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NEWS
February 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer and
Emperor Hirohito, a man once despised by much of the world as the symbol of ruthless Japanese military aggression, was honored by the international community today as kings, presidents and other representatives of 163 countries attended his elaborate state funeral.
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WORLD
April 17, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The prospect of power shortages in Japan this summer, of stifling city apartments and manufacturing slowdowns, has divided a country still reeling from the worst nuclear catastrophe since Chernobyl over whether to restart some of its idled reactors. The government contends that the country can't afford not to resume nuclear energy production. The last operating nuclear reactor in Japan, on the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, will be taken off line May 5 for stress tests and safety improvements.
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NEWS
November 1, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to form a new coalition government, the Liberal Democratic Party on Thursday struck a loose alliance with two smaller parties that virtually ensures Ryutaro Hashimoto will continue as Japan's prime minister. But how effectively he can implement his conservative, pro-business policies as head of a minority government remained unclear. The LDP scored sharp gains in the Oct.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Laura King and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
— It's hard to imagine this city without its trademark blaze of neon — the garish, flashing signs that routinely turn the Tokyo nightscape into a phantasmagoric riot of color. On Sunday night, though, little imagination was needed. Tokyo didn't go dark. But it dimmed itself, a voluntary power conservation measure after Friday's catastrophic earthquake. Even what may be the city's most iconic structure, the 1,092-foot Tokyo Tower, turned out the lights. In the city's most neon-heavy precincts, Shinjuku and Ginza, people strolling the sidewalks on a cool, clear evening eyed the surrounding skyscrapers, pointing out to each other the gaps in what is normally a hallucinogenic, strobe-lit stream of images and Japanese-language characters.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumie Suzuki was 21 when she was found to have leprosy. Her family locked her in a room and slid her food through the doorway. After a year, she was exiled to an isolated leprosarium. Alone, she made the journey to a colony to which no roads led, stumbling on her weak, nerve-damaged legs. Her mother's parting words were: "Never come back. And die quickly."
BUSINESS
November 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Japan's government approved a massive, $172-billion spending package on Thursday, the latest in a series of stimulus measures aimed at spurring the lackluster economy. The package, larger than the $143-billion plan analysts had predicted, is expected to push economic growth from the forecast 0.5% to 0.6% this fiscal year. The government earmarked $70.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Yet another sex scandal has rocked the Japanese political world, as a key minister in the Cabinet of Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu resigned today after he admitted having an extramarital affair with a bar hostess and attempting to pay her $21,000 just before taking office earlier this month.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing the white silk robes of a high Shinto priest, Japan's Emperor Akihito communed Thursday night with his mythical ancestor, the Sun Goddess, in a torchlight enthronement ritual that was clouded by controversy over the constitutional separation of religion and state. The government-funded religious ceremony climaxed Akihito's elaborate rite of passage into emperorhood, which began nearly two years ago with the death of his father, Hirohito.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joji Abe, a reformed yakuza bookmaker, ex-convict and now a popular novelist, says it didn't require much imagination to conceive of the perfect counterfeiting crime. The Japanese government pointed the way. Abe took writing inspiration from the Finance Ministry's seemingly avaricious plan to generate quick revenue by minting a commemorative gold coin and selling it off to the general public--as legal tender--at a face value more than twice its actual gold content.
NEWS
September 27, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto dissolved the House of Representatives today, clearing the way for the first general election under a new system aimed at empowering urban voters, encouraging policy debates and cracking down on political corruption. The Hashimoto Cabinet was expected later today to officially set the election for Oct. 20. The official campaign season will open Oct.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2001 | From Bloomberg News and Times Staff
Japan said Monday that industrial production fell twice as much as expected in June, increasing pressure on companies to shed workers and cut costs as the world's second-largest economy apparently sinks into recession. The news drove the Nikkei 225 stock index to a new 16-year low, following a bigger-than-expected win by the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in Sunday's Upper House election. Production fell 0.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not be Camelot. But the breeze blowing through politics here this week is every bit as refreshing to the average Japanese as was John F. Kennedy's leap to the Oval Office in 1961 to many Americans. The administration of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, a ruling Liberal Democratic Party member who swept into power Thursday promising reform, faces lots of problems and has little time.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While studying at the London School of Economics in 1969, Junichiro Koizumi received a telegram that his lawmaker father had died of lung cancer. Returning to Tokyo, he found a simple handwritten message from his dad: "Junichiro Koizumi, be victorious." Koizumi was elected today as prime minister of Japan. With his ascendancy, the dark horse 59-year-old reformer will far exceed his father's expectations--and those of most Japanese as recently as a week ago.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quixotic reformer Junichiro Koizumi is virtually certain to become Japan's next prime minister after a groundswell of grass-roots support over the weekend ensured his election today as ruling-party president. Normally obedient rank-and-file members of the Liberal Democratic Party, which has ruled Japan for most of the last five decades, defied power brokers and slammed home the message that without a new way of doing things, the LDP can't survive.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside Japan's drab Foreign Ministry building stands a 200-square-yard prefab building with a small but significant plaque: "Information Disclosure Room, Second Floor." Thanks to a freedom of information law that took effect this month, citizens can now obtain details of national civil servants' actions and the use of tax dollars at the Foreign Ministry and dozens other federal agencies.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When is Japan's beleaguered Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori--who was reported Saturday night to have signaled his intention to resign--actually going to step down? That's the question that has obsessed the media in the world's second-largest economy for the last few weeks in an ongoing soap opera about whether the gaffe-prone and widely unpopular Mori is in or out.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The Rising Sun flag and an ode to the emperor were officially voted Japan's symbols Monday after years of debate over whether the move would be a sign of resurgent nationalism. The upper house of parliament voted in favor of the bill after overwhelming approval by the lower house last month.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political chaos that hit Japan's government early today, just 12 hours after the election of new Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata, may derail an expected economic recovery and lead to worsening trade friction with the United States. Much depends, however, on how long the collapse of Hata's ruling coalition delays policy-making. The risk of stalemate is also balanced, to some degree, by the possibility that current upheavals will eventually bring a more stable political structure.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time and options running out and more bad news piling up, Japan's central bank cut two key interest rates nearly to the vanishing point Wednesday in a feeble attempt to put a floor under the sagging economy. "It doesn't really do very much," said Garry Evans, strategist with HSBC Securities. "What's a tenth of a percentage point between friends?" In fact, the Bank of Japan doesn't have a lot of friends these days.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
After apologies from President Bush and other top officials, the families of nine Japanese who are missing and presumed dead received the words of remorse they wanted most--from the captain of the U.S. submarine that scattered their loved ones at sea. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, whose submarine struck and sank a Japanese trawler off Hawaii on Feb.
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