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Japan Foreign Investments Mexico

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BUSINESS
May 31, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining the headlong rush of Asian television manufacturers to Baja California facilities, Mitsubishi Electronics America disclosed plans Tuesday to add nearly 1,000 jobs in the border town of Mexicali, Mexico, to make components for its line of large-screen televisions.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joining the headlong rush of Asian television manufacturers to Baja California facilities, Mitsubishi Electronics America disclosed plans Tuesday to add nearly 1,000 jobs in the border town of Mexicali, Mexico, to make components for its line of large-screen televisions.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Joining the march of Asian electronics giants to Tijuana, Kyocera International has begun construction on the first part of a planned 400,000-square-foot manufacturing complex near the Mexican city's international airport. The Japanese-owned company, which makes ceramics used with semiconductors, expects to begin production there in October. Over the last two years such Japanese companies as Sony, Hitachi, Matsushita, Canon and Sanyo have relocated or expanded operations in Tijuana.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese consumer electronics giant JVC will begin construction Thursday on a $36-million television manufacturing complex in Tijuana, joining half a dozen other Asian TV makers already there. The plant will initially employ about 500, JVC said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, when Detroit was the world's undisputed car-making capital and Canadians streamed through the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel every day to work in its factories, Mexico had virtually no automotive industry. Decades of government-industry coordination that rivals the cooperation among Japanese leaders and business executives have changed that scenario.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Carlos Salinas de Gortari took office five years ago, he pledged to make Mexico a Pacific Rim nation, economically as well as geographically. During his term, Mexico joined influential Pacific Rim organizations, culminating last month in the country's inclusion in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. But Mexico's relations with Asia have been disappointing in one crucial respect: investment.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Casio Computer, the digital watch, calculator and computer manufacturer, is the latest Japanese company to see the advantage of U.S. trade agreements that encourage the location of manufacturing plant just over the U.S. border in Mexico. Casio has signed a letter of intent to buy nearly 14 acres of land in a Tijuana business park just south of the U.S.-Mexico border, and developers say Casio will build a maquiladora, as the foreign-operated assembly plants in Mexico are called.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today marks the beginning of Steve D. Stewart's 13th year with Hitachi, but the quality control manager has little cause to celebrate. His employer, Hitachi Home Electronics America Inc., announced plans Wednesday to close its 325,000-square-foot Anaheim plant by year's end and relocate its assembly operation to Mexico in a cost-cutting move.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan Corp. has agreed to invest $1 billion during the next three years to expand its vehicle manufacturing operations in Aguascalientes, Mexican trade officials announced Tuesday. The commitment represents the largest single foreign investment package in Mexico unveiled during 1989, said Gregory Leddy, a New York-based spokesman for the Mexican Secretariat of Trade and Industrial Development. Earlier this year, Leddy noted, Ford Motor Co.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1987
Kyocera International Inc., the San Diego-based American subsidiary of the Japanese high-technology conglomerate Kyocera Corp., has signed an agreement to purchase 26 acres of vacant land near Tijuana's airport for future development of the plants. Terms of the sale were not disclosed. KII, a manufacturer of ceramic semiconductor packages, employs 2,300 workers in the United States, including 1,600 in San Diego.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Carlos Salinas de Gortari took office five years ago, he pledged to make Mexico a Pacific Rim nation, economically as well as geographically. During his term, Mexico joined influential Pacific Rim organizations, culminating last month in the country's inclusion in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. But Mexico's relations with Asia have been disappointing in one crucial respect: investment.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago, when Detroit was the world's undisputed car-making capital and Canadians streamed through the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel every day to work in its factories, Mexico had virtually no automotive industry. Decades of government-industry coordination that rivals the cooperation among Japanese leaders and business executives have changed that scenario.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today marks the beginning of Steve D. Stewart's 13th year with Hitachi, but the quality control manager has little cause to celebrate. His employer, Hitachi Home Electronics America Inc., announced plans Wednesday to close its 325,000-square-foot Anaheim plant by year's end and relocate its assembly operation to Mexico in a cost-cutting move.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan Corp. has agreed to invest $1 billion during the next three years to expand its vehicle manufacturing operations in Aguascalientes, Mexican trade officials announced Tuesday. The commitment represents the largest single foreign investment package in Mexico unveiled during 1989, said Gregory Leddy, a New York-based spokesman for the Mexican Secretariat of Trade and Industrial Development. Earlier this year, Leddy noted, Ford Motor Co.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of Japan and Mexico pledged Tuesday to work closely to foster economic relations, underscoring Japan's emerging role as a key player in Third World debt relief and environmental aid. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu offered nothing new in the way of concrete assistance in his two-hour meeting with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Where the Land of the Rising Sun meets the Aztec Sol , the future is very bright. At least that's the message that Mexican officials hope Japanese Prime Minister Toshika Kaifu will take back to Japanese investors this week from his visit to Mexico. With its new regulations liberalizing foreign investment, the administration of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has been aggressively courting Japanese investment in tourism, petrochemical, assembly plant and other industries.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese consumer electronics giant JVC will begin construction Thursday on a $36-million television manufacturing complex in Tijuana, joining half a dozen other Asian TV makers already there. The plant will initially employ about 500, JVC said.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of Japan and Mexico pledged Tuesday to work closely to foster economic relations, underscoring Japan's emerging role as a key player in Third World debt relief and environmental aid. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu offered nothing new in the way of concrete assistance in his two-hour meeting with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Casio Computer, the digital watch, calculator and computer manufacturer, is the latest Japanese company to see the advantage of U.S. trade agreements that encourage the location of manufacturing plant just over the U.S. border in Mexico. Casio has signed a letter of intent to buy nearly 14 acres of land in a Tijuana business park just south of the U.S.-Mexico border, and developers say Casio will build a maquiladora, as the foreign-operated assembly plants in Mexico are called.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1988 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Joining the march of Asian electronics giants to Tijuana, Kyocera International has begun construction on the first part of a planned 400,000-square-foot manufacturing complex near the Mexican city's international airport. The Japanese-owned company, which makes ceramics used with semiconductors, expects to begin production there in October. Over the last two years such Japanese companies as Sony, Hitachi, Matsushita, Canon and Sanyo have relocated or expanded operations in Tijuana.
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