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June 30, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumie Suzuki was 21 when she was found to have leprosy. Her family locked her in a room and slid her food through the doorway. After a year, she was exiled to an isolated leprosarium. Alone, she made the journey to a colony to which no roads led, stumbling on her weak, nerve-damaged legs. Her mother's parting words were: "Never come back. And die quickly."
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NEWS
October 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Responding to concern over the nation's first case of "mad cow" disease, Japan banned the domestic distribution of cattle feed made with recycled cow parts. Imported meat-and-bone meal had previously been banned. The move, which takes effect Thursday, also bars the use of domestic and imported meat-and-bone meal in fertilizers, the Agriculture Ministry said. A cow in central Japan was found last month to have bovine spongiform encephalopathy.
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NEWS
October 30, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Consumers in Japan are unknowingly eating dolphin and porpoise-- marketed as whale meat--that contain dangerously high levels of mercury and other contaminants, according to new research by a Harvard University biologist. The scientist who discovered the contamination feels so strongly about the health threat that he took the unusual step last week of writing a letter to top Japanese officials calling for public warnings and an immediate ban on sales of the contaminated meat.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a bid to preempt "mad cow" disease, Japan barred medicine and cosmetics makers from using animals and animal parts from 28 countries. It also banned the importation of intestines from countries where animals are at risk. The disease is thought to cause a brain-wasting variant in humans. Since 1996, Japan has banned the use of cattle from Britain, where the disease was first reported.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was 19, handsome and athletic, the eldest son and brightest hope of his family. And when Satoshi Kaku began downing glass after glass of booze at a party one night last October, he was performing the rite of passage that would give the Chuo University freshman entree into the clubby world of his college ski group for the next four years. But he never made it. Within 24 hours, Kaku was dead.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic show of contrition from a Cabinet official, Japan's health minister tearfully apologized Friday to AIDS sufferers for allowing contaminated blood products to be administered to the nation's hemophiliacs. "The Health and Welfare Ministry and the government are responsible for everything. . . .
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noriko Matsuo is afraid to keep breast-feeding her baby. "To think that dioxin might be flowing out of me to her is horrible," Matsuo said as her 1-year-old squirmed on her lap. She also wonders if it's safe to let her 3-year-old play in the local sandbox while 38 incinerators within a 2 1/2-mile radius are spewing dioxin-laden smoke into the atmosphere of this leafy bedroom community.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a bid to preempt "mad cow" disease, Japan barred medicine and cosmetics makers from using animals and animal parts from 28 countries. It also banned the importation of intestines from countries where animals are at risk. The disease is thought to cause a brain-wasting variant in humans. Since 1996, Japan has banned the use of cattle from Britain, where the disease was first reported.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | Reuters
A baby girl died of food poisoning near Tokyo today, bringing to eight the number of deaths this year from a fatal bacteria. A spokesman for the Chiba city government said that the 21-month-old was infected with the E. coli 0157 bacteria, which has sickened more than 9,000 nationwide. The government suspects that the source of the bacteria is contaminated radish sprouts.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | United Press International
The Japanese people--already the longest living in the world--broke their own records for life expectancy in 1989 with women living to an average of 81.77 years and men 75.91 years. According to the World Bank, Japan had previously topped the world in life expectancy with an average life span for both men and women of 78.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, she thought it was a bad case of jet lag. Then her vision began to blur, and she got lost on the walk to the nearby post office. Her handwriting became childlike, and she was tormented by hallucinogenic nightmares. Within four months of her first headache, Takako Tani quite literally lost her mind to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, the human form of the fatal brain-wasting malady known as "mad cow" disease. It was 1996. She was 41.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark decision that raises the standard for corporate accountability in Japan, an Osaka court Thursday sentenced three former pharmaceutical executives to prison for continuing to sell blood products they knew could be tainted with the AIDS virus even after safer substitutes were available. The bluntly worded verdict marks the first time a Japanese drug company executive has received a prison sentence for professional negligence in connection with harmful drugs, legal experts said.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Consumers in Japan are unknowingly eating dolphin and porpoise-- marketed as whale meat--that contain dangerously high levels of mercury and other contaminants, according to new research by a Harvard University biologist. The scientist who discovered the contamination feels so strongly about the health threat that he took the unusual step last week of writing a letter to top Japanese officials calling for public warnings and an immediate ban on sales of the contaminated meat.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noriko Matsuo is afraid to keep breast-feeding her baby. "To think that dioxin might be flowing out of me to her is horrible," Matsuo said as her 1-year-old squirmed on her lap. She also wonders if it's safe to let her 3-year-old play in the local sandbox while 38 incinerators within a 2 1/2-mile radius are spewing dioxin-laden smoke into the atmosphere of this leafy bedroom community.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Shinobu Sakamoto labors to produce speech from her poison-twisted body, her hands flutter like wounded birds, her right eye rolls upward and her mouth contorts with effort. She needs a friend to translate some of the ensuing sounds into language a stranger can understand. The process is slow and obviously exhausting, but Sakamoto is undaunted. She is angry and wants to be heard.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A food poisoning mystery that investigators have yet to solve claimed its 10th fatality Friday, a 12-year-old girl who died a month after eating a contaminated school lunch. Despite almost three months of investigation, health officials cannot pinpoint the source of the elusive, virulent 0157 E. coli bacteria that has sickened more than 6,000 children in the Osaka suburb of Sakai and caused smaller outbreaks across Japan. Farmers have begun dumping fresh produce that consumers are afraid to eat.
NEWS
February 25, 1987
Japan would ban foreign AIDS carriers from the country under a wide-ranging plan to stem the spread of the deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Health and Welfare Ministry officials said they are studying various proposals for new legislation but did not say how a ban on carriers would be enforced. Japan has had 26 confirmed AIDS patients, 17 of whom have died.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto called an emergency meeting of health, education and agriculture officials as the number of victims in a food poisoning outbreak neared 6,000, most of them children. The outbreak of a strain of E. coli bacteria is Japan's worst bout of food poisoning in almost a decade. Officials suspect most of the victims ate tainted cafeteria food at 53 public schools in Sakai, about 265 miles southwest of Tokyo.
NEWS
August 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of people were sickened in a new food poisoning outbreak, and the death of an elderly woman raised the death toll from Japan's E. coli bacteria epidemic to nine. The fresh outbreak in Hiroshima affected 42 people attending the Japan Esperanto Congress. Thirteen of them were hospitalized. Officials in Hiroshima said the new cases were not caused by the 0157 strain of E. coli bacteria that has sickened 9,000 people nationwide.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | Reuters
A baby girl died of food poisoning near Tokyo today, bringing to eight the number of deaths this year from a fatal bacteria. A spokesman for the Chiba city government said that the 21-month-old was infected with the E. coli 0157 bacteria, which has sickened more than 9,000 nationwide. The government suspects that the source of the bacteria is contaminated radish sprouts.
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