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BUSINESS
December 23, 1993 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The machine-tool industry--the business that makes machines which make other machines--might call it "Fadal Attraction." Fadal Engineering Co., a 33-year-old family-owned business, has bolted out of the blue to almost single-handedly overtake the Japanese in a portion of the market that they dominated for most of the 1980s.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Hugo Martin, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. Only days before the one-year anniversary of the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, a report by a global travel trade group predicted that Japan's tourism industry will make a full recovery in 2012. The World Travel and Tourism Council issued a report Wednesday, predicting that international tourism will generate $129 billion in spending in Japan in 2012, compared with $128.5 billion generated in 2010.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In all the furor over Japanese officials mouthing off about U.S. workers and managers, less notice has been taken--on this side of the Pacific anyway--of the economic troubles bubbling up in Japan and of pressures on Japanese companies and industries. Those pressures are very real and could explain why the normally reserved Japanese have begun to sound arrogant, ill-informed and boorish--like their nemesis, Lee A. Iacocca of Chrysler.
WORLD
March 23, 2011 | By John M. Glionna and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
Standing on the deck of his 91-foot trawler, veteran fisherman Tomoyuki Kondou winces over reports that radioactivity from Japan's damaged nuclear power plant in nearby Fukushima has contaminated the local food supply after this month's deadly earthquake and tsunami. The bespectacled third-generation angler has heard the warnings that milk, spinach and other vegetables grown around the plant have been found to contain traces of the radioactive isotopes iodine-131 and cesium-137. Now Kondou and others in Kesennuma worry that radiation from the seaside nuclear plant might also affect the region's long-bustling fishing industry, which provides tuna, oysters, shark, squid and seaweed to restaurants and supermarkets throughout Japan and around the world.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the high-tech dazzle of an economic superpower, the people in this small seaside village still labor by hand and worry that their livelihoods may become obsolete. One of the most prominent local industries--glove making--is struggling to survive amid a labor shortage, the yen's appreciation and brisk competition from China, the Philippines and other countries with low-cost labor. "Everyone is wondering, 'What shall we do?'
BUSINESS
June 19, 1996 | TOM PETRUNO
If the Japanese economy is re-accelerating--at long last--does that make the Japanese stock market a screaming buy? Tuesday's report that Japan's gross domestic product shot up at a 12.7% annualized rate in the first quarter, sharply above expectations, was almost overshadowed by the still-unfolding Sumitomo Corp. copper-trading scandal. But over time, the Sumitomo debacle will amount to a mere blip.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bank Chief Says Kobe Quake Won't Undermine Recovery: Industrial production is returning to pre-earthquake levels, Bank of Japan Gov. Yasuo Matsushita said, and consumer spending, which dropped after the devastating temblor last month, is recovering.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Carrier Corp. in Joint Venture: The air conditioner giant, a unit of United Technologies Corp., has signed a $10-million joint venture contract with Vietnam's Ree Refrigeration Corp. to make air conditioners in the country, Ree said. Ree Refrigeration said production will start next year at a plant in Ho Chi Minh City, where Ree has two factories. The joint venture company, to be known as Carrier Vietnam Air Conditioning Co.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angered by a report that Japan's purchase of foreign semiconductors has continued to slide to well below its 20%-of-market target, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor called Monday for emergency talks between the two nations next month. "This latest share number raises serious concerns regarding Japan's commitment to fully implement the Semiconductor Arrangement," Kantor said in a statement issued in Washington.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2010 | Yuriko Nagano
Aya Yokura spends her days hunched over white sheets of paper, drawing intricately costumed characters whose creation can be painstaking and time-consuming. For the last two years, she has spent up to 100 hours a week at her workstation — a low-paying, labor-intensive job that helps bring Japan's famous style of animated cartoons to life. Although the 26-year-old earns only about $10,000 a year and lives with her mom to make ends meet, she and a few thousand Japanese artists like her fill a crucial role in the technical process of creating this visual entertainment form, known as anime.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Japan's industrial production rose for a second month as manufacturers increased output of automobiles and electronics parts in anticipation of higher demand overseas and at home. Industrial production climbed a seasonally adjusted 1.5% in April from March, the trade ministry said in a report in Tokyo today. The median forecast of 40 economists surveyed by Bloomberg News was for a 1.8% gain. Rising demand for Japanese automobiles and electronics in the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | Reuters
Japan's industrial output declined in May for a third straight month, government data showed, underscoring the view that the world's second-largest economy is flirting with a recession. The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry said industrial output fell a seasonally adjusted 1.2% in May from the previous month, even after a 2% drop in April. That was worse than a median forecast of a 0.4% fall in a Reuters survey of 18 economists last week.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Takeshi Sugino, a designer for the Mitsubishi Group, has spent 29 years thinking about how to create better machines for people's laundry. Several years ago, though, he and two colleagues were taken to a large concrete room near Osaka and told to smash, tear and otherwise destroy the 200 washing machines inside. "It was very hard work," Sugino says. "They were old and dirty, with lots of bugs inside. The only fun part was finding change that had fallen out of people's pockets."
BUSINESS
April 2, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Japanese business confidence fell for the first time in 2 1/2 years in the first quarter, the Bank of Japan's Tankan survey showed today. The main index of large manufacturers confidence fell to minus 5 last month, down from 10 in December. Economists had expected the index to fall to 1. The report sent the yen to a new 2 1/2-year low against the dollar, at 126.55 yen, versus 126.33 Friday in New York.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever he wants to make his legendary Olympic equipment, master craftsman Masahisa Tsujitani simply heads downstairs to a workshop about the size of a two-car garage. The 67-year-old hunches over his lathe and, with the skilled eye of a jeweler, the steady hand of a surgeon and the seasoning of an athlete, grinds the cast-iron mass into a sphere with grooves almost as fine as a fingerprint.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the prime of this tiny island in Japan's Inland Sea, the workday began like a crescendo of cicadas in song, as thousands of hammers pounded nails into the hulls of wooden ships. In later years, as iron replaced wood, the cacophony grew even louder. The islanders were the premier producers of Japan's domestic fleets of cargo ships, tankers and dredging vessels. "It was noisy, yet it was prosperous and thriving," said island historian Hitoshi Fujimoto, 73.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every January, like his father before him, Hiroaki Hamada begins hoisting his barnacled oyster traps out of these aquamarine waters to harvest the treasures within: lustrous, warm-hued pearls that are considered the world's very finest. Except that this month, nearly half of his akoya oysters were dead on arrival at the dock. And many of the survivors were shriveled, yielding dull or discolored pearls.
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