Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Foreign Aid Middle East
IN THE NEWS

Japan Foreign Aid Middle East

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deposed emir of Kuwait pledged Friday to provide $5 billion over the rest of this year for the U.S.-led military and economic campaign against Iraq, and members of his exiled Cabinet urged Washington to use military force if economic pressures do not work soon. Secretary of State James A. Baker III announced Kuwait's commitment--split about evenly between support for U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | From Reuters
Saudi Arabia's King Fahd asked Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Saturday for extra aid for countries that sent troops to defend his kingdom against Iraq, Kaifu's spokesman said. "I want you to think of aid to Syria, Morocco, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other countries that are sending forces here," the spokesman quoted the king as telling Kaifu. Kaifu did not reply, but a Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Tokyo would consider the request.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is considering sending thousands of people to the Middle East to take part in the multinational effort against Iraq and debating whether to include members of the armed forces, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday. No decision is expected soon, the spokesman, Taizo Watanabe, told reporters.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu outlined draft legislation Thursday for a U.N. Peace Cooperation Corps that, if approved by Parliament, could provide a structure for sending Japanese military personnel to the Persian Gulf or to other international trouble spots. The measure provides that any troops used in this way would remove their military uniforms and assume noncombat duties under civilian control. They probably would not carry guns.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu outlined draft legislation Thursday for a U.N. Peace Cooperation Corps that, if approved by Parliament, could provide a structure for sending Japanese military personnel to the Persian Gulf or to other international trouble spots. The measure provides that any troops used in this way would remove their military uniforms and assume noncombat duties under civilian control. They probably would not carry guns.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | From Reuters
Saudi Arabia's King Fahd asked Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Saturday for extra aid for countries that sent troops to defend his kingdom against Iraq, Kaifu's spokesman said. "I want you to think of aid to Syria, Morocco, Pakistan, Bangladesh and other countries that are sending forces here," the spokesman quoted the king as telling Kaifu. Kaifu did not reply, but a Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Tokyo would consider the request.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration expects this week to finish the evacuation from Iraq and Kuwait of all Americans who have permission to leave and wish to do so, the State Department announced Wednesday. Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said that the final charter flight is scheduled for Saturday. About 300 Americans left Kuwait on Wednesday on a U.S.-chartered Iraqi Airways flight, she added. Tutwiler said Tuesday that about 1,269 Americans were still in Kuwait and about 170 were in Iraq.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly a month of procrastination, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Wednesday announced a carefully limited package of financial and other non-military assistance for the international effort in response to Iraqi moves in the Persian Gulf region. Kaifu and his government rebuffed repeated U.S. requests for greater Japanese participation in the current Mideast operations, such as a naval presence, minesweepers, military airlifts or the dispatch of noncombatant military personnel.
NEWS
August 21, 1990
Japan is expected to decide on additional measures to support international peace efforts in the Middle East after Saturday's scheduled return to Tokyo of Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama, who has been on a tour of the region. Japanese officials say new measures will include "more than just money," although added financial aid is nevertheless expected to be approved for Turkey, Jordan and Egypt--three nations which stand to be particularly hurt as a result of gulf tensions.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration expects this week to finish the evacuation from Iraq and Kuwait of all Americans who have permission to leave and wish to do so, the State Department announced Wednesday. Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said that the final charter flight is scheduled for Saturday. About 300 Americans left Kuwait on Wednesday on a U.S.-chartered Iraqi Airways flight, she added. Tutwiler said Tuesday that about 1,269 Americans were still in Kuwait and about 170 were in Iraq.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is considering sending thousands of people to the Middle East to take part in the multinational effort against Iraq and debating whether to include members of the armed forces, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday. No decision is expected soon, the spokesman, Taizo Watanabe, told reporters.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deposed emir of Kuwait pledged Friday to provide $5 billion over the rest of this year for the U.S.-led military and economic campaign against Iraq, and members of his exiled Cabinet urged Washington to use military force if economic pressures do not work soon. Secretary of State James A. Baker III announced Kuwait's commitment--split about evenly between support for U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After nearly a month of procrastination, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Wednesday announced a carefully limited package of financial and other non-military assistance for the international effort in response to Iraqi moves in the Persian Gulf region. Kaifu and his government rebuffed repeated U.S. requests for greater Japanese participation in the current Mideast operations, such as a naval presence, minesweepers, military airlifts or the dispatch of noncombatant military personnel.
NEWS
August 21, 1990
Japan is expected to decide on additional measures to support international peace efforts in the Middle East after Saturday's scheduled return to Tokyo of Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama, who has been on a tour of the region. Japanese officials say new measures will include "more than just money," although added financial aid is nevertheless expected to be approved for Turkey, Jordan and Egypt--three nations which stand to be particularly hurt as a result of gulf tensions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|