Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Education
IN THE NEWS

Japan Education

NEWS
August 30, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic decision ending an ideologically charged 32-year legal battle, the Japanese Supreme Court on Friday ruled that it was illegal for the government to censor from textbooks unsavory facts about Japan's wartime past.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 3, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Sweetwater, Tenn., will soon be atwitter with the children of Japanese executives learning in their native tongue at the site of a former military school. one of Japan's oldest Christian schools, said Tuesday that it is buying TMI Academy, formerly the Tennessee Military Institute, for $2.5 million and converting the 145-acre campus into a secondary school offering an academic curriculum in Japanese.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What is causing America's competitive decline and its incorrigible trade deficit with Japan? That haunting question has been studied to death by the experts, but one little-known statistic suggests that study itself--or the lack of it--may be to blame. Behind the $50-billion U.S.-Japan trade gap is a bilateral "education gap" now hovering at a ratio of about 24 to 1.
MAGAZINE
August 5, 1990 | BILL STEIGERWALD, Bill Steigerwald, a former Sunday Calendar copy editor, is a reporter and columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
THE OLD SALEM COLLEGE tennis courts on Main Street, Tomo and his Japanese pals Oni and Kai methodically slam low base-line shots at each other over a sagging net. A Sony boom-box blares a Motley Crue tape. Six local teen-age girls stand around smoking cigarettes, drinking soda and talking to several other Japanese boys. As usual, an after-school circus of 25 or so bicyclists, basketball players, skateboarders and spectators swirls around. But Tomo, Oni and Kai don't notice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Television is our biggest classroom, education one of our biggest problems. They merge tonight in the premiere of a PBS series titled "Learning in America," an ambitious, high-achieving five-parter that arrives at a time when the nation's system of education seems to be at a turbulent crossroads.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consider the trends: American math skills have dipped relative to the Japanese during a period in which the United States has also lost ground as an economic power. Educators and industrialists say there is not a simple one-to-one correlation between the math skills of a work force and economic competitiveness. After all, Japan's economic miracle and America's industrial decline are the result of many factors.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Brentwood-based property firm is developing the first Japanese-owned university in the United States, the most costly and ambitious project among a growing number of Japanese investments in U.S. college campuses. Lowe Enterprises Inc. is developing the school, Washington International University, in Loudoun County, Va., 25 miles outside Washington, on behalf of EIE International Corp., a Japanese real estate and investment firm with $7 billion in assets.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The school's name says it all. Jiyu Gakuen. Freedom School. This green, rolling campus, dotted with plum trees and fragrant blossoms, is an oasis of creative learning in Japan's academic desert of textbook drills, dry exams and mind-numbing memorization. Yes, these students learn math, science, history and other core subjects. But, on a given day, their science lesson may be bird-watching or a spontaneous hike through the woodsy, 20.5-acre campus.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miki Kurosu's most vivid memory of Japanese high school is cramming for his university entrance exam. For more than six hours a night, he memorized Chinese dynasties, kings and queens of England, the dates of the Napoleonic Wars. He endlessly drilled himself in calculus, trigonometry and the "almost Shakespearean English" tested in the exams. "Why do I have to memorize these small details?" the 35-year-old manager at Nissan Motor Corp. in USA recalls wondering in frustration.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome aboard the most conspicuous English-language classroom in Tokyo. It's parked in front of busy Shinjuku station, a Gargantuan double-decker bus painted in screaming yellow. Inside, it's outfitted with pink velour seats, a flip-down karaoke screen and glass chandeliers. Eight Japanese and the Australian teacher are in the back, introducing themselves as the bus takes off promptly at 1 p.m. for Asakusa Temple across town.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|