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Japan Foreign Investments Ussr

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese businessmen are extending a tentative lifeline to the ailing Soviet economy even though their government has avoided wider ties pending resolution of a long-standing territorial dispute. A number of companies have signed contracts or worked behind the scenes to help the Soviets in their herculean task of converting to a market-oriented economy.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakup of the Soviet Union may create business opportunities in Russia and other republics over the long term, but Japanese investors say that for the time being political instability has actually increased the risks of making an investment. "Over the short term there is going to be a lot of confusion," said Takashi Murakami, head of the economic studies division of the Japan Assn.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breakup of the Soviet Union may create business opportunities in Russia and other republics over the long term, but Japanese investors say that for the time being political instability has actually increased the risks of making an investment. "Over the short term there is going to be a lot of confusion," said Takashi Murakami, head of the economic studies division of the Japan Assn.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese businessmen are extending a tentative lifeline to the ailing Soviet economy even though their government has avoided wider ties pending resolution of a long-standing territorial dispute. A number of companies have signed contracts or worked behind the scenes to help the Soviets in their herculean task of converting to a market-oriented economy.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1988 | CHARLES POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp., along with a Japanese and two Italian multinational firms, signed a letter of intent Wednesday that is expected to lead to a $6-billion joint venture petrochemical project with the Soviet Union. Armand Hammer, chairman of Los Angeles-based Occidental, described the joint venture plan, first disclosed last November, as the largest to be proposed here and said it was part of Soviet leader Mikhail S.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
American and Japanese entrepreneurs are making deals in the desolate Soviet Far East, best known to outsiders as the area where border gunners shot down a Korean Airlines jumbo jet. Most foreign investment in the resource-rich, lightly populated region is still in the start-up stage. Moscow sees foreign trade and foreign investment as ways to boost the Soviet economy, although so far no large-scale foreign projects have been started in the Soviet sector of the booming Pacific Basin.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | From United Press International
A Japanese television producer, frustrated in his attempts to communicate with counterparts in the Soviet East Asian capital of Vladivostok, gave two fax machines to the local television station in July. It was a nice try, but Hiroshi Kikuchi's gift failed to remedy the situation. When he returned to Japan, he found telephone lines were so poor he could not get through to his fax machines.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union signed a preliminary agreement Friday with a Japanese-led consortium in a deal that could lead to the building of a huge petrochemical complex in western Siberia. The project, if completed, would be one of the largest joint ventures the Soviets have entered into with foreign companies since liberalized regulations were implemented last year to make such undertakings possible. Mitsubishi Corp.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | From United Press International
A Japanese television producer, frustrated in his attempts to communicate with counterparts in the Soviet East Asian capital of Vladivostok, gave two fax machines to the local television station in July. It was a nice try, but Hiroshi Kikuchi's gift failed to remedy the situation. When he returned to Japan, he found telephone lines were so poor he could not get through to his fax machines.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
American and Japanese entrepreneurs are making deals in the desolate Soviet Far East, best known to outsiders as the area where border gunners shot down a Korean Airlines jumbo jet. Most foreign investment in the resource-rich, lightly populated region is still in the start-up stage. Moscow sees foreign trade and foreign investment as ways to boost the Soviet economy, although so far no large-scale foreign projects have been started in the Soviet sector of the booming Pacific Basin.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1988 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union signed a preliminary agreement Friday with a Japanese-led consortium in a deal that could lead to the building of a huge petrochemical complex in western Siberia. The project, if completed, would be one of the largest joint ventures the Soviets have entered into with foreign companies since liberalized regulations were implemented last year to make such undertakings possible. Mitsubishi Corp.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1988 | CHARLES POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp., along with a Japanese and two Italian multinational firms, signed a letter of intent Wednesday that is expected to lead to a $6-billion joint venture petrochemical project with the Soviet Union. Armand Hammer, chairman of Los Angeles-based Occidental, described the joint venture plan, first disclosed last November, as the largest to be proposed here and said it was part of Soviet leader Mikhail S.
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