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Japan Foreign Aid Rwanda

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NEWS
September 14, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an agonizing two months of study, the government of Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on Tuesday finally approved sending Japanese troops to provide humanitarian assistance to Rwandan refugees in Zaire. The dispatch will mark the fourth time since the end of World War II that Japan has sent troops overseas, underscoring a new--although fumbling--commitment to involve its people in foreign trouble spots.
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NEWS
September 14, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an agonizing two months of study, the government of Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on Tuesday finally approved sending Japanese troops to provide humanitarian assistance to Rwandan refugees in Zaire. The dispatch will mark the fourth time since the end of World War II that Japan has sent troops overseas, underscoring a new--although fumbling--commitment to involve its people in foreign trouble spots.
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NEWS
September 13, 1994
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's Cabinet gives final approval today to dispatching 480 Japanese troops on a humanitarian mission to aid refugees from Rwanda at two camps in Zaire. It would mark the fourth time since the end of World War II that Japan will have sent its troops overseas. The move underscored a commitment to get involved in foreign trouble spots. The government sent three missions to Rwanda and Zaire to study conditions there before making up its mind to dispatch troops.
NEWS
September 13, 1994
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's Cabinet gives final approval today to dispatching 480 Japanese troops on a humanitarian mission to aid refugees from Rwanda at two camps in Zaire. It would mark the fourth time since the end of World War II that Japan will have sent its troops overseas. The move underscored a commitment to get involved in foreign trouble spots. The government sent three missions to Rwanda and Zaire to study conditions there before making up its mind to dispatch troops.
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