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NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
The governor of Tokyo said Friday that he regretted offending foreigners and promised to stop using an insulting term for non-Japanese Asians living in the country. Gov. Shintaro Ishihara refused to apologize outright. But after a week of protests, he said he was sorry that his comments hurt feelings. "If I have carelessly hurt foreigners in general, that was not my intention, and I regret it," he said.
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NEWS
April 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
The governor of Tokyo said Friday that he regretted offending foreigners and promised to stop using an insulting term for non-Japanese Asians living in the country. Gov. Shintaro Ishihara refused to apologize outright. But after a week of protests, he said he was sorry that his comments hurt feelings. "If I have carelessly hurt foreigners in general, that was not my intention, and I regret it," he said.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew is a bouncy 14-month-old with an engaging grin and a warm home with an adopted family in a hamlet 100 miles northwest of Tokyo. But he lacks one treasure most people take for granted: a country. Born in the seamy world of sex and gangsters, Andrew is the product of a suspected tryst between a Filipino bar hostess and a Japanese client. Both of his birth parents have disappeared. As a result, neither the Japanese nor the Philippine government will grant him citizenship.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xenophobic rural Japan is in the throes of an import craze that is challenging its most intimate traditions. Deep in the mountainous heartland, the most sought-after commodity these days is a foreign bride. "When I turned 35, I started trying hard to get married and I tried for 10 years, but I couldn't find a wife," said Eibi Igarashi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
A third-generation Korean resident of Japan landed Tuesday in Tokyo on a flight from Los Angeles after earlier being barred from Japan because she had refused to be fingerprinted as an alien. Choi Sun Ae, a 28-year-old graduate student, was allowed into the country on a special 180-day visa, according to immigration officers at Tokyo's Narita airport. Choi, who was born in Japan, is not recognized by the Japanese government as a citizen because her parents are Korean.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Xenophobic rural Japan is in the throes of an import craze that is challenging its most intimate traditions. Deep in the mountainous heartland, the most sought-after commodity these days is a foreign bride. "When I turned 35, I started trying hard to get married and I tried for 10 years, but I couldn't find a wife," said Eibi Igarashi.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance encounter on a suburban train one recent Sunday sheds some awkward light on the elusive problem of racism in Japan. It began when a little Japanese girl pointed with fascination at a black woman and asked, "Daddy, what's that?" The father squirmed with embarrassment. He tried to satisfy the innocent curiosity of his preschool daughter by reminding her of an old Chinese fable known in Japan as "Saiyuki."
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew is a bouncy 14-month-old with an engaging grin and a warm home with an adopted family in a hamlet 100 miles northwest of Tokyo. But he lacks one treasure most people take for granted: a country. Born in the seamy world of sex and gangsters, Andrew is the product of a suspected tryst between a Filipino bar hostess and a Japanese client. Both of his birth parents have disappeared. As a result, neither the Japanese nor the Philippine government will grant him citizenship.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance encounter on a suburban train one recent Sunday sheds some awkward light on the elusive problem of racism in Japan. It began when a little Japanese girl pointed with fascination at a black woman and asked, "Daddy, what's that?" The father squirmed with embarrassment. He tried to satisfy the innocent curiosity of his preschool daughter by reminding her of an old Chinese fable known in Japan as "Saiyuki."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
A third-generation Korean resident of Japan landed Tuesday in Tokyo on a flight from Los Angeles after earlier being barred from Japan because she had refused to be fingerprinted as an alien. Choi Sun Ae, a 28-year-old graduate student, was allowed into the country on a special 180-day visa, according to immigration officers at Tokyo's Narita airport. Choi, who was born in Japan, is not recognized by the Japanese government as a citizen because her parents are Korean.
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