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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chanting, "Japan, apologize," and "Japan, tell the truth," more than 200 Asian American protesters Tuesday demanded that the Japanese government pull back new history textbooks that they say whitewash Japan's crimes against its neighbors before and during World War II.
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WORLD
October 30, 2009 | Ju-min Park and Yuriko Nagano
Several politicians in South Korea and Japan have begun exploring the possibility of a joint history textbook between their nations and China. But given the lingering differences over issues ranging from past wars to current territorial claims, the proposal faces numerous hurdles. Members of South Korea's ruling Grand National Party met informally in Seoul this month with counterparts from the majority Democratic Party of Japan. One of the main topics was whether a joint history textbook could now be developed with government cooperation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1993
Japan's continuing failure to come to terms with its past is worrying its Asian neighbors and disappointing its allies everywhere. What Tokyo has achieved economically is undercut by its traditional reluctance to accept responsibility publicly for Japanese aggression and atrocities during the 1930s and 1940s. Tokyo only recently acknowledged the forced wartime enlistment of thousands of women--many of them Korean--as "comfort women" in Japanese army brothels.
OPINION
April 18, 2005
The article, "Japan's Revisionist History" by Philip J. Cunningham (Commentary, April 11), displays a lack of understanding of the process by which Japanese textbooks are screened and approved and the position of the Japanese government in facing the past squarely. He points out: "That tacit government approval is given to such xenophobic, right-wing thinking can be seen in the latest Ministry of Education-approved school texts that erase or evade critical lessons drawn from Japan's bad behavior in its war of aggression."
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mariko Terasaki Miller, leafing through her father's diaries and looking at the pages of Japanese characters was a longtime ritual. Miller and her mother, Gwen Harold Terasaki, could not read the writing, but they were content to study the simple ink sketches of mountain ranges and family photographs and to point out the only Japanese words they knew--their names. Translation was out of the question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1998
It was nearly devastated by a war, but 40 years later it emerged in the 1980s as a worldwide force. Though Japan is a geographically small country, it has the second-largest economy in the world, fueled by its strength in the automotive and electronics industries. Japan also enjoys one of the highest standards of living. To learn more about Japan, use the direct links on The Times' Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.com/launchpoint/ .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Touring Los Angeles' Little Tokyo for the first time this week, Japanese attorney Takashi Niimi paused in front of the eye-catching "Friendship Knot" monument. What an unusual work of art, he was thinking, when his eye caught the bronze inscription at the foot of the sculpture.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is regarded by many as the perfect leader for Japan's confusing times of economic retrenchment, political chaos and social malaise: a man of bold action and inspired leadership capable of unifying this dispirited nation. Trouble is, he's been dead for nearly 400 years.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
The desert has come to Japan. Workmen have installed a piece of China's Taklimakan Desert in Nara Park, sealed inside a tent-like structure surrounded by gamboling deer and lush green hills. They imported 30 tons of authentic Taklimakan sand and used heaters and dehumidifiers to recreate the desert's harsh climate, allowing people to experience a landscape so alien to these misty islands that it might as well be from the moon.
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Amid mounting criticism at home and abroad, a member of Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita's Cabinet resigned Friday over his remark that Japan was not an aggressor in World War II but was fighting Asian colonization by the "white race." Seisuke Okuno, who has served in the ministerial post of land agency chief since November, left the Cabinet reluctantly after China and South Korea condemned the comment and opposition parties in Japan demanded his dismissal.
WORLD
May 4, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,000 years after the death of samurai Masakado Taira, executives, homemakers and multinational corporations still worship and appease his vengeful ghost. Each day, residents leave food, mementos and money at his stone monument, wedged between skyscrapers in Tokyo's financial district. "As far as I know, he's the only ghost in Japan with his own bank account, which is now worth around $190,000," Masakado Preservation Society Chairman Tatsuzo Endo said.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local school districts across Japan voted with their order books Wednesday when they rejected by an overwhelming majority the use of a controversial middle school textbook that has inflamed passions across Asia. The book, "The New History Textbook," by the conservative Fusosha Publishing Co., was turned down by at least 532 of the 542 municipal school districts in Japan, according to unofficial results released by national broadcaster NHK.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean President Kim Dae Jung refused to meet a high-level Japanese delegation in a show of anger over Tokyo's refusal to revise controversial history textbooks. In April, Japan approved a middle school book written by nationalist scholars who deny that Japan committed historically documented atrocities during World War II. Seoul formally asked Tokyo to revise 35 passages that it believes gloss over atrocities committed by Japan from 1910 to 1945.
NEWS
July 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The publisher of a controversial history textbook that many Asians say whitewashes Japan's wartime atrocities offered to revise several passages, including some parts that South Korea wants expunged. The Education Ministry approved the middle school text in April. It was written by nationalist scholars who deny Japan committed historically documented atrocities during World War II and who say teaching youngsters about Japan's war crimes is "masochistic."
NEWS
June 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
A history textbook that has outraged many Asians who say it whitewashes Japanese atrocities of the early 20th century hit bookstores Monday. The publisher said it had decided to release the book to the public now in an effort to ease criticism by letting people read it for themselves. "We decided it would be best to release the book and let readers decide. We feel we've been criticized unfairly," said Toshiaki Shirasawa of Fusosha, which published "New History Textbook."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chanting, "Japan, apologize," and "Japan, tell the truth," more than 200 Asian American protesters Tuesday demanded that the Japanese government pull back new history textbooks that they say whitewash Japan's crimes against its neighbors before and during World War II.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask sixth-graders here about Japanese comic books, and their eyes light up. Slam Dunk, a macho basketball player, is hot, says one boy. So are Dragon Ball, a futuristic space warrior, and Dr. Slump, a mad scientist who designed the perfect robot girl. Japanese comics deliver the ultimate in thrills, chills and "interesting stuff with girls, like nakedness," he said. "We all like Japanese comics better, because Korean comics are too sissy."
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here today for a controversial state visit that is arousing intense emotions in both Japan and South Korea over the bitter historical legacy shared by the Asian neighbors. Roh set the tone of his three-day visit on May 14 when he told Japanese reporters in Seoul that he hopes Emperor Akihito will make a clear-cut apology to South Koreans for Japan's 1910-1945 colonization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | BRIAN BERGSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They sat for decades in a cardboard box in a Kansas garage, souvenirs an American serviceman had grabbed from the body of a Japanese kamikaze pilot whose plane had slammed deep into an aircraft carrier in the Pacific. A pocket watch. A piece of a parachute harness. A letter written in Japanese. To the American, Robert Schock, the items were gruesome reminders of the horrors he had witnessed in World War II and of the 1945 suicide attack that killed nearly 400 people aboard the Bunker Hill.
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