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June 6, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
After 10 months of backbreaking labor and physical abuse, Reuben sits in a narrow hallway with a grubby linoleum floor and a row of closed doors, which the investigative division of the Immigration Bureau uses as a waiting room. He is exhausted and disoriented, but he laughs at the sign on the wall, hand-lettered in clumsy English by a Japanese bureaucrat: "We don't accept your surrender today."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alien hardships Made bearable by the hope I hold for my children .
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NEWS
March 18, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government is failing to protect scores of possible political refugees fleeing threats to their lives or freedom, in flagrant disregard of a United Nations pact that it signed, Amnesty International concluded in a report released Wednesday. In the scathing document, the London-based human rights organization said Japan has at times obstructed the fundamental right to apply for political asylum, failed to act on asylum requests and refused applicants access to attorneys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan on Tuesday stopped requiring French visitors to obtain visas, a day after Paris exempted Japan and Canada from stringent immigration measures introduced in 1986 to fight terrorism. Japan started asking French nationals for visas after France imposed visa requirements for all countries except European Community states, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Nearly 700,000 Japanese visted France last year. The Ministry of Tourism said Tuesday that this figure could rise to 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
A third-generation Korean resident of Japan landed Tuesday in Tokyo on a flight from Los Angeles after earlier being barred from Japan because she had refused to be fingerprinted as an alien. Choi Sun Ae, a 28-year-old graduate student, was allowed into the country on a special 180-day visa, according to immigration officers at Tokyo's Narita airport. Choi, who was born in Japan, is not recognized by the Japanese government as a citizen because her parents are Korean.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From The Washington Post
The Japanese government has announced it will begin repatriating Chinese "boat people" and said the first 301 will be sent back today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said the 301 are among 1,668 Chinese who illegally entered Japan this year by posing as Vietnamese "boat people." Most came seeking employment in prosperous Japan and cannot be considered genuine political refugees, Japanese officials said.
NEWS
September 28, 1989
More than 230 people arrived in Okinawa, Japan's southernmost island, in a 50-ton wooden boat, the first "boat people" to land in Japan since an unprecedented influx forced the government two weeks ago to tighten its policy on who will be accepted as refugees. Most of those aboard were young men, but young mothers and about 12 children were also on the boat.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance encounter on a suburban train one recent Sunday sheds some awkward light on the elusive problem of racism in Japan. It began when a little Japanese girl pointed with fascination at a black woman and asked, "Daddy, what's that?" The father squirmed with embarrassment. He tried to satisfy the innocent curiosity of his preschool daughter by reminding her of an old Chinese fable known in Japan as "Saiyuki."
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | Reuters
Japan will send about 300 Chinese "boat people" back to their homeland later this month, the Foreign Ministry said Monday. Beijing had agreed to accept the Chinese to be sent aboard a Chinese-chartered ship, a ministry spokesman said. Since last May, 3,110 Chinese refugees have arrived in Japan claiming to be Vietnamese refugees, the spokesman said.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance encounter on a suburban train one recent Sunday sheds some awkward light on the elusive problem of racism in Japan. It began when a little Japanese girl pointed with fascination at a black woman and asked, "Daddy, what's that?" The father squirmed with embarrassment. He tried to satisfy the innocent curiosity of his preschool daughter by reminding her of an old Chinese fable known in Japan as "Saiyuki."
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From The Washington Post
The Japanese government has announced it will begin repatriating Chinese "boat people" and said the first 301 will be sent back today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said the 301 are among 1,668 Chinese who illegally entered Japan this year by posing as Vietnamese "boat people." Most came seeking employment in prosperous Japan and cannot be considered genuine political refugees, Japanese officials said.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | Reuters
Japan will send about 300 Chinese "boat people" back to their homeland later this month, the Foreign Ministry said Monday. Beijing had agreed to accept the Chinese to be sent aboard a Chinese-chartered ship, a ministry spokesman said. Since last May, 3,110 Chinese refugees have arrived in Japan claiming to be Vietnamese refugees, the spokesman said.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exclusivist Japan suddenly has become a beacon of hope for tens of thousands of poor Asians. A year ago, the number of illegal foreign workers in Japan was about 100,000. But now, "it may be as many as 300,000," said Mitsuaki Yoshimen, who heads a Labor Ministry unit dealing with foreign workers. "We don't know what the real number is. It keeps increasing steadily." Police are arresting and deporting illegal foreign workers at a rate of more than 18,000 a year.
NEWS
September 28, 1989
More than 230 people arrived in Okinawa, Japan's southernmost island, in a 50-ton wooden boat, the first "boat people" to land in Japan since an unprecedented influx forced the government two weeks ago to tighten its policy on who will be accepted as refugees. Most of those aboard were young men, but young mothers and about 12 children were also on the boat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Japan on Tuesday stopped requiring French visitors to obtain visas, a day after Paris exempted Japan and Canada from stringent immigration measures introduced in 1986 to fight terrorism. Japan started asking French nationals for visas after France imposed visa requirements for all countries except European Community states, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Nearly 700,000 Japanese visted France last year. The Ministry of Tourism said Tuesday that this figure could rise to 1.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exclusivist Japan suddenly has become a beacon of hope for tens of thousands of poor Asians. A year ago, the number of illegal foreign workers in Japan was about 100,000. But now, "it may be as many as 300,000," said Mitsuaki Yoshimen, who heads a Labor Ministry unit dealing with foreign workers. "We don't know what the real number is. It keeps increasing steadily." Police are arresting and deporting illegal foreign workers at a rate of more than 18,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
A third-generation Korean resident of Japan landed Tuesday in Tokyo on a flight from Los Angeles after earlier being barred from Japan because she had refused to be fingerprinted as an alien. Choi Sun Ae, a 28-year-old graduate student, was allowed into the country on a special 180-day visa, according to immigration officers at Tokyo's Narita airport. Choi, who was born in Japan, is not recognized by the Japanese government as a citizen because her parents are Korean.
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