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October 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan, host to a high-profile climate conference to be held in December, announced a proposal that industrialized countries cut greenhouse gas emissions by 5% from 1990 levels by 2012. The proposal would allow countries to lower their targets for emission reduction based on such factors as population growth and gross domestic product. More than 150 signatories to a 1992 United Nations convention on climate changes will gather Dec.
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NEWS
October 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan, host to a high-profile climate conference to be held in December, announced a proposal that industrialized countries cut greenhouse gas emissions by 5% from 1990 levels by 2012. The proposal would allow countries to lower their targets for emission reduction based on such factors as population growth and gross domestic product. More than 150 signatories to a 1992 United Nations convention on climate changes will gather Dec.
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NEWS
June 9, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's campaign for the legal authority to send noncombat Japanese troops overseas on a regular basis passed its biggest hurdle today. After five consecutive early-morning sessions marked by obstructionist tactics by Socialists and Communists, the upper house of Parliament approved legislation that would let Japan send up to 2,000 troops overseas to take part in U.N.-sponsored peacekeeping operations.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama won approval Saturday for a historic reversal of his Socialist Party's pacifist policies, but the victory dealt a severe blow to party unity. A special party convention backed Murayama's declarations supporting the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, recognizing Japan's armed forces as constitutional, accepting nuclear power generation and acknowledging the national anthem and national flag.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa opened a new session of Parliament on Friday with a pledge to help the United States overcome what he called "not a little confusion" in its economy and to transform Japan, the economic giant, into a nation that is also a "living-standard giant."
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's next government should clearly apologize for World War II and "inform our children what their forefathers did in the past," Tsutomu Hata, who is expected to become the country's deputy prime minister, said Tuesday. Such action is needed, he said, to end constant foreign demands for apologies and continuing suspicion that Japan is bent on seeking military dominance again in Asia.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and Japan on Wednesday issued their first joint communique on an international issue in half a century and agreed to regular consultations on political and military affairs. The two steps promised to broaden what officials of both nations have recognized as a narrow and strained relationship. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze proposed, also for the first time, taking certain confidence-building measures to allay Japanese fear of Soviet military power.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his first press conference as Japanese prime minister, Kiichi Miyazawa spent nearly an hour and a half Wednesday discussing everything from economics and foreign policy to morality with a spontaneity and frankness that won accolades from political observers. Miyazawa raised serious questions, for example, about the role that human rights issues should play in foreign policy.
NEWS
November 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan must shed its historic reluctance to play a part in global political affairs and should become engaged in a broad range of international security matters, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney said here Friday. In a speech ostensibly designed to articulate U.S. foreign policy goals in Asia, Cheney prodded Japan to assume a greater role in fostering democracy and economic growth in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, as well as in other challenges facing the industrialized world.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | SAM JAMESON and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Japan will do its part to enforce key parts of international sanctions against North Korea, the Foreign Ministry publicly affirmed for the first time Tuesday, even as the United States toughened its proposals for punitive measures in response to Pyongyang's withdrawal from a worldwide nuclear monitoring agency.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's next government should clearly apologize for World War II and "inform our children what their forefathers did in the past," Tsutomu Hata, who is expected to become the country's deputy prime minister, said Tuesday. Such action is needed, he said, to end constant foreign demands for apologies and continuing suspicion that Japan is bent on seeking military dominance again in Asia.
NEWS
February 19, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite four days of rebuffs, Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday wound up the first visit to Japan by a United Nations' secretary general in 11 years by reiterating calls for Japan to play a larger role in U.N. peacekeeping missions. "If you are an important country, you have important responsibilities," he told reporters at the Japan National Press Club. "And Japan is a great power, a major country.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's campaign for the legal authority to send noncombat Japanese troops overseas on a regular basis passed its biggest hurdle today. After five consecutive early-morning sessions marked by obstructionist tactics by Socialists and Communists, the upper house of Parliament approved legislation that would let Japan send up to 2,000 troops overseas to take part in U.N.-sponsored peacekeeping operations.
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials stood tough Thursday against criticism that their response to recent military violence in Thailand was weak-kneed, defending their cautious policies as more effective in the long run than U.S.-style actions to quickly suspend aid. "Cutting off aid may destabilize the country and harm the people it was meant to help," a Foreign Ministry official said, adding that Japan needs to be extra careful with Thailand, since Tokyo provides 74% of Thailand's total foreign economic aid.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa declared Monday that failure to enact bills authorizing the dispatch of Japan's armed forces overseas for peacekeeping missions would make Japan look like a "strange" nation to the rest of the world. He also said the deceleration of Japan's economy is at an end and predicted that statistics for the January-March period, when announced in June, will show that an upward climb has begun.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One-third of Japanese voters, an 11% increase, favor revision of the nation's "peace constitution," a Yomiuri newspaper poll disclosed today. A bare majority--51%--remain opposed to revision, down six points from the last such poll in 1986.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
For more than 15 years, the United States has been urging Japan to play a larger role in world affairs. For nearly as long, Japan has been agreeing that it ought to do so. But Thursday's meeting in Washington between President Bush and Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita marked the first time that leaders of the two nations have been able to get down to brass tacks on what may be, at last, a new Japanese willingness to share some of the world's burdens with the United States.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid expectations of firm leadership and clear policies, Kiichi Miyazawa, one of Japan's top policy brains, came into office armed with the most extensive experience in government and politics that any Japanese leader ever brought to the prime minister's post. But after five months, firm leadership and clarity in policy-making have yet to appear.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa opened a new session of Parliament on Friday with a pledge to help the United States overcome what he called "not a little confusion" in its economy and to transform Japan, the economic giant, into a nation that is also a "living-standard giant."
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