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Japan Foreign Aid Persian Gulf

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NEWS
October 23, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia may soon be able to listen to something more than the desert winds. Japan plans to send 40,000 Walkman-type cassette players to the troops as part of its aid to the multinational forces in the Persian Gulf, the Japan Times reported Monday.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
President Bush and Prime Minister Kaifu have much to discuss. Many U.S. political leaders remain upset over Japan's closed rice market, persistent trade surplus and what they view as inadequate support in the Persian Gulf crisis and the multilateral trade negotiations. For their part, many Japanese feel under-appreciated for their $9-billion war contribution, one of the largest among U.S. allies.
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NEWS
September 11, 1990 | Associated Press
Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato criticized Japan on Monday as "greedy" and "repugnant" for not sending more money or troops to the Persian Gulf to join American forces against Iraq. "They are acting totally within the character that they usually do," D'Amato, a New York Republican, said of the Japanese. "They are motivated by profit, greed and avarice. For them not to step forward and make a substantial financial contribution to this mission is unconscionable.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifteen freed American prisoners of war arrived at a U.S. hospital ship here Wednesday--thin, hungry and tired but generally in high spirits, military officials said. Some complained of mistreatment at the hands of their Iraqi captors, and three had been "cuffed around" so harshly they had suffered damage to their eardrums, an attending military physician said. But most of their injuries appeared to have been sustained in combat, officials said.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times staff writer
Until Japan recently pledged $9 billion in aid to the U.S.-led multinational coalition in the Persian Gulf, it had come under increasing fire by some Americans for not doing its fair share. To critics, Japan moved too slowly in announcing that it would join the economic embargo against Iraq. Then Japanese legislation to allow the dispatch of noncombat troops to the Gulf failed in a hail of national protest. And although Japan boasts foreign reserves of $76.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the government, the word has gone out to Japanese firms eyeing a piece of the Middle East reconstruction business: Don't act like a thief at a fire. Political leaders fear that Japan may again find itself the target of international condemnation if, after sending no troops to the Middle East during the Gulf War, its businessmen leap aggressively to seek postwar reconstruction spoils.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government said Thursday that it will send supplies worth $60 million to the multinational force in the Persian Gulf, but it added that Japanese companies are distinctly cool to the project. At a press conference, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry said no Japanese company involved in the effort wants to be named. Some companies refused to contract as suppliers at all, said Eiichi Hasegawa, director for North American Trade Policy Planning.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama is scheduled to arrive in Damascus today for talks with Syrian President Hafez Assad that could include discussions of Japanese help in transporting a Syrian armored brigade to the Saudi Arabian desert, a Japanese government spokesman said Sunday. The announcement came as Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu concluded two days of talks with the Saudi government and flew on to Oman for the last leg of a five-day tour of the Middle East.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
The U.S. State Department apparently headed off conflict with Japan when it agreed Monday that none of the $9 BILLION PLEDGED by that country for the Gulf War effort will be used for arms purchases. At the time the Japanese pledge was made last month, U.S. officials said the money would be used for military purposes. But the Japanese government indicated later that it could be used only for NON-LETHAL ITEMS or activities, such as food and transportation and other logistical needs.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifteen freed American prisoners of war arrived at a U.S. hospital ship here Wednesday--thin, hungry and tired but generally in high spirits, military officials said. Some complained of mistreatment at the hands of their Iraqi captors, and three had been "cuffed around" so harshly they had suffered damage to their eardrums, an attending military physician said. But most of their injuries appeared to have been sustained in combat, officials said.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the government, the word has gone out to Japanese firms eyeing a piece of the Middle East reconstruction business: Don't act like a thief at a fire. Political leaders fear that Japan may again find itself the target of international condemnation if, after sending no troops to the Middle East during the Gulf War, its businessmen leap aggressively to seek postwar reconstruction spoils.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
The U.S. State Department apparently headed off conflict with Japan when it agreed Monday that none of the $9 BILLION PLEDGED by that country for the Gulf War effort will be used for arms purchases. At the time the Japanese pledge was made last month, U.S. officials said the money would be used for military purposes. But the Japanese government indicated later that it could be used only for NON-LETHAL ITEMS or activities, such as food and transportation and other logistical needs.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times staff writer
Until Japan recently pledged $9 billion in aid to the U.S.-led multinational coalition in the Persian Gulf, it had come under increasing fire by some Americans for not doing its fair share. To critics, Japan moved too slowly in announcing that it would join the economic embargo against Iraq. Then Japanese legislation to allow the dispatch of noncombat troops to the Gulf failed in a hail of national protest. And although Japan boasts foreign reserves of $76.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government said Thursday that it will send supplies worth $60 million to the multinational force in the Persian Gulf, but it added that Japanese companies are distinctly cool to the project. At a press conference, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry said no Japanese company involved in the effort wants to be named. Some companies refused to contract as suppliers at all, said Eiichi Hasegawa, director for North American Trade Policy Planning.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia may soon be able to listen to something more than the desert winds. Japan plans to send 40,000 Walkman-type cassette players to the troops as part of its aid to the multinational forces in the Persian Gulf, the Japan Times reported Monday.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama is scheduled to arrive in Damascus today for talks with Syrian President Hafez Assad that could include discussions of Japanese help in transporting a Syrian armored brigade to the Saudi Arabian desert, a Japanese government spokesman said Sunday. The announcement came as Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu concluded two days of talks with the Saudi government and flew on to Oman for the last leg of a five-day tour of the Middle East.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1991 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
President Bush and Prime Minister Kaifu have much to discuss. Many U.S. political leaders remain upset over Japan's closed rice market, persistent trade surplus and what they view as inadequate support in the Persian Gulf crisis and the multilateral trade negotiations. For their part, many Japanese feel under-appreciated for their $9-billion war contribution, one of the largest among U.S. allies.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Iranian gunboats attacked a Saudi Arabian chemical tanker Wednesday in the southern Persian Gulf. The attack was described as another move in Iran's effort to apply internal pressure on the Saudi regime, which supports Iraq in the Iran-Iraq War. Shipping sources said that the tanker, the 21,032-ton Raad al Bakry VIII, was attacked by three Iranian gunboats at about 4 a.m. The tanker is owned by a Saudi firm in Jidda and was off the coast of Dubai at the time of the attack.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | Associated Press
Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato criticized Japan on Monday as "greedy" and "repugnant" for not sending more money or troops to the Persian Gulf to join American forces against Iraq. "They are acting totally within the character that they usually do," D'Amato, a New York Republican, said of the Japanese. "They are motivated by profit, greed and avarice. For them not to step forward and make a substantial financial contribution to this mission is unconscionable.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Iranian gunboats attacked a Saudi Arabian chemical tanker Wednesday in the southern Persian Gulf. The attack was described as another move in Iran's effort to apply internal pressure on the Saudi regime, which supports Iraq in the Iran-Iraq War. Shipping sources said that the tanker, the 21,032-ton Raad al Bakry VIII, was attacked by three Iranian gunboats at about 4 a.m. The tanker is owned by a Saudi firm in Jidda and was off the coast of Dubai at the time of the attack.
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