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NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa opened a new session of Parliament on Friday with a pledge to help the United States overcome what he called "not a little confusion" in its economy and to transform Japan, the economic giant, into a nation that is also a "living-standard giant."
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BUSINESS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan avoided a near-death experience Friday when its stock market reversed course and advanced 2.7% after a drop to dangerously low levels Thursday. In a bid to keep shares headed north, the government announced a package of stock-boosting measures and an interest rate cut. The Friday rise might prove a short-lived relief to investors. Japan has no lock on jittery markets these days, but the stakes here in the world's second-largest economy are arguably higher.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were billed as the most extraordinary trade negotiations the United States and Japan had ever attempted. For the first time ever, two sovereign countries dared to demand fundamental changes in what had always been considered domestic matters immune from foreign interference. The two sides billed the "Structural Impediments Initiative" as a way to sandblast the stubborn impediments to trade in both countries.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Tuesday revised its national defense policy for the first time in nearly two decades, calling for a high-tech, streamlined military force and reaffirming the security alliance with the United States. The new policy, approved by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and other Cabinet members of the Security Council of Japan after extensive political wrangling, also spells out new duties for the force.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan avoided a near-death experience Friday when its stock market reversed course and advanced 2.7% after a drop to dangerously low levels Thursday. In a bid to keep shares headed north, the government announced a package of stock-boosting measures and an interest rate cut. The Friday rise might prove a short-lived relief to investors. Japan has no lock on jittery markets these days, but the stakes here in the world's second-largest economy are arguably higher.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) on Friday recommended a strategy shift in America's efforts to erase its huge disadvantage in trade dealings with Japan. Rather than negotiate directly with the governmental hierarchy in Tokyo to correct unfair trade practices, Gephardt called for tough countermeasures that would ultimately lead the Japanese people to demand reforms from their own government. Gephardt, a key congressional proponent of aggressive U.S.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Tuesday revised its national defense policy for the first time in nearly two decades, calling for a high-tech, streamlined military force and reaffirming the security alliance with the United States. The new policy, approved by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and other Cabinet members of the Security Council of Japan after extensive political wrangling, also spells out new duties for the force.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a provocative call to expand the nation's military role, a special panel of the ruling party has proposed reinterpreting Japan's strict no-war constitution to allow the use of military forces overseas for U.N. peacekeeping activities. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other government leaders appeared to reject the idea Friday, saying there should be no change in constitutional interpretation.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid expectations of firm leadership and clear policies, Kiichi Miyazawa, one of Japan's top policy brains, came into office armed with the most extensive experience in government and politics that any Japanese leader ever brought to the prime minister's post. But after five months, firm leadership and clarity in policy-making have yet to appear.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid expectations of firm leadership and clear policies, Kiichi Miyazawa, one of Japan's top policy brains, came into office armed with the most extensive experience in government and politics that any Japanese leader ever brought to the prime minister's post. But after five months, firm leadership and clarity in policy-making have yet to appear.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a provocative call to expand the nation's military role, a special panel of the ruling party has proposed reinterpreting Japan's strict no-war constitution to allow the use of military forces overseas for U.N. peacekeeping activities. Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other government leaders appeared to reject the idea Friday, saying there should be no change in constitutional interpretation.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa opened a new session of Parliament on Friday with a pledge to help the United States overcome what he called "not a little confusion" in its economy and to transform Japan, the economic giant, into a nation that is also a "living-standard giant."
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) on Friday recommended a strategy shift in America's efforts to erase its huge disadvantage in trade dealings with Japan. Rather than negotiate directly with the governmental hierarchy in Tokyo to correct unfair trade practices, Gephardt called for tough countermeasures that would ultimately lead the Japanese people to demand reforms from their own government. Gephardt, a key congressional proponent of aggressive U.S.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were billed as the most extraordinary trade negotiations the United States and Japan had ever attempted. For the first time ever, two sovereign countries dared to demand fundamental changes in what had always been considered domestic matters immune from foreign interference. The two sides billed the "Structural Impediments Initiative" as a way to sandblast the stubborn impediments to trade in both countries.
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