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Japan Foreign Aid Third World

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NEWS
January 13, 1988 | From Reuters
Japan may soon surpass the United States to become the world's largest donor of government aid to developing countries, a Foreign Ministry official said Tuesday. Japan has budgeted 1,348 billion yen for aid to the Third World in the year beginning April 1, the Economic Cooperation Bureau official said. At an exchange rate of 135 yen to the dollar--which the Japanese government uses for budget calculations--that totals $10 billion. The U.S.
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NEWS
June 25, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Significantly boosting its international aid, Japan announced today that it will contribute $120 billion over five years to developing countries in a move to demonstrate its "proactive stance" in promoting stability in the post-Cold War world. The financial package, approved by the Cabinet just days before the leaders of the Group of Seven leading industrial nations gather here for a summit, represents a 40% to 50% increase in bilateral aid over the previous five-year plan.
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NEWS
April 30, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Japanese officials, seeking to ease strains with the United States as Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone arrived in Washington for two days of talks with President Reagan, said Wednesday that Japan will provide $20 billion in extra funds over the next three years to the World Bank for loans to developing countries.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More Aid to Poor Countries: Japan paid out $11.15 billion in 1992 for official development assistance, making it one of the biggest donors in the world, the government said. Only the United States could have surpassed Japan's aid disbursement to poor countries in that year, officials said. Data for other rich nations will be issued late this month. Japan increased its development aid disbursements, excluding aid to Eastern Europe, by 1.8% in 1992 from $10.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1987 | From Reuters
Japan's offer to use a slice of its enormous savings to help debtor nations has drawn a cool response from Third World states at a major international conference on trade and debt, delegates said Sunday. A plan to recycle $20 billion of Japan's current account surplus over three years is a modest concession to poor nations, compared with the $90-billion surplus posted for 1986, developing state delegates said.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Sousuke Uno left today for the economic summit in Paris, where he will pledge more than $65 billion in debt relief and environmental aid for developing nations, a government official said. A Finance Ministry official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said much of the assistance would be in the form of loans, some with easy terms. The loans would be designed to help debt-ridden countries restructure old loans as a way to reduce debt payments.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Leaders of Southeast Asia's pro-Western alliance hope the U.S.-Japanese trade dispute will generate unexpected benefits in the form of increased aid to developing nations, according to Indonesian Foreign Minister Mochtar Kusumaatmadja. Mochtar said the trade dispute could have "disastrous results for the rest of the world," but that Japan is likely to respond to American pressure to stimulate its domestic economy and recycle its massive trade surpluses.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shrugging off two weeks of incessant criticism from government representatives and environmental activists gathered at the Earth Summit, President Bush declared Saturday that he is prepared to campaign for reelection as the "environmental President." On the day after his controversial nine-minute appearance before the 178-nation gathering, he called his environmental record one that "I will be proud to take to the American people."
BUSINESS
March 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Japan's most powerful business organization said Wednesday that its members will increase direct investment in developing countries to aid those indebted nations. The Federation of Economic Organizations said it had established two new semigovernmental groups composed of representatives of leading Japanese corporations to promote direct investment in the Third World.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Significantly boosting its international aid, Japan announced today that it will contribute $120 billion over five years to developing countries in a move to demonstrate its "proactive stance" in promoting stability in the post-Cold War world. The financial package, approved by the Cabinet just days before the leaders of the Group of Seven leading industrial nations gather here for a summit, represents a 40% to 50% increase in bilateral aid over the previous five-year plan.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shrugging off two weeks of incessant criticism from government representatives and environmental activists gathered at the Earth Summit, President Bush declared Saturday that he is prepared to campaign for reelection as the "environmental President." On the day after his controversial nine-minute appearance before the 178-nation gathering, he called his environmental record one that "I will be proud to take to the American people."
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Moving to assert itself at a major environmental summit meeting here, Japan is expected to announce the commitment of $6 billion to $8 billion in new environmental assistance for developing nations over the next five years. By contrast, the United States has pledged $1.25 billion over the same period--less than a quarter of what Japan is planning.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Sousuke Uno left today for the economic summit in Paris, where he will pledge more than $65 billion in debt relief and environmental aid for developing nations, a government official said. A Finance Ministry official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said much of the assistance would be in the form of loans, some with easy terms. The loans would be designed to help debt-ridden countries restructure old loans as a way to reduce debt payments.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Japan's most powerful business organization said Wednesday that its members will increase direct investment in developing countries to aid those indebted nations. The Federation of Economic Organizations said it had established two new semigovernmental groups composed of representatives of leading Japanese corporations to promote direct investment in the Third World.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Finance leaders of industrial nations on Wednesday questioned a Japanese plan for easing the Third World debt problem, while poor countries renewed their appeals for more help. Nigel Lawson, the British chancellor of the exchequer, told reporters at the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank that he found the Japanese proposal "a little bit elusive."
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Cabinet on Tuesday approved a five-year goal of $50 billion in aid to developing nations, a program that Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita will take to the economic summit Sunday in Toronto to back his pledge to make Japan "a nation that contributes to the world." The $50 billion doubles Japan's foreign aid in the last five years, although the annual average of $10 billion is only one-third more than last year's $7.5 billion. It would make Japan the world's leading donor; U.S.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Cabinet on Tuesday approved a five-year goal of $50 billion in aid to developing nations, a program that Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita will take to the economic summit Sunday in Toronto to back his pledge to make Japan "a nation that contributes to the world." The $50 billion doubles Japan's foreign aid in the last five years, although the annual average of $10 billion is only one-third more than last year's $7.5 billion. It would make Japan the world's leading donor; U.S.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More Aid to Poor Countries: Japan paid out $11.15 billion in 1992 for official development assistance, making it one of the biggest donors in the world, the government said. Only the United States could have surpassed Japan's aid disbursement to poor countries in that year, officials said. Data for other rich nations will be issued late this month. Japan increased its development aid disbursements, excluding aid to Eastern Europe, by 1.8% in 1992 from $10.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | From Reuters
Japan may soon surpass the United States to become the world's largest donor of government aid to developing countries, a Foreign Ministry official said Tuesday. Japan has budgeted 1,348 billion yen for aid to the Third World in the year beginning April 1, the Economic Cooperation Bureau official said. At an exchange rate of 135 yen to the dollar--which the Japanese government uses for budget calculations--that totals $10 billion. The U.S.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1987 | From Reuters
Japan's offer to use a slice of its enormous savings to help debtor nations has drawn a cool response from Third World states at a major international conference on trade and debt, delegates said Sunday. A plan to recycle $20 billion of Japan's current account surplus over three years is a modest concession to poor nations, compared with the $90-billion surplus posted for 1986, developing state delegates said.
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