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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990
Japan-based Soka University announced Thursday it has purchased 332 acres of land in Calabasas, more than doubling the size of its campus in the Santa Monica Mountains despite state and federal plans to acquire the land for park use. News of the acquisition shocked state and federal park officials, who said they were assured by Soka officials earlier this summer that no more land was being sought for the campus.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of tiny Soka University tried to reassure their Calabasas neighbors Wednesday night that concern for the environment would dominate their plans for a 5,000-student campus in what is now a serene meadow in the Santa Monica Mountains. But the neighbors, who had been invited to the Mulholland Highway campus to hear details of the plans, remained skeptical that the proposed expansion from an 80-student language institute could preserve the mountain setting.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps hoping to defuse criticism, the still-secret Japanese buyer of the landmark Riviera Country Club has scaled back its purchase plans and now intends to initially buy only a 49% interest in the Los Angeles golf and tennis resort. Laaco Ltd., the partnership that currently owns the club, said Thursday that the Japanese buyer has agreed to pay $52.9 million to acquire the minority stake. Laaco will retain the 51% majority interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan-based Soka University moved into a historic mansion in the Santa Monica Mountains three years ago with exceptional fanfare: a 75-member brass band played and squadrons of dancers dressed in togas or top hats and tails. Since that grand entrance, Calabasas neighbors have caught only sporadic glimpses of the language institute's clean-cut students, riding around its pristine campus on some of their 100 or so identical neon-colored bicycles or being bused to museums or amusement parks.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Japanese companies have agreed to acquire a majority stake in a shopping mall being built at Rodeo Drive and Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills, one of Southern California's best-known intersections, it was announced Monday. The exact price for the 135,000-square-foot complex, known as Two Rodeo Drive, was not revealed. But the sellers said the amount was "well over $200 million," a high price for retail space even by Beverly Hills standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of tiny Soka University tried to reassure their Calabasas neighbors Wednesday night that concern for the environment would dominate their plans for a 5,000-student campus in what is now a serene meadow in the Santa Monica Mountains. But the neighbors, who had been invited to the Mulholland Highway campus to hear details of the plans, remained skeptical that the proposed expansion from an 80-student language institute could preserve the mountain setting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan-based Soka University moved into a historic mansion in the Santa Monica Mountains three years ago with exceptional fanfare: a 75-member brass band played and squadrons of dancers dressed in togas or top hats and tails. Since that grand entrance, Calabasas neighbors have caught only sporadic glimpses of the language institute's clean-cut students, riding around its pristine campus on some of their 100 or so identical neon-colored bicycles or being bused to museums or amusement parks.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After months of secrecy, Marukin Shoji Ltd., a Japanese real estate company, emerged Friday as the mysterious investor in the Riviera Country Club, the landmark 168-acre golf and tennis resort in Pacific Palisades. Noboru Watanabe, chairman of Marukin USA, signed a formal agreement to pay, as previously disclosed, $52.9 million for a 49% interest in Riviera Associates, a new partnership formed with Laaco Ltd., the club's current owner. Laaco will retain the majority stake in the new partnership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990
Japan-based Soka University announced Thursday it has purchased 332 acres of land in Calabasas, more than doubling the size of its campus in the Santa Monica Mountains despite state and federal plans to acquire the land for park use. News of the acquisition shocked state and federal park officials, who said they were assured by Soka officials earlier this summer that no more land was being sought for the campus.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Japanese companies have agreed to acquire a majority stake in a shopping mall being built at Rodeo Drive and Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills, one of Southern California's best-known intersections, it was announced Monday. The exact price for the 135,000-square-foot complex, known as Two Rodeo Drive, was not revealed. But the sellers said the amount was "well over $200 million," a high price for retail space even by Beverly Hills standards.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
After months of secrecy, Marukin Shoji Ltd., a Japanese real estate company, emerged Friday as the mysterious investor in the Riviera Country Club, the landmark 168-acre golf and tennis resort in Pacific Palisades. Noboru Watanabe, chairman of Marukin USA, signed a formal agreement to pay, as previously disclosed, $52.9 million for a 49% interest in Riviera Associates, a new partnership formed with Laaco Ltd., the club's current owner. Laaco will retain the majority stake in the new partnership.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Perhaps hoping to defuse criticism, the still-secret Japanese buyer of the landmark Riviera Country Club has scaled back its purchase plans and now intends to initially buy only a 49% interest in the Los Angeles golf and tennis resort. Laaco Ltd., the partnership that currently owns the club, said Thursday that the Japanese buyer has agreed to pay $52.9 million to acquire the minority stake. Laaco will retain the 51% majority interest.
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