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NEWS
January 30, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His grandfather was a forced laborer in Japan's coal mines, but college student Lee Soo Hyun came from South Korea to Tokyo voluntarily to study Japanese and build bridges between the two countries. Over the weekend, the 26-year-old Lee died a hero to both nations. He and another good Samaritan, a Japanese photographer, were hit by a train Friday night as they tried to rescue an apparently drunk man who had fallen onto the tracks.
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NEWS
August 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Japan approved a controversial right-wing textbook in March, the South Korean government has demanded revisions to the Japanese curriculum and stepped up long-standing accusations that Japan whitewashes the history taught in its schools. Seoul insists that Japan admit to its own students and the world that it subjugated East Asia, forced Korean women into prostitution and jailed and killed men who resisted Japan's 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula.
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SPORTS
August 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The opportunity to speak with Sohn Kee Chung is the opportunity to hear a lesson in 20th-Century Korean history, and that is what he gave as he entertained guests at his modern sixth-floor apartment in a middle-class part of the city. Outside, although it was Saturday morning, children who were dressed in uniforms walked with various degrees of enthusiasm toward school for a half-day of studies, and street vendors sold Heinz ketchup, Smuckers jam, Velveeta cheese and other U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung refused to meet a high-level Japanese delegation in a show of anger over Tokyo's refusal to revise controversial history textbooks. In April, Japan approved a middle school book written by nationalist scholars who deny that Japan committed historically documented atrocities during World War II. Seoul formally asked Tokyo to revise 35 passages that it believes gloss over atrocities committed by Japan from 1910 to 1945.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Japan approved a controversial right-wing textbook in March, the South Korean government has demanded revisions to the Japanese curriculum and stepped up long-standing accusations that Japan whitewashes the history taught in its schools. Seoul insists that Japan admit to its own students and the world that it subjugated East Asia, forced Korean women into prostitution and jailed and killed men who resisted Japan's 1910-45 colonization of the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The title aims to inflame: "18 Reasons Why South Korea Will Die Before It Catches Up With Japan." More audacious still, the book's author, Tadashi Momose, is Japanese. Are South Koreans offended by a book criticizing everything from their penchant for payola to their driving habits, written by a businessman from the country that was Korea's colonial master until 1945 and is now its fiercest economic rival? Nope. They're eating it up.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | Associated Press
Hundreds of demonstrators marched through Seoul on Tuesday to protest a visit to South Korea by Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. Riot police halted the protesters--most of them relatives of Koreans killed or forced to serve as prostitutes for Japanese soldiers during World War II--a few hundred yards from the National Assembly building. "Japan must make an official and immediate apology for what (it) did to us in the past," the protesters chanted.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At his first press conference as Japanese prime minister, Kiichi Miyazawa spent nearly an hour and a half Wednesday discussing everything from economics and foreign policy to morality with a spontaneity and frankness that won accolades from political observers. Miyazawa raised serious questions, for example, about the role that human rights issues should play in foreign policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Japanese officials seized a South Korean boat Friday on charges of illegal eel fishing in Japanese waters off the city of Noshiro, about 312 miles northwest of Tokyo, the Maritime Safety Agency reported.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
South Korea is seeking $2.3 billion from Japan in reparations for Korean victims of the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the newspaper Dong-A Ilbo reported in Seoul. The newspaper said that diplomatic talks are under way and that Tokyo is said to be ready to accommodate part of Seoul's request.
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His grandfather was a forced laborer in Japan's coal mines, but college student Lee Soo Hyun came from South Korea to Tokyo voluntarily to study Japanese and build bridges between the two countries. Over the weekend, the 26-year-old Lee died a hero to both nations. He and another good Samaritan, a Japanese photographer, were hit by a train Friday night as they tried to rescue an apparently drunk man who had fallen onto the tracks.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, Toyoji Kuroda has been promoting Japanese movies abroad. But in South Korea, Kuroda, an official with the Assn. to Promote Japanese Films Overseas, rarely has been able to get past "go"--meaning the government. Because of lingering bitterness toward Japan, which occupied the Korean peninsula from 1910 to 1945, Seoul still bans most Japanese movies, music and comics.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi issued his country's most thorough apology to date to the South Korean people for 35 years of brutal colonial rule. A joint declaration made by Obuchi and South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, who is visiting Tokyo, said Obuchi "expressed deep remorse and extended a heartfelt apology to the people of South Korea." It was the first written apology ever issued to an individual country by Japan for its actions up to, before and during World War II.
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
South Korea celebrated the 50th anniversary of its birth as a republic on Saturday by releasing 2,174 prisoners, including more than 100 political prisoners. Those freed were among 7,007 prisoners granted amnesty by President Kim Dae Jung on Friday to mark the day that is also the 53rd anniversary of the peninsula's liberation from Japanese rule. Prison officers said the 2,174 prisoners were released on parole at 10 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The title aims to inflame: "18 Reasons Why South Korea Will Die Before It Catches Up With Japan." More audacious still, the book's author, Tadashi Momose, is Japanese. Are South Koreans offended by a book criticizing everything from their penchant for payola to their driving habits, written by a businessman from the country that was Korea's colonial master until 1945 and is now its fiercest economic rival? Nope. They're eating it up.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scabbed stump of Chang Gi Chan's mangled arm is about all he has to show for a life cursed with colossal bad luck. Born under Japan's brutal colonial rule of his native Korea, Chang was wrenched from his wife and baby daughter in 1944 and shipped to the frigid wasteland of Sakhalin island off the coast of Siberia as a slave laborer for the Japanese Imperial Army.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo urged Japan on Friday to open its markets to Korean goods, and he also warned that it must eliminate discrimination against its 700,000 Korean residents. Speaking in Parliament, Roh asked Japan to try to correct its "chronic trade imbalance" with South Korea using "similar determination" that it has shown in its efforts to open Japanese markets to the United States and Europe.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here today for a controversial state visit that is arousing intense emotions in both Japan and South Korea over the bitter historical legacy shared by the Asian neighbors. Roh set the tone of his three-day visit on May 14 when he told Japanese reporters in Seoul that he hopes Emperor Akihito will make a clear-cut apology to South Koreans for Japan's 1910-1945 colonization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the World Cup soccer games bringing them together, the upcoming meeting between South Korean President Kim Young Sam and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto represents yet another effort to move a fragile relationship beyond an acrimonious past to a cooperative future. Both sides say they are striving for an upbeat summit, scheduled for Saturday and Sunday on the South Korean island of Cheju.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | Times Staff Writer
Both Japan and South Korea on Tuesday laid claim to waters between them, but they sidestepped the volatile issue of who owns two tiny islands in the Sea of Japan's rich fishing grounds. The Japanese Cabinet approved a plan to establish a 200-nautical-mile exclusive economic zone in the area under the U.N. Law of the Sea treaty, a series of coordinated rules that took effect in 1994 to provide more equity in the carving-up of the world's ocean resources. Hours later, Seoul followed suit.
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