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July 21, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They steal the children's bicycles and hang around the telephone boxes," says Hachiro Nakano while slurping down a lunch of cold noodles. "They have dark skin," she adds sliding four fingers down her cheeks. "It gives me the creeps." Says a salesclerk at a 7-Eleven convenience store, "They are always in the park on weekends, so I walk around the side to avoid them."
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NEWS
July 21, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They steal the children's bicycles and hang around the telephone boxes," says Hachiro Nakano while slurping down a lunch of cold noodles. "They have dark skin," she adds sliding four fingers down her cheeks. "It gives me the creeps." Says a salesclerk at a 7-Eleven convenience store, "They are always in the park on weekends, so I walk around the side to avoid them."
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NEWS
October 31, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exclusivist Japan suddenly has become a beacon of hope for tens of thousands of poor Asians. A year ago, the number of illegal foreign workers in Japan was about 100,000. But now, "it may be as many as 300,000," said Mitsuaki Yoshimen, who heads a Labor Ministry unit dealing with foreign workers. "We don't know what the real number is. It keeps increasing steadily." Police are arresting and deporting illegal foreign workers at a rate of more than 18,000 a year.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exclusivist Japan suddenly has become a beacon of hope for tens of thousands of poor Asians. A year ago, the number of illegal foreign workers in Japan was about 100,000. But now, "it may be as many as 300,000," said Mitsuaki Yoshimen, who heads a Labor Ministry unit dealing with foreign workers. "We don't know what the real number is. It keeps increasing steadily." Police are arresting and deporting illegal foreign workers at a rate of more than 18,000 a year.
OPINION
May 5, 1996 | Wayne A. Cornelius, Wayne A. Cornelius is director of studies in UC-San Diego's Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. He is currently conducting comparative research on the utilization of immigrant labor in San Diego and a Japanese industrial city
Professional people-smugglers, popularly known as coyotes or polleros, have been a fixture of the U.S.-Mexico border landscape since the early 1950s. They gain notoriety only when their activities culminate in violent, media-genic incidents like the recent beating of two illegal immigrants by sheriff's deputies in Riverside and the fatal crashes of two smugglers' vehicles packed with illegal immigrants being pursued by the Border Patrol in Riverside and San Diego counties.
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