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Japan Elections

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WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Elections on Sunday are expected to return former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe to power, a hawk by the standards of restrained Japan. The nation's apparent rightward swing has spurred concerns that a victorious Abe might attempt one of his most controversial quests: undoing Japan's constitutional ban on waging war. Predictions that Abe and his right-wing party will win are a result of the Japanese right profiting politically from disillusionment with...
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WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Elections on Sunday are expected to return former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe to power, a hawk by the standards of restrained Japan. The nation's apparent rightward swing has spurred concerns that a victorious Abe might attempt one of his most controversial quests: undoing Japan's constitutional ban on waging war. Predictions that Abe and his right-wing party will win are a result of the Japanese right profiting politically from disillusionment with...
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NEWS
September 27, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto dissolved the House of Representatives today, clearing the way for the first general election under a new system aimed at empowering urban voters, encouraging policy debates and cracking down on political corruption. The Hashimoto Cabinet was expected later today to officially set the election for Oct. 20. The official campaign season will open Oct.
WORLD
July 12, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Yuriko Nagano, Los Angeles Times
Newly minted Prime Minister Naoto Kan's beleaguered Democratic Party appeared to suffer a resounding defeat in Japan's parliamentary elections Sunday, a blow that threatened to further weaken Kan's already tenuous monthlong hold on power. The Democratic Party of Japan won fewer than 50 seats, well short of the 54 needed for the Democrats and their tiny coalition partner, the People's New Party, to keep their combined majority in parliament's upper house, according to exit polls conducted by Japan's public broadcaster and all major TV networks.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
An 18-day campaign for a crucial election for the upper house of Parliament opened Wednesday with Prime Minister Sosuke Uno shunted to the sidelines. As leaders of four established opposition parties took to street corners to condemn a new consumption tax, "money politics," an influence-buying scandal and farm imports, Uno was forced to deliver his kickoff speech inside the headquarters compound of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
As a result of Sunday's election in Japan, Bush Administration officials said Monday they are concerned that Tokyo will be less willing to make concessions on key issues dividing the allies, particularly the most sensitive one, the U.S. trade deficit.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's governing Liberal Democratic Party, a conservative organization, was expected to overcome a Socialist surge and retain its 35-year control of the House of Representatives as voters went to the polls in a general election today. The polls were unanimous in forecasting a conservative victory, although the Asahi, Yomiuri, Mainichi and Nihon Keizai newspapers and the Kyodo News Service all predicted a relative setback for Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's party.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Paralyzed by a crisis of leadership and a loss of voter confidence, the perennial ruling party of Japan faced its first-ever defeat in a national election today. Voters cast ballots in a crucial election for the upper house of Parliament, with every poll in the country predicting that they will deprive the Liberal Democratic Party of its majority and hand the ideologically oriented Socialist Party major gains.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billions of dollars are wasted on public works projects awarded in rigged construction bids accompanied by political payoffs. Politicians help keep discount chains out of their districts to protect local shops. Bureaucrats maintain elaborate regulations and quasi-public companies to assure themselves employment when they retire. Such policies have been an accepted part of Japan's ruling triad of business, bureaucracy and Liberal Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Socialist party leader Tomiichi Murayama's election Wednesday as Japanese prime minister places new strains on U.S.-Japan trade relations and may derail Tokyo's efforts to carry out economic reforms.
WORLD
September 6, 2009 | Yuriko Nagano
Yukari Sato sat in her quiet campaign office and stared at the one-eyed doll that was supposed to bring her luck. The roly-poly talisman, known as a daruma doll, traditionally comes with blank eyes. While making a wish, the doll's owner fills in the left eye. The right eye is drawn when the wish is granted. That didn't happen last week for Sato, who experienced a crushing defeat in her bid for a second term in parliament with the Liberal Democratic Party. "I'm hoping to fill in the other eye four years from now," Sato said.
WORLD
August 31, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
The prime minister is accused of dispatching "assassins" to take on the "rebels," and he has been compared to a legendary 16th century samurai who burned a temple to the ground to kill his enemies within. He has invoked the spirit of Galileo Galilei, declaring that the Italian astronomer who argued the Earth revolves around the sun faced "forces of resistance" similar to the old guard of Japanese politicians who now seek to block progress.
WORLD
September 2, 2002 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ousted Gov. Yasuo Tanaka won his job back Sunday in a landslide victory in Nagano prefecture, sending a message to political opponents that residents of the central district want to limit public works spending, the lifeblood of many Japanese communities. In an election widely watched in Japan and abroad, the reform-minded Tanaka handily defeated five challengers to regain the clear-glass governor's office he built at prefectural headquarters after his election in 2000.
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satoru "Tiger Mask" Sayama emerges from his campaign van pulling on his signature pro-wrestling mask in the 90-degree heat and performs a spinning high kick. "Did you see that impressive blow?" a campaign worker screams over a loudspeaker. A few scattered claps shadow a sweating Sayama back to the van, mostly from his own campaign workers. "Thank you. Thank you. Vote for Sayama," the loudspeaker blares as the vehicle edges back into traffic.
NEWS
October 27, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's political establishment was jolted by the election this week of outsider Etsuko Kawada to the lower house of parliament. The 51-year-old ran as an independent, attacking collusion between politicians and bureaucrats, slamming irresponsible big corporations and pledging to fight for a government open to the people.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A heated debate over whether to give voting rights in local elections to non-Japanese is forcing Japan to confront the wartime past and some long-held assumptions about national identity, even as it creates a deep rift within the governing coalition. Yun Keun Ie, 52, has spent his life in Japan, is a product of Japan's educational system, eats Japanese food, thinks in Japanese, pays Japanese taxes and knows little about the country his parents left more than seven decades ago.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not be a revolution brewing, but a few mild gusts are blowing in Japan's "windless election district." This drab city, about an hour's bullet-train ride northwest of Tokyo, is the center of the strange political phenomenon of Gunma-sanku-- the No. 3 district of Gunma prefecture (state). Here, the same four men--three conservative Liberal Democrats and one Socialist Party stalwart--have kept a grip on this district's four seats in the lower house of Parliament since 1963.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this capital city of Tokyo's neighboring prefecture (state), a campaign debacle that could help Japan's beleaguered ruling Liberal Democrats was played out for all to see Wednesday. Four days before a crucial election for the lower house of Parliament, Hirotaka Akamatsu, 45, secretary general of Japan's No. 1 opposition party, the Socialists, gave a street speech for the party's only candidate in the first district of Chiba, with 1,457,781 voters. Twenty people listened.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese voters rapped their leaders on the knuckles Sunday but nevertheless upheld the status quo, giving the Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner an absolute majority in the powerful lower house of parliament. The results mean that Japan probably will continue to spend heavily to encourage a fledgling economic recovery, despite the country's soaring national debt.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If ever there was a politician whose days seemed numbered, it would be Kishiro Nakamura. The 51-year-old former construction minister has been convicted of accepting a bribe of nearly $100,000 in exchange for political favors. He was forced to resign from the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which had served as the launch pad for seven of his eight previous elections. He tops the "dump list" compiled by citizens' groups that are targeting tainted candidates for defeat.
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