Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Labor Relations
IN THE NEWS

Japan Labor Relations

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan should strengthen its equal-employment law by banning firms from selectively hiring men over women and easing restrictions on women's overtime and late-night work, a Labor Ministry committee said Monday. The recommendations tackle the most visible signs here of sexist employment practices, which have become even more conspicuous during the recession. In an effort to cut costs, many firms have drastically scaled back new hiring--in large part by cutting back on female workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997
AFL-CIO President John Sweeney travels to Asia this weekend for meetings with labor leaders in Hong Kong and Japan. One of the main goals is to pressure the Japanese firms that own and manage the downtown Los Angeles New Otani Hotel & Garden, which has resisted a union-organizing drive by Local 11 of the Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union. Sweeney will also participate in an annual bilateral meeting with leaders of Japan's labor federation.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 3, 1997
AFL-CIO President John Sweeney travels to Asia this weekend for meetings with labor leaders in Hong Kong and Japan. One of the main goals is to pressure the Japanese firms that own and manage the downtown Los Angeles New Otani Hotel & Garden, which has resisted a union-organizing drive by Local 11 of the Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union. Sweeney will also participate in an annual bilateral meeting with leaders of Japan's labor federation.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan may battle efforts to bring in more things American--everything from computer chips and automobile parts to beef and fresh fruit. But when it came to dealing with what critics call a crushing social problem here involving this nation's biggest companies, some Japanese women played a surprising gambit: They turned to a U.S. import.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, Japan doesn't look like a nation suffering from a scarcity of workers. Houses here are still custom-built in the most labor-intensive manner imaginable--using lumber from thousands of tiny, inefficient mills. Department stores station women with high-pitched voices to greet customers in elevators and in front of escalators.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan may battle efforts to bring in more things American--everything from computer chips and automobile parts to beef and fresh fruit. But when it came to dealing with what critics call a crushing social problem here involving this nation's biggest companies, some Japanese women played a surprising gambit: They turned to a U.S. import.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1986 | Harry Bernstein
Some of the more daring leaders of American corporations and unions are improving their relations so quickly that they are leapfrogging Japan's often-praised style of management. Admirers of the industrial achievements of that economic juggernaut, resource-poor Japan, often contend that our productivity would soar and labor costs decline if only U.S. managers could instill in their workers the same intense sense of company loyalty and dedication to work that the Japanese have.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan should strengthen its equal-employment law by banning firms from selectively hiring men over women and easing restrictions on women's overtime and late-night work, a Labor Ministry committee said Monday. The recommendations tackle the most visible signs here of sexist employment practices, which have become even more conspicuous during the recession. In an effort to cut costs, many firms have drastically scaled back new hiring--in large part by cutting back on female workers.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, Japan doesn't look like a nation suffering from a scarcity of workers. Houses here are still custom-built in the most labor-intensive manner imaginable--using lumber from thousands of tiny, inefficient mills. Department stores station women with high-pitched voices to greet customers in elevators and in front of escalators.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|