Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Foreign Aid Poland
IN THE NEWS

Japan Foreign Aid Poland

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu is scheduled to depart for Europe today on a busy 10-day tour during which he is expected to visit the Berlin Wall, endorse peaceful reunification of Germany and offer more than $1 billion in trade financing to Poland and Hungary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From United Press International
Japan pledged $190 million to Poland in immediate aid and credits Sunday and said it earmarked another $850 million to support economic reform and investment in the future. But visiting Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu, who arrived Sunday for a two-day visit, told Polish leaders that the $850 million was to be negotiated and was conditional on the participation and approval of the World Bank on how the money was to be spent.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a modest departure from its traditional pattern of distributing foreign aid, Japan announced Friday that it will contribute a $150-million loan to a multinational plan aimed at stabilizing the Polish economy. The loan is Japan's first firm commitment to providing economic assistance for Eastern Europe since Poland, Hungary and other Communist countries in the region began a recent wave of political and economic reforms.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared Tuesday that Japan should play an economic and political role in East Europe. Kaifu, referring to a $1-billion Japanese aid program for Poland and Hungary, told a meeting at the German-Japanese Center, "We are ready positively to support the democratization of Eastern Europe and help them bring about a new order."
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From United Press International
Japan pledged $190 million to Poland in immediate aid and credits Sunday and said it earmarked another $850 million to support economic reform and investment in the future. But visiting Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu, who arrived Sunday for a two-day visit, told Polish leaders that the $850 million was to be negotiated and was conditional on the participation and approval of the World Bank on how the money was to be spent.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared Tuesday that Japan should play an economic and political role in East Europe. Kaifu, referring to a $1-billion Japanese aid program for Poland and Hungary, told a meeting at the German-Japanese Center, "We are ready positively to support the democratization of Eastern Europe and help them bring about a new order."
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan called on Japan Wednesday to use its economic strength to help Poland "make the transition from communism to free enterprise." Reagan, speaking at a banquet hosted by a Japanese communications conglomerate that is paying him $2 million for a nine-day series of appearances, observed that Japan is entering a "golden age" with an economy that has "the power of a harnessed volcano."
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu is scheduled to depart for Europe today on a busy 10-day tour during which he is expected to visit the Berlin Wall, endorse peaceful reunification of Germany and offer more than $1 billion in trade financing to Poland and Hungary.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a modest departure from its traditional pattern of distributing foreign aid, Japan announced Friday that it will contribute a $150-million loan to a multinational plan aimed at stabilizing the Polish economy. The loan is Japan's first firm commitment to providing economic assistance for Eastern Europe since Poland, Hungary and other Communist countries in the region began a recent wave of political and economic reforms.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Ronald Reagan called on Japan Wednesday to use its economic strength to help Poland "make the transition from communism to free enterprise." Reagan, speaking at a banquet hosted by a Japanese communications conglomerate that is paying him $2 million for a nine-day series of appearances, observed that Japan is entering a "golden age" with an economy that has "the power of a harnessed volcano."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|