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Japan Embassies Peru

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NEWS
January 30, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori will meet with Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto in Toronto this weekend to discuss the crisis here at the Japanese ambassador's residence where rebels hold 72 hostages, officials said Wednesday.
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NEWS
April 25, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a full-dress funeral for two fallen commandos Thursday, the triumphant tone of Gen. Nicolas Hermoza, chief of the armed forces, told the story of a political resurrection fostered by the military raid that ended Peru's 18-week hostage crisis this week. During the past year, crises had weakened the triple alliance uniting the military, the intelligence service and President Alberto Fujimori that is the center of power here.
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NEWS
December 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
President Alberto Fujimori gave his army and police special arrest and search powers by declaring a state of emergency in Lima on Friday, seeking to strengthen his position as a face-off with guerrillas holding more than 100 VIP hostages moved into its 11th day. Fujimori's action was the latest thrust in a diplomatic duel with Tupac Amaru rebels occupying the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima. Peru's Congress voted Friday to support Fujimori's policy of not negotiating with the rebels.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When soldiers die in defense of their nation, heroes are born. Lt. Col. Juan Valer Sandoval, who was buried with military honors Thursday, had a premonition of his imminent death. As the commander of a team of Peruvian army commandos awaited the order to attack the barricaded mansion where leftist rebels held 72 hostages, he wrote a farewell letter to his men.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, when an attempted military coup caused President Alberto Fujimori to flee the presidential palace, he reportedly took refuge at the Japanese ambassador's residence. The coup failed, but Fujimori's choice of sanctuary--reported back then by the respected magazine Caretas--reflected the special bond between Peru and Japan.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leftist guerrillas stormed the residence of the Japanese ambassador in Peru during a reception Tuesday night, taking hundreds of hostages, including the diplomat, Peru's foreign minister, several Latin American envoys and Peruvian legislative leaders. As many as 30 guerrillas armed with automatic weapons and explosives remained barricaded inside the residence in an upscale coastal neighborhood of Lima late Tuesday night, surrounded by police and soldiers.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | From Associated Press
President Alberto Fujimori's government defended its handling of the 2-week-old hostage crisis Monday, saying that despite the lack of recent progress it expects the safe release of all remaining captives. "We are certain that the good handling of the crisis will permit a solution preserving the physical integrity of all the hostages," said Alberto Pandolfi, the head of Fujimori's Cabinet. "What we want is a prompt solution.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Commandos stormed the diplomatic compound Tuesday where leftist rebels were holding 72 captives, ending Latin America's longest such standoff with a daring daylight attack that liberated 71 hostages and left one dead, along with two soldiers and all the rebels. The raid by 140 commandos of the Peruvian marines, navy and army began at 3:20 p.m. at the residence of the Japanese ambassador.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Archbishop Juan Luis Cipriani, a Red Cross representative and the Canadian ambassador met with guerrillas in a first step toward ending Peru's hostage crisis by setting an agenda for talks with the government. Cipriani said the hostages appeared to be fine. The meeting was seen as an important move toward launching the first formal talks between rebel and government leaders since guerrillas of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement took over the the Japanese envoy's residence Dec.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the Peruvian government of planning a subterranean attack, the leftist rebels who are holding 72 hostages in Lima halted talks with the government Thursday, saying they suspect that security forces are digging a tunnel beneath the besieged Japanese ambassador's residence. Nestor Cerpa Cartolini, the rebel leader, told reporters by two-way radio that the guerrillas have heard loud noises growing under the mansion in the past three days.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before they were cut down by the bombs and bullets of special forces troops in the Japanese ambassador's residence, the small platoon of leftist rebels who held Peru hostage for more than four months were walking ghosts. The audacious takeover of the mansion by the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, or MRTA, in December generated global attention that was far out of proportion to a guerrilla movement that had few fighters and minimal popular support.
NEWS
April 23, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Commandos stormed the diplomatic compound Tuesday where leftist rebels were holding 72 captives, ending Latin America's longest such standoff with a daring daylight attack that liberated 71 hostages and left one dead, along with two soldiers and all the rebels. The raid by 140 commandos of the Peruvian marines, navy and army began at 3:20 p.m. at the residence of the Japanese ambassador.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the besieged mansion with the columned facade reminiscent of the Southern manor in "Gone With the Wind," a 37-year-old Peruvian congressman named Luis Chang Ching wards off despair with a disciplined routine. Awaking at dawn, hostage Chang reads the Bible. He does push-ups and sit-ups, and jogs in once-elegant hallways now smeared with the guerrilla graffiti of the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Admitting defeat on "certain issues," neutral negotiators reported a deadlock Thursday in talks on Peru's hostage crisis and planned separate meetings with rebels and government officials. The negotiators did not give details, but the main sticking point almost certainly was the rebels' demand that hundreds of their jailed comrades be freed in exchange for the 72 remaining hostages.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Talks between the government and leftist rebels holding 72 hostages at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima, the capital, were scratched after the government representative announced he would not take part. The three mediators in the talks and Japan's observer spent about 10 minutes in the residence before leaving to make the announcement.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Peru's government has offered to let most of the rebels occupying the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima, the capital, stay in the country if they release all of their hostages, a Japanese daily reported Sunday. The Mainichi Shimbun quoted sources close to Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori and to the government's negotiating commission as saying the proposal was submitted during the last round of talks Wednesday.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Associated Press
Admitting defeat on "certain issues," neutral negotiators reported a deadlock Thursday in talks on Peru's hostage crisis and planned separate meetings with rebels and government officials. The negotiators did not give details, but the main sticking point almost certainly was the rebels' demand that hundreds of their jailed comrades be freed in exchange for the 72 remaining hostages.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
Leftist rebels released seven more hostages from the Japanese ambassador's residence Wednesday. The haggard captives left the residence about 5:25 p.m., accompanied by Bishop Juan Luis Cipriani and a Red Cross official. All appeared to be Japanese or Peruvians of Japanese descent. The latest release leaves 74 hostages inside the embassy residence. Cipriani, who has played a role in negotiations between the rebels and the government, walked the ex-captives out of the compound.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the Peruvian government of planning a subterranean attack, the leftist rebels who are holding 72 hostages in Lima halted talks with the government Thursday, saying they suspect that security forces are digging a tunnel beneath the besieged Japanese ambassador's residence. Nestor Cerpa Cartolini, the rebel leader, told reporters by two-way radio that the guerrillas have heard loud noises growing under the mansion in the past three days.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori's sudden visit to Havana on Monday was another dramatic episode in the 11-week Lima hostage crisis. But after the dismissive reaction Tuesday of the leftist rebels holding 72 VIPs, it was uncertain whether his meeting with Cuban President Fidel Castro amounted to a breakthrough or a sideshow.
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