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Japan Foreign Relations Peru

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NEWS
January 24, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, when an attempted military coup caused President Alberto Fujimori to flee the presidential palace, he reportedly took refuge at the Japanese ambassador's residence. The coup failed, but Fujimori's choice of sanctuary--reported back then by the respected magazine Caretas--reflected the special bond between Peru and Japan.
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NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Japan's government has determined that ousted Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori holds Japanese citizenship, an official said Monday, a development that could allow him to stay in the country as long as he wants. A government investigation found that Fujimori was born in Peru but registered by his parents at a local Japanese Consulate, making him a Japanese citizen, a Foreign Ministry official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
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NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government will not use force to free 72 hostages held by leftist rebels except in "an unmanageable emergency," and it does not expect that to happen, President Alberto Fujimori said. Fujimori, in Bolivia to brief President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada on the hostage crisis, said after a meeting with Sanchez de Lozada that Japan and Peru are united in seeking a peaceful solution to the standoff at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima, the Peruvian capital.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alberto Fujimori was elected president of Peru a decade ago, the Japanese public was elated. The foreign-born son of Japanese emigrants had made it big on the world stage. Surveys here ranked his election among the most exciting foreign news stories of 1990. Japanese camera crews dashed to Peru to satisfy the huge public demand for coverage. Reporters camped out at his ancestral village of Kawachi to interview his relatives, question shopkeepers and chat up local historians.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | From Reuters
People cried "Banzai!" and relatives laid out a meal of seafood and rice wine when Peruvian President-elect Alberto Fujimori returned Wednesday to his family's ancestral home, the sleepy Japanese town of Kawachi. "It was an emotional and sentimental visit," said Fujimori, an ethnic Japanese whose parents left this town early in the century to seek a better life across the Pacific.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto met Peru's President Alberto Fujimori and formally thanked him for an "admirable" hostage rescue that ended an 18-week standoff with rebels at his ambassador's home in the capital, Lima. Hashimoto said he regretted the deaths of a hostage and two commandos in the military's April 22 raid that freed 71 captives from 14 rebels who had stormed a reception at the residence in December.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | Reuters
News of Alberto Fujimori's victory in Peru's presidential election brought people into the streets to celebrate half a world away in Kawachi, the small Japanese town where his father was born. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu also welcomed the news. But a Japanese government spokesman ruled out any special economic aid for the hugely indebted South American country just because its new leader is of Japanese descent. "Our government does not take special measures on the grounds that a Japanese descendant has won (an election)
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Japan's government has determined that ousted Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori holds Japanese citizenship, an official said Monday, a development that could allow him to stay in the country as long as he wants. A government investigation found that Fujimori was born in Peru but registered by his parents at a local Japanese Consulate, making him a Japanese citizen, a Foreign Ministry official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alberto Fujimori was elected president of Peru a decade ago, the Japanese public was elated. The foreign-born son of Japanese emigrants had made it big on the world stage. Surveys here ranked his election among the most exciting foreign news stories of 1990. Japanese camera crews dashed to Peru to satisfy the huge public demand for coverage. Reporters camped out at his ancestral village of Kawachi to interview his relatives, question shopkeepers and chat up local historians.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto met Peru's President Alberto Fujimori and formally thanked him for an "admirable" hostage rescue that ended an 18-week standoff with rebels at his ambassador's home in the capital, Lima. Hashimoto said he regretted the deaths of a hostage and two commandos in the military's April 22 raid that freed 71 captives from 14 rebels who had stormed a reception at the residence in December.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The government will not use force to free 72 hostages held by leftist rebels except in "an unmanageable emergency," and it does not expect that to happen, President Alberto Fujimori said. Fujimori, in Bolivia to brief President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada on the hostage crisis, said after a meeting with Sanchez de Lozada that Japan and Peru are united in seeking a peaceful solution to the standoff at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima, the Peruvian capital.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, when an attempted military coup caused President Alberto Fujimori to flee the presidential palace, he reportedly took refuge at the Japanese ambassador's residence. The coup failed, but Fujimori's choice of sanctuary--reported back then by the respected magazine Caretas--reflected the special bond between Peru and Japan.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | From Reuters
People cried "Banzai!" and relatives laid out a meal of seafood and rice wine when Peruvian President-elect Alberto Fujimori returned Wednesday to his family's ancestral home, the sleepy Japanese town of Kawachi. "It was an emotional and sentimental visit," said Fujimori, an ethnic Japanese whose parents left this town early in the century to seek a better life across the Pacific.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | Reuters
News of Alberto Fujimori's victory in Peru's presidential election brought people into the streets to celebrate half a world away in Kawachi, the small Japanese town where his father was born. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu also welcomed the news. But a Japanese government spokesman ruled out any special economic aid for the hugely indebted South American country just because its new leader is of Japanese descent. "Our government does not take special measures on the grounds that a Japanese descendant has won (an election)
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