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Japan Government Agencies

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BUSINESS
October 28, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first such action, Japan's securities industry watchdog agency recommended Friday that the Finance Ministry impose sanctions against Merrill Lynch & Co. for violations of rules guarding against stock price manipulation. While not accusing Merrill of actually trying to manipulate prices--the amounts of stock involved were too small to do that--the Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission called the violations "quite serious."
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NEWS
January 7, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move of epic proportions aimed at expanding efficiency and shifting the power balance from bureaucrats to politicians, Japan on Saturday cut its number of national ministries and agencies nearly in half. Hallways throughout Tokyo's Kasumigaseki district, the base of the central government, were piled high with more than 130,000 boxes as bureaucrats scurried to find mislaid documents, and moving vans outside disgorged more in the biggest such revamp since World War II.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Agency Files Price-Fixing Complaint: Under U.S. pressure, Japan's Fair Trade Commission filed its first criminal complaint against price fixing in 17 years. The complaint against eight major food-wrapping manufacturers marks a small victory both for the commission, which has been scorned as a toothless watchdog, and the United States, which has been trying to pry open Japanese markets.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese yen fell to an eight-year low against the U.S. dollar Tuesday as more bad news battered the archipelago and left many in Japan and beyond wondering when the free fall would finally end. "Japan used to have such a strong currency that we thought it would become a new global standard," said Tadanori Yoneyama, a retail executive in Tokyo. "Now it's sad to know the rest of the world doesn't have much trust in us." The yen hit a low of 147.64 per dollar in Tokyo on Tuesday from 146.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move of epic proportions aimed at expanding efficiency and shifting the power balance from bureaucrats to politicians, Japan on Saturday cut its number of national ministries and agencies nearly in half. Hallways throughout Tokyo's Kasumigaseki district, the base of the central government, were piled high with more than 130,000 boxes as bureaucrats scurried to find mislaid documents, and moving vans outside disgorged more in the biggest such revamp since World War II.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Cracking down on corruption in Japan's financial industry, a new watchdog agency handed out penalties to nine major banks and four brokerages whose employees were accused of wining and dining public officials. The Financial Supervisory Agency announced Friday that it is banning Sanwa Bank from mutual fund sales for one year. It imposed lesser penalties on the other banks and brokerages. The agency was set up in June to root out widespread corruption in the financial industry.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered by criticism of its handling of a $1.1-billion scandal at Daiwa Bank's New York branch, Japan's Finance Ministry declared Friday that it will move away from its traditional cozy relationship with the nation's banks. The ministry now wants to apply a more strict investigative and regulatory approach to its oversight, especially of the international activities of Japanese banks, spokesman Yukio Yoshimura told a news conference.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Securities Watchdog Plan Passes Hurdle: The Diet approved a bill to establish a securities and exchange watchdog, with the new commission to begin work in July. The three-member commission is aimed at preventing a recurrence of stock scandals that shook financial markets a year ago. It will investigate possible violations of securities and exchange laws, bring charges against violators or recommend government administrative action.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Agency Knew of Stock-Loss Pay-Backs in 1983: Finance Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto said his agency knew in 1983 that brokerages were compensating favored clients for stock trading losses but said the agency didn't know the large scale of the problem until 1989. Instead of taking action against the brokerages, it merely advised them to avoid the practice, Hashimoto said at a lower house budget committee meeting. Seventeen brokerages have admitted that they provided almost $1.
NEWS
December 2, 1988
Japanese police sought criminal charges against 20 people, including employees of Boeing Co., Japan Air Lines and the Japanese Transport Ministry, after a three-year investigation of the 1985 crash of a Boeing 747 that killed 520 people. Police said the crash resulted from professional negligence in repairing, inspecting and maintaining the plane after it scraped its tail in a hard landing at Osaka in 1978. Boeing said it believes the accident did not involve a criminal act.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Cracking down on corruption in Japan's financial industry, a new watchdog agency handed out penalties to nine major banks and four brokerages whose employees were accused of wining and dining public officials. The Financial Supervisory Agency announced Friday that it is banning Sanwa Bank from mutual fund sales for one year. It imposed lesser penalties on the other banks and brokerages. The agency was set up in June to root out widespread corruption in the financial industry.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered by criticism of its handling of a $1.1-billion scandal at Daiwa Bank's New York branch, Japan's Finance Ministry declared Friday that it will move away from its traditional cozy relationship with the nation's banks. The ministry now wants to apply a more strict investigative and regulatory approach to its oversight, especially of the international activities of Japanese banks, spokesman Yukio Yoshimura told a news conference.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first such action, Japan's securities industry watchdog agency recommended Friday that the Finance Ministry impose sanctions against Merrill Lynch & Co. for violations of rules guarding against stock price manipulation. While not accusing Merrill of actually trying to manipulate prices--the amounts of stock involved were too small to do that--the Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission called the violations "quite serious."
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Securities Watchdog Plan Passes Hurdle: The Diet approved a bill to establish a securities and exchange watchdog, with the new commission to begin work in July. The three-member commission is aimed at preventing a recurrence of stock scandals that shook financial markets a year ago. It will investigate possible violations of securities and exchange laws, bring charges against violators or recommend government administrative action.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Agency Files Price-Fixing Complaint: Under U.S. pressure, Japan's Fair Trade Commission filed its first criminal complaint against price fixing in 17 years. The complaint against eight major food-wrapping manufacturers marks a small victory both for the commission, which has been scorned as a toothless watchdog, and the United States, which has been trying to pry open Japanese markets.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Agency Knew of Stock-Loss Pay-Backs in 1983: Finance Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto said his agency knew in 1983 that brokerages were compensating favored clients for stock trading losses but said the agency didn't know the large scale of the problem until 1989. Instead of taking action against the brokerages, it merely advised them to avoid the practice, Hashimoto said at a lower house budget committee meeting. Seventeen brokerages have admitted that they provided almost $1.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1989
Free agency is a bonanza for rich clubs who can sit back and pluck the best players out of organizations who develop talent the old-fashioned way: through their farm systems. A winning team used to be a result of careful nurturing of young ballplayers and productive trades. Now all a club needs is the backing of a wealthy cowboy, an arrogant shipbuilder or a real estate magnate. Ah, to the good ol' days, when banks were solvent, Japan made inferior products and ballplayers weren't billionaires.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese yen fell to an eight-year low against the U.S. dollar Tuesday as more bad news battered the archipelago and left many in Japan and beyond wondering when the free fall would finally end. "Japan used to have such a strong currency that we thought it would become a new global standard," said Tadanori Yoneyama, a retail executive in Tokyo. "Now it's sad to know the rest of the world doesn't have much trust in us." The yen hit a low of 147.64 per dollar in Tokyo on Tuesday from 146.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1989
Free agency is a bonanza for rich clubs who can sit back and pluck the best players out of organizations who develop talent the old-fashioned way: through their farm systems. A winning team used to be a result of careful nurturing of young ballplayers and productive trades. Now all a club needs is the backing of a wealthy cowboy, an arrogant shipbuilder or a real estate magnate. Ah, to the good ol' days, when banks were solvent, Japan made inferior products and ballplayers weren't billionaires.
NEWS
December 2, 1988
Japanese police sought criminal charges against 20 people, including employees of Boeing Co., Japan Air Lines and the Japanese Transport Ministry, after a three-year investigation of the 1985 crash of a Boeing 747 that killed 520 people. Police said the crash resulted from professional negligence in repairing, inspecting and maintaining the plane after it scraped its tail in a hard landing at Osaka in 1978. Boeing said it believes the accident did not involve a criminal act.
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