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NEWS
April 22, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after basking in the spotlight as the elder statesman who coached President Clinton on Russia policy, Richard Nixon had some free advice Wednesday for Japan: Demonstrate a little global leadership by giving more economic aid to your old Cold War foe. At a conference here on U.S.-Japan relations sponsored by the Nixon Library, the former President admonished Tokyo to transcend its dispute with Russia over four small islands. Japan should act more generously to support President Boris N.
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NEWS
March 1, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does Japan need to do to reverse the economic stagnation, political apathy and social ennui of the past decade? Throw open its stifling, conformist system and teach the Japanese to speak and read English, or they will be marginalized in the emerging global society, concludes a report to Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi that has generated increasing debate and headlines in recent weeks.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
'International Contribution Tax' Planned: A Finance Ministry official said the agency hopes to introduce an "international contribution tax" for the fiscal year beginning April 1. Administrative Vice Minister Hiroshi Yasuda said the tax will be a reserve for Japan's contribution to "international peace and stability."
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The year was 1969. President Richard Nixon asked Prime Minister Eisaku Sato to impose quotas on textile exports in exchange for the return of Okinawa. Sato used a notoriously ambiguous phrase-- "Zensho shimasu" --which can be translated as "I'll take a proper step," or "I'll take a favorable action," but often means rejection. Sato later denied promising quotas, and Nixon spent more than two years bludgeoning Japan into accepting them. The incident severely damaged U.S.-Japan relations.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
For much of the last three days, American officials have sought to contrast the first economic summit that President Reagan attended in 1981 with his last one this week. Reagan has shifted from free-market maverick to centrist, according to the White House view, as most of the six other industrial democracies that attend the summits have moved toward the right.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of today's meeting in Washington between President Bush and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu and just days before the start of talks on what the United States says are critically needed reforms in Japan's economic structure, Japan is sending out mixed signals on its willingness to resolve economic differences. An advisory group to the government's Economic Planning Agency on Wednesday backed an American demand that Japan reform its complicated distribution system.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan, already the world's largest foreign aid donor, plans to boost its overseas assistance budget by 7.8% in fiscal 1992, Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe said. He said the government's official development assistance would total $7.6 billion for the 1992 fiscal year beginning April 1, and that the increase in foreign aid indicates that Japan intends to step up its international contributions in line with its status as an economic superpower.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Iraq invaded Kuwait, the Yomiuri Shimbun, the newspaper with the world's largest circulation, had three correspondents in the Middle East. Now, there are nine, plus two staff photographers. To cover the Houston summit of advanced industrialized nations July 9-11, the newspaper that prints 14.5 million copies a day dispatched a deputy managing editor, a photographer and 15 correspondents, including at least one from each of the seven participating world capitals except Rome.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Right now, the Japanese are fascinated by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, especially her active role in her husband's presidency. But it was mere weeks ago when they were as fixated on one of their own, relatively rare, career women. Crown Princess Masako, a multilingual graduate of Harvard and Oxford universities, gave up a promising diplomatic career to become the newest member of the world's oldest imperial family.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Deep in the range of small mountains north of Kyoto is a small Buddhist temple where for the past 11 centuries monks have been praying to assuage the capricious spirit of the Kamo River, protecting the ancient capital in the basin below from floods. The modern successor to that tradition has taken on a new duty: fighting a flood control project he believes will devastate these wooded hills and fill the river with silt.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Right now, the Japanese are fascinated by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, especially her active role in her husband's presidency. But it was mere weeks ago when they were as fixated on one of their own, relatively rare, career women. Crown Princess Masako, a multilingual graduate of Harvard and Oxford universities, gave up a promising diplomatic career to become the newest member of the world's oldest imperial family.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after basking in the spotlight as the elder statesman who coached President Clinton on Russia policy, Richard Nixon had some free advice Wednesday for Japan: Demonstrate a little global leadership by giving more economic aid to your old Cold War foe. At a conference here on U.S.-Japan relations sponsored by the Nixon Library, the former President admonished Tokyo to transcend its dispute with Russia over four small islands. Japan should act more generously to support President Boris N.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
Consensus is growing in Japan in favor of an almost revolutionary idea: to back off. Japanese companies must rein in their pursuit of overseas market share at the sacrifice of profits, shareholder benefits and employee welfare, goes the new thinking, a turnaround from several months ago. Corporations should raise prices, pay workers better for fewer hours and distribute fatter dividends. They should, in short, become somewhat less competitive and more like the Western rivals they're outpacing.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan, already the world's largest foreign aid donor, plans to boost its overseas assistance budget by 7.8% in fiscal 1992, Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe said. He said the government's official development assistance would total $7.6 billion for the 1992 fiscal year beginning April 1, and that the increase in foreign aid indicates that Japan intends to step up its international contributions in line with its status as an economic superpower.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
'International Contribution Tax' Planned: A Finance Ministry official said the agency hopes to introduce an "international contribution tax" for the fiscal year beginning April 1. Administrative Vice Minister Hiroshi Yasuda said the tax will be a reserve for Japan's contribution to "international peace and stability."
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Iraq invaded Kuwait, the Yomiuri Shimbun, the newspaper with the world's largest circulation, had three correspondents in the Middle East. Now, there are nine, plus two staff photographers. To cover the Houston summit of advanced industrialized nations July 9-11, the newspaper that prints 14.5 million copies a day dispatched a deputy managing editor, a photographer and 15 correspondents, including at least one from each of the seven participating world capitals except Rome.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
Consensus is growing in Japan in favor of an almost revolutionary idea: to back off. Japanese companies must rein in their pursuit of overseas market share at the sacrifice of profits, shareholder benefits and employee welfare, goes the new thinking, a turnaround from several months ago. Corporations should raise prices, pay workers better for fewer hours and distribute fatter dividends. They should, in short, become somewhat less competitive and more like the Western rivals they're outpacing.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
In his final news conference as prime minister, Yasuhiro Nakasone acknowledged Wednesday that he had not accomplished what he most wanted to--"make Japan a nation respected in international society." Nakasone, who officially resigns Friday, told reporters that when he took office in 1982, Japan was being condemned as a nation that was "tricky" and "unfair," an "economic animal." "I wanted more than anything to wipe out these labels," he said. "I worked every day with that in mind."
BUSINESS
September 1, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of today's meeting in Washington between President Bush and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu and just days before the start of talks on what the United States says are critically needed reforms in Japan's economic structure, Japan is sending out mixed signals on its willingness to resolve economic differences. An advisory group to the government's Economic Planning Agency on Wednesday backed an American demand that Japan reform its complicated distribution system.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Deep in the range of small mountains north of Kyoto is a small Buddhist temple where for the past 11 centuries monks have been praying to assuage the capricious spirit of the Kamo River, protecting the ancient capital in the basin below from floods. The modern successor to that tradition has taken on a new duty: fighting a flood control project he believes will devastate these wooded hills and fill the river with silt.
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