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BUSINESS
April 24, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as officials here are to offer details today of their $124-billion plan to jolt this nation out of its economic doldrums, a controversial new report argues that unless Japan takes quick and drastic action, it is headed for a long period of deflation and decline. "We conclude that the long-term prospects for growth are poor," says the report by David Asher, an Oxford University Japan scholar, and Andrew Smithers, chairman of Smithers & Co., an economic consultant in London.
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NEWS
March 28, 1999 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the mountains, they strip bark from graceful fir forests and gobble alpine flowers. In the valleys, farmers curse them for trampling fields and eating crops. An explosion in the deer population has become rural Japan's biggest natural headache. Now a growing group of wildlife experts say that they have the natural remedy: wild wolves.
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NEWS
April 2, 1987 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Nearly five years after it became the first Japanese auto maker to produce cars in the United States, Honda is now on the verge of becoming the first to reverse the tide and export American-built cars to Japan. Honda, which last year surpassed Toyota to become the top-selling Japanese car company in the United States, plans to export cars from its giant Marysville, Ohio, assembly complex back to Japan within the next two to three years if the exchange rate between the Japanese yen and the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as officials here are to offer details today of their $124-billion plan to jolt this nation out of its economic doldrums, a controversial new report argues that unless Japan takes quick and drastic action, it is headed for a long period of deflation and decline. "We conclude that the long-term prospects for growth are poor," says the report by David Asher, an Oxford University Japan scholar, and Andrew Smithers, chairman of Smithers & Co., an economic consultant in London.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | From Reuters
Sales of imported cars in Japan may soar in the next five years to as many as 350,000 cars a year, or three times current demand and 10% of the total market, industry analysts say. "West German car manufacturers, which now control about 70% of the imported car market, are likely to profit the most," said spokesman Ken Kano at the Japan Automobile Importers Assn. He said U.S. car makers now hold 10% of the lucrative Japanese import market. "But I expect the U.S. share to increase . . .
NEWS
April 11, 1985
Japanese college football coaches will receive a firsthand look at American coaching techniques when two Claremont-Mudd-Scripps coaches visit the Orient from April 19 through May 8. John Zinda, Claremont-Mudd-Scripps football coach and athletic director, and Mike Maynard, a football assistant, will be consultants for the Doshisha University Wild Rovers of Kyoto and will lead coaching clinics.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | United Press International
The U.S. rice industry asked the government today to put its weight behind the industry's charge that Japan unfairly restricts rice imports, and to force Japan to give 10% of its market to imports. The request was filed in the form of the first Section 301 petition under the new trade law. U.S. Trade Ambassador Clayton Yeutter will have 45 days to decide whether the complaint is justified--a deadline that falls just before the presidential election.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1988 | TODD J. GILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
The latest import from Japan hit Northern California on Tuesday, but this is no high-tech competitor for Silicon Valley. From the land of small cars, computer chips and Godzilla comes WOOZ, the human maze. Hoping to expand a fad that has seen more than 100 maze amusement parks built in Japan since 1984, Sun Creative System Inc. opened a three-maze complex in Vacaville, about halfway between San Francisco and Sacramento on Interstate 80.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | From Times wire services
Sales of imported vehicles in Japan surged over 60% in March from a year earlier to a record for the month of 25,943, the Japan Automobile Importers Assn. said Thursday. Sales of cars with engines over 2,000 cubic centimeters nearly doubled, as West German manufacturers continued to lead the pack in overall sales, association figures showed. Volkswagen and its Audi subsidiary scored the biggest total, selling 7,264 cars in the month, up nearly 40% from a year earlier.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | Reuters
Japan has suspended imports of French mushrooms after finding some contaminated by radiation, an official of the Ministry of Health and Welfare said Wednesday. Japan has been testing imported food from Europe since the April, 1986, accident at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in the Soviet Union, when a reactor melted down and spewed radioactivity into the atmosphere, the spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
Swing is bustin' out all over in roots-rock revivalist circles, and The Big 6, a jumpin' band of '50s-infatuated young English boppers, is an infectious new bloom on the rockabilly rosebush. Versatility is the hallmark of this all-star combo drawn from various bands, with an otherwise shifting lineup built around core members Ricky Lee Brawn on drums, honking baritone sax man Nick Lunt and Pat Reyford, an animated, fun-loving singer who plays a hot guitar.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The next American car to penetrate the Japanese market will come not from the Big Three, but from an ailing sugar town on the island of Hawaii. And the vehicle won't use gasoline. YB Planning Inc. of Tokyo signed a joint venture agreement in late February with Suntera, the Solar Electric Chariot Co. of Hawaii, to import up to 2,000 SunRays to Japan over the next 1 1/2 years. The first 200 of the innovative electric mini-cars are to be delivered by this fall.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1995 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's trade deficit in goods and services soared 43% last year to $108.1 billion, the Commerce Department reported Friday, reflecting growing trade gaps with Japan and China and a recovering U.S. economy's ravenous appetite for imports. For trade in goods alone, the United States toted up a record-setting deficit of $166.3 billion, despite some improvement in December, officials said. The goods figure, known as the merchandise trade deficit, shot up from $132.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa Tuesday pleaded for the nation's patience amid a growing uproar over imported rice that may threaten the government's ability to keep control of Japan's highly regulated rice market. Emergency imports of rice to make up for a poor domestic harvest last year have instead prompted an artificial shortage, provoking chaos both in distribution and at the policy level.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Japan, whose closed rice market has become a symbol of unfair trade, announced Thursday that it will open its doors for emergency imports amid the most disastrous crops in nearly 50 years. Officials said this does not change Japan's long-term ban on rice imports, a position immediately criticized by California's rice industry. But the emergency action is likely to prove a onetime boon to California growers, who are saddled with surpluses that have depressed prices.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1993 | From Times staff and wire reports
Unseasonably cold, wet weather is expected to damage Japan's 1993 rice crop and could force the government to slaughter a sacred cow--its ban on foreign rice imports. That could mean at least temporary gains for California rice growers. The Agriculture Ministry has forecast that the 1993 rice harvest would fall to 9.6 million metric tons from an average annual yield of 10.3 million tons, a Japanese newspaper reported.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
Japan, the world's largest consumer of ivory, will ban ivory imports from Africa next week, the International Trade and Industry Ministry said today. Masahiko Isono, a ministry official, said the ban will last at least until the end of the year. Japan has been under pressure to ban imports of ivory products to protect elephants, which are hunted for their ivory tusks. The United States, Britain, France and West Germany have banned ivory imports.
NEWS
June 25, 1985 | Associated Press
The Japanese government today announced tariff reductions on more than 1,800 products, most taking effect next year, and said it is willing to discuss abolishing tariffs on all manufactured goods. "This decision is only a first step," Toshio Komoto, state minister for external economic relations, told a news conference after cuts of 20% or more were announced on customs levies on a range of agricultural and manufactured products.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1991 | From Reuters
The European Community gave a green light Friday to a plan to limit car imports from Japan until the year 2000, but Tokyo has to approve it, diplomats said. The plan, approved at a special meeting of the ambassadors of the EC's 12 member states, would allow Japanese penetration of the lucrative EC market to rise to 16% by the end of 1999 from the current 11%. The deal is aimed at giving the European car industry a breathing space before facing unfettered Japanese competition.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Imported car sales increased 1.3% in September from a year before to 18,751 units, a record for the month, the Japan Automobile Import Assn. said today. Strong demand for imported luxury cars continued to boost sales figures, extending the streak of increases to 81 consecutive months, the association said. Brisk sales of Honda and Toyota models made in the United States pushed up sales of American cars 43.4% over a year ago, topping 2,353 units.
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