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NEWS
June 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another triumph for direct democracy in a country that tends to be ruled from the top down, Japanese voters Sunday rejected plans for an industrial waste plant in the central town of Mitake and signaled demands for a better balance between economic growth and environmental protection. Underscoring the interest in the issue, 87.5% of Mitake voters turned out for the poll and overwhelmingly rejected the plant by a vote of 10,373 to 2,442.
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NEWS
June 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another triumph for direct democracy in a country that tends to be ruled from the top down, Japanese voters Sunday rejected plans for an industrial waste plant in the central town of Mitake and signaled demands for a better balance between economic growth and environmental protection. Underscoring the interest in the issue, 87.5% of Mitake voters turned out for the poll and overwhelmingly rejected the plant by a vote of 10,373 to 2,442.
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NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin abruptly canceled his impending visit to Japan, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other officials scrambled Thursday to put the best face on the diplomatic debacle, while public opinion was split over whom to blame. Miyazawa urged his country to "wait patiently" for Russia to sort out its domestic problems, while Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe urged people to "keep a cool head" and not respond in an "exaggerated way."
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin abruptly canceled his impending visit to Japan, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa and other officials scrambled Thursday to put the best face on the diplomatic debacle, while public opinion was split over whom to blame. Miyazawa urged his country to "wait patiently" for Russia to sort out its domestic problems, while Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe urged people to "keep a cool head" and not respond in an "exaggerated way."
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | KOZO MIZOGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They once lived in vast colonies throughout Japan. Now, only one Japanese crested ibis remains alive, alone on an island preserve. The highly publicized near-extinction of the snowy-feathered, long-beaked ibis has focused attention on the country's scores of other endangered species--and has prompted some soul-searching about the destruction of nature that has accompanied Japan's economic growth.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
The United States and 36 other nations voted Friday to permanently bar the dumping of nuclear waste at sea, but four major atomic powers abstained and it was unclear if they would observe the ban. The ban covers the 71 countries that signed the 1972 London Convention, which regulates the dumping of nuclear waste and other substances in the ocean, and each has 100 days to opt out.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noriko Matsuo is afraid to keep breast-feeding her baby. "To think that dioxin might be flowing out of me to her is horrible," Matsuo said as her 1-year-old squirmed on her lap. She also wonders if it's safe to let her 3-year-old play in the local sandbox while 38 incinerators within a 2 1/2-mile radius are spewing dioxin-laden smoke into the atmosphere of this leafy bedroom community.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | Kenji Hall, Associated Press Writer
When Koichi Goka heard rumors about the mysterious deaths three years ago, he started snooping around. What he found has put government officials on alert against a new plague, one that causes the limbs of its victims to rot and fall off. The sick aren't filling hospitals -- this plague is restricted to beetles. But in a country where it is not uncommon for collectors to spend thousands of dollars on a pet bug, Goka's discovery has become national news.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | MARGARET WONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Camouflaged in reeds and sedges, environmental workers quietly gaze upon a rare sight: dozens of black-faced spoonbills napping in the morning after feeding on fish and shrimp at dawn. When the large white birds with black faces and feet wake up, they wade in shallow water or tideland, swinging their long, flat, spoon-shaped bills left and right as they look for another catch in one of the few remaining areas of Hong Kong untouched by development.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarming conservationists, Japan is seeking to have three types of rare wildlife struck from the list of endangered species, opening the way for a resumption of limited international trade in ivory, whale meat and tortoise shell.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the mountains, they strip bark from graceful fir forests and gobble alpine flowers. In the valleys, farmers curse them for trampling fields and eating crops. An explosion in the deer population has become rural Japan's biggest natural headache. Now a growing group of wildlife experts say that they have the natural remedy: wild wolves.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after the Kyoto accord on global warming, most of the major industrial powers and developing countries are emitting more greenhouse gases than ever. Still, U.S. and Japanese officials say there has been incremental progress on diplomatic and technological fronts toward convincing many countries that it is possible and essential to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 2010 to below levels a decade ago--the goal set in Kyoto.
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