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BUSINESS
February 28, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Jammed with automobiles and ambition, the streets here radiate a parvenu affluence. Even the cries of the muezzin from their graphite composite minarets sound prosperous. The Arabs call it mu'jizat al-Iqtisad al-Islami --the miracle of Islamic economics. Westerners call it an economic miracle that rivals postwar Germany's Wirtschaftwunder and Japan's rise to industrial superstardom. An overstatement? Perhaps.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Jammed with automobiles and ambition, the streets here radiate a parvenu affluence. Even the cries of the muezzin from their graphite composite minarets sound prosperous. The Arabs call it mu'jizat al-Iqtisad al-Islami --the miracle of Islamic economics. Westerners call it an economic miracle that rivals postwar Germany's Wirtschaftwunder and Japan's rise to industrial superstardom. An overstatement? Perhaps.
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NEWS
June 26, 1988
Japanese Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno said in Cairo that his country wants to expand its role in the Middle East from an aid donor to a political partner in promoting peace. Uno, on his first trip to the Middle East, arrived in Cairo on Friday after talks in Damascus, Syria, and Amman, Jordan. He is due in Israel today. "We recognize that peace cannot be achieved through the payment of money alone," he said after an hourlong meeting with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama is scheduled to arrive in Damascus today for talks with Syrian President Hafez Assad that could include discussions of Japanese help in transporting a Syrian armored brigade to the Saudi Arabian desert, a Japanese government spokesman said Sunday. The announcement came as Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu concluded two days of talks with the Saudi government and flew on to Oman for the last leg of a five-day tour of the Middle East.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days before his scheduled departure, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Monday postponed a trip to five Middle East countries. An official spokesman said Kaifu will stay in Tokyo and formulate new measures that his government will take in connection with the international effort to restore peace in the Persian Gulf region.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama is scheduled to arrive in Damascus today for talks with Syrian President Hafez Assad that could include discussions of Japanese help in transporting a Syrian armored brigade to the Saudi Arabian desert, a Japanese government spokesman said Sunday. The announcement came as Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu concluded two days of talks with the Saudi government and flew on to Oman for the last leg of a five-day tour of the Middle East.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In economics and trade, Japanese uniqueness has gone out of fashion. But in diplomacy, the Mideast crisis has shown once again that nearly everyone supports uniqueness for Japan. It is the only advanced nation allied to the United States from which President Bush has not sought military help to cope with Iraq's threat. And it is virtually the only nation that nearly everyone, Japanese and foreigner alike, agree should not send military forces. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1988 | From Reuters
A Palestinian leader told Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno on Monday that Japan, by exerting influence on the United States, could help bring peace to the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry said. Uno said in a meeting with Farouk Kaddoumi, head of the political department of the Palestine Liberation Organization, that Japan would support efforts for an international conference on the future of the occupied territories.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In economics and trade, Japanese uniqueness has gone out of fashion. But in diplomacy, the Mideast crisis has shown once again that nearly everyone supports uniqueness for Japan. It is the only advanced nation allied to the United States from which President Bush has not sought military help to cope with Iraq's threat. And it is virtually the only nation that nearly everyone, Japanese and foreigner alike, agree should not send military forces. U.S.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days before his scheduled departure, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Monday postponed a trip to five Middle East countries. An official spokesman said Kaifu will stay in Tokyo and formulate new measures that his government will take in connection with the international effort to restore peace in the Persian Gulf region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1988 | From Reuters
A Palestinian leader told Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno on Monday that Japan, by exerting influence on the United States, could help bring peace to the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry said. Uno said in a meeting with Farouk Kaddoumi, head of the political department of the Palestine Liberation Organization, that Japan would support efforts for an international conference on the future of the occupied territories.
NEWS
June 26, 1988
Japanese Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno said in Cairo that his country wants to expand its role in the Middle East from an aid donor to a political partner in promoting peace. Uno, on his first trip to the Middle East, arrived in Cairo on Friday after talks in Damascus, Syria, and Amman, Jordan. He is due in Israel today. "We recognize that peace cannot be achieved through the payment of money alone," he said after an hourlong meeting with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.
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