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Japan Foreign Assets

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BUSINESS
May 25, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Remains World's Largest Creditor: The Asian nation kept its status as the country with the largest amount of overseas assets for a fifth straight year in 1995, the Finance Ministry said. Net foreign holdings reached a record $719 billion at the end of the year, it said. Assets grew last year partly because investors in Japan, where interest rates are at record lows, put money into foreign stocks and bonds in a search for higher returns.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Remains World's Largest Creditor: The Asian nation kept its status as the country with the largest amount of overseas assets for a fifth straight year in 1995, the Finance Ministry said. Net foreign holdings reached a record $719 billion at the end of the year, it said. Assets grew last year partly because investors in Japan, where interest rates are at record lows, put money into foreign stocks and bonds in a search for higher returns.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's claims against other countries--loans and investments overseas--surged by nearly half last year to exceed $1 trillion for the first time. The increase, announced Tuesday by Finance Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, means that Japan almost certainly will remain the world's largest creditor nation for the third year in a row, with $240 billion more in claims against other countries than they have against Japan.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
International financial power has shifted from the United States to Japan and a faster-than-expected correction of America's trade imbalance will not change the fact that Tokyo, not Washington, is determining world financial policy, USC Prof. Richard Drobnick told the American Chamber of Commerce here Monday. Drobnick, who serves as a consultant to the Commerce Department, said Japan "is replacing the United States . . . the way the United States replaced Britain more than 40 years ago."
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