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BUSINESS
December 5, 1991
Japan Expo '91, the largest annual U.S. exposition on Japanese culture and commerce, starts a four-day run today at the Anaheim Convention Center. It is the first time that the 12-year-old trade show will be held outside Los Angeles. Nagao Masuda, chairman of Gardena-based Japan Expo Inc., said he selected Anaheim because renovations at the Los Angeles Convention Center limit the space available. The show needed more exhibit space. Last year, the show attracted 280 companies and 88,000 visitors.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Nagao Masuda sought support for a Japanese trade and cultural exhibit in Los Angeles in 1980, officials of the Japan External Trade Organization tried to talk him out of the idea for fear that the event would exacerbate the already chilly trade relations between the United States and Japan. But Masuda, a Japanese banker's son and one-time TV cameraman who has a reputation as a creative promoter, pursued his project with stunning results. Launched just after the September, 1980, airing of the NBC-TV mini-series "Shogun" fueled wider interest in Japanese culture, Japan Expo became a huge event that drew Japanese TV coverage as well as appearances from dignitaries such as Mayor Tom Bradley.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1991
Japan Expo '91, the largest annual U.S. exposition on Japanese culture and commerce, starts a four-day run today at the Anaheim Convention Center. It is the first time that the 12-year-old trade show will be held outside Los Angeles. Nagao Masuda, chairman of Gardena-based Japan Expo Inc., said he selected Anaheim because renovations at the Los Angeles Convention Center limit the space available. The show needed more exhibit space. Last year, the show attracted 280 companies and 88,000 visitors.
TRAVEL
March 3, 1985
Japan's fascination with high technology will reach fever pitch March 17 when the Tsukuba Expo '85, the International Exposition at Tsukuba City 31 miles north of Tokyo opens. It's a huge display of futuristic electronic gadgetry. Prime attractions will include a TV screen as tall as an eight-story building and a 30-foot tomato tree grown by researchers using light-absorbent optical fibers. Then there's a bullet train that floats on a cushion of electromagnetic force, that visitors can ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1985
A miniature Imperial Palace exhibit that appeared at the Japan Expo in Tokyo in 1896--complete with dolls resembling Emperor Meiji, the royal family and the Imperial guards--is among the rarest collector's items featured at Bea DeArmond's Doll & Toy Museum in Anaheim.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1999
Silicon Santa is busy in the workshop because it's holiday time on the Digital Coast. If you have a computer geek on your shopping list, what do you do? MP3s, DVDs, PDAs. . . . Are you confused yet? Fear not. Calendar Live made a list, checked it twice and discovered affordable and geeky gifts that are sure to entice.
NEWS
November 22, 2001
2 & 8pm Movies The fourth annual Three Stooges Big Screen Event includes rare Stooge footage and five Columbia shorts including "Horses' Collars," "Slippery Silks," "Oily to Bed, Oily to Rise," "You Nazty Spy" and "Hold That Lion," the only short that featured all three Howard brothers--Moe, Shemp and Curly--along with Larry Fine. The Three Stooges Big Screen Event, Alex Theatre, 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale, 2 and 8 p.m. $8 to $12. (818) 243-2539 or (800) 414-2539 or www.AlexFilmSociety.org.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Nagao Masuda sought support for a Japanese trade and cultural exhibit in Los Angeles in 1980, officials of the Japan External Trade Organization tried to talk him out of the idea for fear that the event would exacerbate the already chilly trade relations between the United States and Japan. But Masuda, a Japanese banker's son and one-time TV cameraman who has a reputation as a creative promoter, pursued his project with stunning results. Launched just after the September, 1980, airing of the NBC-TV mini-series "Shogun" fueled wider interest in Japanese culture, Japan Expo became a huge event that drew Japanese TV coverage as well as appearances from dignitaries such as Mayor Tom Bradley.
TRAVEL
March 3, 1985
Japan's fascination with high technology will reach fever pitch March 17 when the Tsukuba Expo '85, the International Exposition at Tsukuba City 31 miles north of Tokyo opens. It's a huge display of futuristic electronic gadgetry. Prime attractions will include a TV screen as tall as an eight-story building and a 30-foot tomato tree grown by researchers using light-absorbent optical fibers. Then there's a bullet train that floats on a cushion of electromagnetic force, that visitors can ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1989 | PEGGY HESKETH
Mothers bring their young daughters to the Doll & Toy Museum to show them the ponytailed Barbies they played with when they were little girls. Back before Mattel came out with knee-bending, hip-swiveling, disco-dancing doctor dolls, the children learn that Barbie once wore a poodle skirt and went on goose-stepping dream dates with Ken. Men, on the other hand, have been known to pay their dollar admission just to sit on the floor and point out to their sons the "real" GI Joes.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In ethnically diverse Los Angeles, where culture and cuisine are as tightly linked as the ribs of a hickory-smoked slab, there's something of a food fight brewing. At issue: a near-doubling of the fees charged to food vendors who sell their native specialties at ethnically themed expos at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
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