Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Foreign Aid
IN THE NEWS

Japan Foreign Aid

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan boosted its debt-relief program to 100% of the money owed to it by the world's poorest nations, the Foreign Ministry said. The announcement, just months before Japan is scheduled to play host to a Group of 8 summit of industrialized countries in July, affects loans that aren't part of Japan's Official Development Assistance program. Japan has already forgiven 100% of its Official Development Assistance loans.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan boosted its debt-relief program to 100% of the money owed to it by the world's poorest nations, the Foreign Ministry said. The announcement, just months before Japan is scheduled to play host to a Group of 8 summit of industrialized countries in July, affects loans that aren't part of Japan's Official Development Assistance program. Japan has already forgiven 100% of its Official Development Assistance loans.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top economic officials of the United States and its major Western allies stepped up pressure on Japan to do substantially more to spur faster economic growth at home, both to ease the Asian financial crisis and to avoid spawning wider trade deficits abroad.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top economic officials of the United States and its major Western allies stepped up pressure on Japan to do substantially more to spur faster economic growth at home, both to ease the Asian financial crisis and to avoid spawning wider trade deficits abroad.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan and China, whose relations will play a major role in determining the stability and security of Asia, are quarreling anew. Last year, China was upset with Japan for allowing a deputy premier in the Taiwan government to attend the Asia Games in Hiroshima. Now Tokyo is upset with Beijing for conducting its second nuclear test since Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama appealed to Chinese President Jiang Zemin for an end to such detonations.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Draft Budget Finalized: Japan finalized a draft budget for the coming fiscal year that slashes growth in defense spending, boosts foreign aid and delivers on a promise to Washington that Tokyo will stimulate domestic demand. The Cabinet endorsed a $573-billion budget for the year starting April 1, up 2.7% from an initially planned $557 billion in the current fiscal year. It is the lowest budgetary growth rate in the past five years.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government's pledge of an additional $9 billion to support the multinational forces in the Persian Gulf War was an impressive number, but it may be no more than that--just a number. Deeply entrenched pacifist sentiment in the political opposition and among the population at large threatens to either block the appropriation or strip it of real significance by limiting its use to non-military purposes.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | From Times Staff Writers
President Bush appealed to Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama on Monday to provide more help for the United States in the Persian Gulf, but Nakayama offered no new financial commitments beyond Japan's pledge last fall of nearly $2 billion. During a half-hour meeting at the White House, the President "strongly urged Japan to provide the maximum cooperation possible," according to a statement by White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater.
NEWS
January 25, 1991
The pledge by JAPAN of $9 billion more in aid for the U.S.-led Gulf War effort brought an angry response from Iraq's ambassador to Tokyo, RASHID RIFAI. He said it makes Japan an enemy and warned Prime Minister TOSHIKI KAIFU that if he sends military planes to the Middle East to help repatriate war refugees, the aircraft will be shot down. Kaifu also faces opposition in Parliament. Public opinion is divided.
NEWS
September 8, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan and China, whose relations will play a major role in determining the stability and security of Asia, are quarreling anew. Last year, China was upset with Japan for allowing a deputy premier in the Taiwan government to attend the Asia Games in Hiroshima. Now Tokyo is upset with Beijing for conducting its second nuclear test since Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama appealed to Chinese President Jiang Zemin for an end to such detonations.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aid Budget Is Restrained: Japan, the world's largest aid donor, plans to boost its official development assistance by only 4.8% in the 1994-95 fiscal year, Japanese Foreign Minister Tsutomu Hata said. It is the smallest increase ever in the aid budget, but Japan will still distribute $10 billion in assistance in the fiscal year starting April 1.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A thin ribbon of water spills quietly at the spot where the Asahan River once cascaded over a steep canyon wall as Siguragura Falls. The mighty force of the river has been harnessed by a hydroelectric project, built with a massive infusion of Japanese aid money that brought promises of power, light and industrial development for this impoverished patch of North Sumatra.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan, already the world's largest foreign aid donor, plans to boost its overseas assistance budget by 7.8% in fiscal 1992, Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe said. He said the government's official development assistance would total $7.6 billion for the 1992 fiscal year beginning April 1, and that the increase in foreign aid indicates that Japan intends to step up its international contributions in line with its status as an economic superpower.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exiled leaders of Iraq's embattled Shiite Muslims on Monday denounced the political talks in Baghdad between Kurdish officials and Saddam Hussein's government, baring a sharp split in the Iraqi opposition. Kurdish and Shiite officials, meeting in Beirut last month at the height of the Iraqi rebellion, professed unity on a goal of replacing Hussein's dictatorial regime with a democratically elected government. But the collapse of the twin insurgencies has broken the appearance of a common bond.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government's pledge of an additional $9 billion to support the multinational forces in the Persian Gulf War was an impressive number, but it may be no more than that--just a number. Deeply entrenched pacifist sentiment in the political opposition and among the population at large threatens to either block the appropriation or strip it of real significance by limiting its use to non-military purposes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|