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BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hotel managers, claiming that disruptions by striking workers have escalated out of control, asked a federal judge Friday to limit picketing to avert "blood in the streets." The judge said no. As Hawaii's first statewide hotel strike marked its seventh day, tempers were wearing thin for everyone involved, especially the tourists unwittingly caught up in the dispute.
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WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
  The old women, this time with hundreds of demonstrators shouting their support outside the Japanese Embassy in Seoul, on Wednesday marked the 1,000th successive weekly protest against Tokyo for a 7-decade-old war crime. The women's demands remained unchanged: Punish surviving members of the Imperial Japanese Army responsible for taking an estimated 200,000 young Korean women as sex slaves during World War II and pay governmental reparations. Those who fell victim to the Japanese military as young women, who during the war were called "comfort women," are still seeking closure.
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NEWS
November 9, 1989 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, WASHINGTON POST
Next month, the French ambassador's venerable chateau here will still flow with champagne and the ancient friendship brought during the American Revolution by the Marquis de Lafayette. The koi in the garden pool at the Tokyo Modern Japanese ambassador's residence will continue to grow fat and fancy, and the sake will be poured as freely. Even so, with the mid-month departure of the French and Japanese ambassadors, the parties and the people will be different in those bastions of embassy row.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
If the Lima hostage standoff cannot be resolved peacefully, U.S. and Peruvian paratroopers would plunge into the besieged ambassador's compound from helicopters and storm the mansion, a major Peruvian newspaper reported. The nighttime operation would take only seven minutes but could leave as many as 90 people dead as soldiers seized leftist Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement rebels and tried to rescue 72 hostages from the Japanese ambassador's residence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988
Consul General Hiromoto Seki is the new head of the Japanese consular district for Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico, officials announced. Seki replaces former Consul General Taizo Watanabe, who is now deputy chief of mission at the Japanese Embassy in Washington. Seki's arrival at the Japanese Consulate in Los Angeles marks his second American posting. He also served at the Japanese Consulate in New York from 1961 through 1964.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Peruvian government negotiator and a leader of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement held their first official talks on neutral turf in Lima on Tuesday, taking a long-awaited step toward resolving the siege at a Japanese diplomatic compound where the rebels hold 72 hostages. The talks were held before a neutral mediatory commission in a house across the street from the residence of the Japanese ambassador and lasted about four hours.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | From Reuters
Japan's Foreign Ministry has developed a color TV telephone system to improve communications with its embassies around the world, ministry officials said Thursday. They said the ministry plans to start partial operation later this year. Using the new system, Foreign Minister Tadashi Kuranari in Tokyo had a full-color, face-to-face conversation this week with the Japanese ambassador to Washington, Nobuo Matsunaga.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
If the Lima hostage standoff cannot be resolved peacefully, U.S. and Peruvian paratroopers would plunge into the besieged ambassador's compound from helicopters and storm the mansion, a major Peruvian newspaper reported. The nighttime operation would take only seven minutes but could leave as many as 90 people dead as soldiers seized leftist Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement rebels and tried to rescue 72 hostages from the Japanese ambassador's residence.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most employers could count on trouble from the authorities if they refused to pay time-and-a-half for overtime, failed to withhold Social Security taxes from paychecks and stood accused of tolerating racist and sexist conduct around the office. But American officialdom has done nothing to bother the Japanese Consulate in Los Angeles--where, employees say, just such practices have been in evidence. Shielded from most U.S.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Peruvian government negotiator and a leader of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement held their first official talks on neutral turf in Lima on Tuesday, taking a long-awaited step toward resolving the siege at a Japanese diplomatic compound where the rebels hold 72 hostages. The talks were held before a neutral mediatory commission in a house across the street from the residence of the Japanese ambassador and lasted about four hours.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Police guarding the Japanese Embassy fired at a small bus that crossed security lines, wounding at least two people. The embassy is about a mile from the residence of the Japanese ambassador, where rebels are holding 73 people in a hostage crisis that began Dec. 17. However, a police spokesman said the incident appeared unrelated to the hostage situation. Six people were riding in the stolen vehicle. Police confiscated two pistols, a shotgun and ammunition.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hotel managers, claiming that disruptions by striking workers have escalated out of control, asked a federal judge Friday to limit picketing to avert "blood in the streets." The judge said no. As Hawaii's first statewide hotel strike marked its seventh day, tempers were wearing thin for everyone involved, especially the tourists unwittingly caught up in the dispute.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, WASHINGTON POST
Next month, the French ambassador's venerable chateau here will still flow with champagne and the ancient friendship brought during the American Revolution by the Marquis de Lafayette. The koi in the garden pool at the Tokyo Modern Japanese ambassador's residence will continue to grow fat and fancy, and the sake will be poured as freely. Even so, with the mid-month departure of the French and Japanese ambassadors, the parties and the people will be different in those bastions of embassy row.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most employers could count on trouble from the authorities if they refused to pay time-and-a-half for overtime, failed to withhold Social Security taxes from paychecks and stood accused of tolerating racist and sexist conduct around the office. But American officialdom has done nothing to bother the Japanese Consulate in Los Angeles--where, employees say, just such practices have been in evidence. Shielded from most U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Police guarding the Japanese Embassy fired at a small bus that crossed security lines, wounding at least two people. The embassy is about a mile from the residence of the Japanese ambassador, where rebels are holding 73 people in a hostage crisis that began Dec. 17. However, a police spokesman said the incident appeared unrelated to the hostage situation. Six people were riding in the stolen vehicle. Police confiscated two pistols, a shotgun and ammunition.
WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
  The old women, this time with hundreds of demonstrators shouting their support outside the Japanese Embassy in Seoul, on Wednesday marked the 1,000th successive weekly protest against Tokyo for a 7-decade-old war crime. The women's demands remained unchanged: Punish surviving members of the Imperial Japanese Army responsible for taking an estimated 200,000 young Korean women as sex slaves during World War II and pay governmental reparations. Those who fell victim to the Japanese military as young women, who during the war were called "comfort women," are still seeking closure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988
Consul General Hiromoto Seki is the new head of the Japanese consular district for Southern California, Arizona and New Mexico, officials announced. Seki replaces former Consul General Taizo Watanabe, who is now deputy chief of mission at the Japanese Embassy in Washington. Seki's arrival at the Japanese Consulate in Los Angeles marks his second American posting. He also served at the Japanese Consulate in New York from 1961 through 1964.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | From Reuters
Japan's Foreign Ministry has developed a color TV telephone system to improve communications with its embassies around the world, ministry officials said Thursday. They said the ministry plans to start partial operation later this year. Using the new system, Foreign Minister Tadashi Kuranari in Tokyo had a full-color, face-to-face conversation this week with the Japanese ambassador to Washington, Nobuo Matsunaga.
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