economic development bank to lend General Motors about $4.2 million.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm from the government, and I'm here to help." U.S. Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher has been getting a lot of laughs with that line during speeches designed to encourage American companies to be more export-oriented. The audiences receiving Hiroyuki Kokado, a U.S.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | From Reuters
Japan is pressing the World Bank to shift its strategy for promoting economic development in the Third World--a move that could put Tokyo at loggerheads with the United States, bank sources say. They said the Japanese approach, which stresses a bigger role for government in the economy, is a direct challenge to the Western-oriented, market-driven strategy pursued by the bank in the late 1980s and championed by the United States.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1990 | S. L. BACHMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When 79-year-old Eishiro Saito steps down this week as chairman of Japan's most powerful business lobby, his successor will inherit a legendary organization, but one that's losing its luster. The Federation of Economic Organizations, better known as Keidanren, has gained widespread international recognition for the huge role it played in bringing Japan to its current heights of prosperity and economic development.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cruising speed for the Japanese economy means growth of about 3.5% to 4% a year. That is the growth rate Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa promised George Bush he would maintain when the President visited Tokyo earlier this year. But instead of being the locomotive to pull the world out of recession that Miyazawa promised, Japan's growth is falling far short of those targets.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she was about 8 years old, Rie Watanabe's mother took her to the local post office to open her first passbook savings account. Now 21 and a professional draftsman, she still parks most of her $3,000 in savings there. "It's convenient, and the interest rates are higher than at banks," Watanabe explains as she leaves the tiny neighborhood post office. Watanabe is one of more than 70 million Japanese who use the 23,600 post offices around the country as their local savings bank.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan may have forged an agreement that will intensify competition in cellular communications along the crowded Tokyo-Nagoya corridor. But Americans shouldn't expect a big "thank you" from Japanese consumers. In the latest trade dust-up between the two nations, it is Motorola and America that are the targets of Japanese wrath, not the companies that have been charging consumers rates four to five times those in the United States.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm from the government, and I'm here to help." U.S. Secretary of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher has been getting a lot of laughs with that line during speeches designed to encourage American companies to be more export-oriented. The audiences receiving Hiroyuki Kokado, a U.S.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1991 | HAL FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With help from a government pushing for citizens to devote more time to leisure, the Japanese are rushing to build Disney-style theme parks and entertainment centers. The result has been a windfall for American companies, particularly the Southern California firms recognized as world leaders in the design and construction of theme parks and their attractions.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1999 | DONALD W. NAUSS and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thirteen years ago, David Halberstam's "The Reckoning" explored the changing industrial fortunes of Japan and the United States through the rise of Nissan Motor Co. and the decline of Ford Motor Co. The book portrayed Nissan as a determined, customer-driven company that made U.S. inroads with high-quality, sporty cars. In contrast, Ford was depicted as a faltering, risk-averse concern run by accountants absorbed with profit and stock value rather than emotion-stirring vehicles.
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