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Japan Foreign Aid Ussr

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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to a comprehensive 20-year treaty with its promise of German help for reviving his country's shattered economy, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev got a less-welcome message during his just-completed two-day visit here: Germany's ability to help is limited. In the wake of the visit, a subtle yet definite shift of emphasis in German policy toward the Soviet Union has become clear.
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NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his first press conference as Japanese prime minister, Kiichi Miyazawa spent nearly an hour and a half Wednesday discussing everything from economics and foreign policy to morality with a spontaneity and frankness that won accolades from political observers. Miyazawa raised serious questions, for example, about the role that human rights issues should play in foreign policy.
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NEWS
April 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan will accept nothing less than Soviet recognition of its sovereignty over all four northern islands seized by Moscow after World War II as the price for economic aid and better relations when President Mikhail S. Gorbachev visits this month, a senior Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Wednesday night.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to align itself with the United States and the European Community, Japan said Tuesday that it will offer the Soviet Union an aid package worth $2.5 billion. The announcement, made by Chief Cabinet Secretary Misoji Sakamoto, amounted to a step away from Japan's longstanding policy of insisting that Moscow return the northern islands that the Soviets seized after the end of World War II as a precondition for major aid.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his first press conference as Japanese prime minister, Kiichi Miyazawa spent nearly an hour and a half Wednesday discussing everything from economics and foreign policy to morality with a spontaneity and frankness that won accolades from political observers. Miyazawa raised serious questions, for example, about the role that human rights issues should play in foreign policy.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to align itself with the United States and the European Community, Japan said Tuesday that it will offer the Soviet Union an aid package worth $2.5 billion. The announcement, made by Chief Cabinet Secretary Misoji Sakamoto, amounted to a step away from Japan's longstanding policy of insisting that Moscow return the northern islands that the Soviets seized after the end of World War II as a precondition for major aid.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the United States and its major economic allies approach a key decision point on how to respond to the worsening economic situation in the Soviet Union, they find themselves sharply divided over what course to follow. Unless they can unite behind a single strategy--and do it quickly--the Western governments risk squandering billions of dollars and missing perhaps their best opportunity to wrest long-desired political concessions from the Soviets.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | Reuters
Japan added its support Tuesday to the worldwide effort to help the Soviet Union cope with widespread food shortages, saying it will extend $100 million in loans. A Foreign Ministry spokesman said the loans will be made through the Export-Import Bank of Japan. Japan will also offer $3.75 million in food aid and additional medical aid for Moscow through international organizations including the Red Cross, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Soviet economy in chaos and his own political position increasingly precarious, Mikhail S. Gorbachev began a historic visit to Japan today with the aim of winning billions of dollars in desperately needed aid and trade to prop up the crumbling Soviet state.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Badly needing a diplomatic triumph, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev emerged today from grueling talks with the Japanese with little better than a debacle, having failed by his own account to secure a dramatic improvement in relations or a pledge of large-scale aid for the flagging Soviet economy. "We are yet to have that breakthrough," Gorbachev acknowledged after 12 hours of often acrimonious negotiations over the past three days with the Japanese prime minister, Toshiki Kaifu.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the United States and its major economic allies approach a key decision point on how to respond to the worsening economic situation in the Soviet Union, they find themselves sharply divided over what course to follow. Unless they can unite behind a single strategy--and do it quickly--the Western governments risk squandering billions of dollars and missing perhaps their best opportunity to wrest long-desired political concessions from the Soviets.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials suggested Friday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit here had opened the door to some economic aid from Japan, and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared that he wants to visit the Soviet Union as soon as possible. Diplomats said the trip might be made in August or September after an advance visit to Moscow by Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama following the London economic summit of seven advanced industrialized democracies July 15-17.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Badly needing a diplomatic triumph, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev emerged today from grueling talks with the Japanese with little better than a debacle, having failed by his own account to secure a dramatic improvement in relations or a pledge of large-scale aid for the flagging Soviet economy. "We are yet to have that breakthrough," Gorbachev acknowledged after 12 hours of often acrimonious negotiations over the past three days with the Japanese prime minister, Toshiki Kaifu.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cutting promptly to the heart of Japan's 45-year-old dispute with Moscow, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Tuesday called for visiting Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make a bold "political decision" that would recognize Japanese sovereignty over four contested islands.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Soviet economy in chaos and his own political position increasingly precarious, Mikhail S. Gorbachev began a historic visit to Japan today with the aim of winning billions of dollars in desperately needed aid and trade to prop up the crumbling Soviet state.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan will accept nothing less than Soviet recognition of its sovereignty over all four northern islands seized by Moscow after World War II as the price for economic aid and better relations when President Mikhail S. Gorbachev visits this month, a senior Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Wednesday night.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union is buying 15,000 metric tons of wheat flour at subsidized prices, the first time it has purchased anything other than U.S. wheat at a discount, the Agriculture Department said Tuesday. Meantime, a senior aide to German Chancellor Helmut Kohl flew to Moscow on Tuesday to discuss the logistics of distributing German food donations to help the Soviet Union. Kohl and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cutting promptly to the heart of Japan's 45-year-old dispute with Moscow, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Tuesday called for visiting Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make a bold "political decision" that would recognize Japanese sovereignty over four contested islands.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | Reuters
Japan added its support Tuesday to the worldwide effort to help the Soviet Union cope with widespread food shortages, saying it will extend $100 million in loans. A Foreign Ministry spokesman said the loans will be made through the Export-Import Bank of Japan. Japan will also offer $3.75 million in food aid and additional medical aid for Moscow through international organizations including the Red Cross, the Foreign Ministry spokesman said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union is buying 15,000 metric tons of wheat flour at subsidized prices, the first time it has purchased anything other than U.S. wheat at a discount, the Agriculture Department said Tuesday. Meantime, a senior aide to German Chancellor Helmut Kohl flew to Moscow on Tuesday to discuss the logistics of distributing German food donations to help the Soviet Union. Kohl and Soviet President Mikhail S.
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