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NEWS
January 16, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The normally sleepy neighborhood of Isezaki has been in a frenzy since Fumihiro Joyu, a top leader of the Aum Supreme Truth sect responsible for a deadly 1995 nerve gas attack in the Tokyo subway, took refuge here after his recent release from prison. Right-wing groups patrol the streets surrounding the nine-story apartment building where Joyu is holed up, their sound trucks blaring anti-Aum pronouncements. Men with bullhorns stand outside the building shouting, "Joyu, get out!
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WORLD
July 26, 2003 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
Despite growing public unease and a last-minute scramble by opponents to put up roadblocks, Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party rammed a controversial bill through parliament early today that allows the government to send peacekeeping troops to Iraq. Passage of the bill was a big win for Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who backed the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq and advocates a more global role for Japanese peacekeeping troops. U.S.
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NEWS
June 30, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumie Suzuki was 21 when she was found to have leprosy. Her family locked her in a room and slid her food through the doorway. After a year, she was exiled to an isolated leprosarium. Alone, she made the journey to a colony to which no roads led, stumbling on her weak, nerve-damaged legs. Her mother's parting words were: "Never come back. And die quickly."
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen Asian women, forced into sex slavery by the Japanese army during World War II, sued the government of Japan Monday, seeking unspecified but substantial damages for years of rape, beating, starvation and other forms of mistreatment that continue to haunt them into old age. Lawyers in the case said that it is the first suit filed in U.S. courts directly against the Japanese government for war crimes.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four months after Chinese troops bloodily suppressed pro-democracy demonstrations in Beijing's Tien An Men Square, the headquarters of Yaohan International moved from the sleepy countryside town of Numazu, Japan, to Hong Kong. The decision made Yaohan the only Japanese company listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange to have moved its international headquarters overseas. Yaohan Chairman Kazuo Wada, 62, said the move was religiously inspired.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the monstrous worship hall of the Rissho Kosei Kai, busloads of believers alight to behold wiggling cheerleaders in purple sequins, band members pounding out the bouncy strains of "Anchors Aweigh" and a gleaming gold Buddha with bright blue curls. On a street corner here in Japan's capital, two women approach strangers and offer to cure their health problems with divine energy emanating from their open palms in a ministry called the Assn. to Make Clear the Love of God.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Depending on who you talk to, insider trading is rampant--or nonexistent--in Japan. In either case, authorities are now taking steps to ensure that investors here understand that trading stocks on confidential information is not acceptable. An advisory committee to the Ministry of Finance is scheduled to unveil today a proposal to revise Japan's securities laws to that end.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Choi Sun-ae hopes to board a plane in Los Angeles today and go home to Japan. But she does not know whether she will be allowed to re-enter her country. She has no entry permit. Choi, a 28-year-old graduate student at Indiana University, was born in Japan. She is, in fact, a third-generation Japanese. But she has no Japanese passport because Japanese law does not recognize her as a citizen. In her native Japan, Choi is legally a Korean.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | DAVID COLKER, Times Staff Writer
Herb Ritts, the superstar celebrity photographer, can offer a graphic lesson in how censorship in Japan affects the art world to anyone who takes a few steps into the gallery showing his first solo exhibition. Taking up much of a wall, just opposite the front door of the Fahey-Klein Gallery in Hollywood, is "Male Nude With Bubble," a mural-sized photograph of a naked model standing behind a large floating soap bubble.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew is a bouncy 14-month-old with an engaging grin and a warm home with an adopted family in a hamlet 100 miles northwest of Tokyo. But he lacks one treasure most people take for granted: a country. Born in the seamy world of sex and gangsters, Andrew is the product of a suspected tryst between a Filipino bar hostess and a Japanese client. Both of his birth parents have disappeared. As a result, neither the Japanese nor the Philippine government will grant him citizenship.
NEWS
January 16, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The normally sleepy neighborhood of Isezaki has been in a frenzy since Fumihiro Joyu, a top leader of the Aum Supreme Truth sect responsible for a deadly 1995 nerve gas attack in the Tokyo subway, took refuge here after his recent release from prison. Right-wing groups patrol the streets surrounding the nine-story apartment building where Joyu is holed up, their sound trucks blaring anti-Aum pronouncements. Men with bullhorns stand outside the building shouting, "Joyu, get out!
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier this year, a random sampling of "women only" classified job postings in major Japanese newspapers was limited mostly to low-end positions for nurses, housekeepers, textile workers and food-service employees. "We need many more women," proclaimed one railway noodle stand company in the March 18 edition of the Asahi Shimbun newspaper. "We need women under 25," said a more specific posting for secretaries in the Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan's largest newspaper.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | Reuters
Japanese doctors prepared today to carry out the nation's first heart transplant in 31 years. The potential donor, a 44-year-old woman who suffered a cerebral hemorrhage, would be the nation's first organ donor legally defined as brain-dead under a 1997 law. The donor's heart, lungs, liver and kidneys will be quickly transplanted in recipients selected by the Japan Organ Transplant Network.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
With a new law allowing organ transplants, the nation joins the rest of the industrialized world in recognizing brain death, but cultural attitudes, a lack of donors and a scarcity of medical experience will continue to place major organ transplants off limits for many Japanese. Under the old law, death came at the moment the heart stopped beating. But at that point, it is too late to use many organs for transplants.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government said it doesn't plan to apologize or compensate more than 16,000 disabled women who were forcibly sterilized over five decades. The program was legal at the time and documented in public records, the government said. An official said the government does not plan to further investigate the program. Japan legalized sterilization in 1948. Under the law, revoked last year, doctors did not need consent to sterilize the mentally or physically disabled.
NEWS
February 22, 1997 | ELIZABETH LAZAROWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today's Japanese women can surf the Internet, run for parliament and drive bulldozers, but they can't take birth control pills. That could change soon. Thirty years after vetoing the use of contraceptive pills, a government committee is expected to announce next week whether it will recommend legalization of the low-dose birth control pill. The Japanese media predict that the pill will at last prevail.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1996
U.S. to Take Japan Case to WTO: Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said Japan's unwillingness to protect U.S. sound recordings produced before 1971 is a breach of the 1993 Uruguay Round trade accord. "We're deeply concerned that Japan has not implemented regulations or laws that would satisfy their obligations under the Uruguay Round," Kantor said. "We have asked Japan to do so, they have failed."
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the support of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's coalition and opposition Liberal Democrats, Parliament's upper house today made final the enactment of Japan's most drastic political reforms since the post-World War II occupation era. The laws enacted today fill in enforcement dates omitted from an eleventh-hour, stop-gap passage of the bills Jan. 29.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far from the center of Japan's ruling elite, local citizens are rising up against the political establishment in a spreading wave of direct democracy reaching from mountain towns to balmy beach areas. Next month, residents of Makimachi in Niigata prefecture vote on whether to allow a nuclear power plant in their town. In September, Okinawans will vote on whether they support a reduction in the U.S.
NEWS
June 30, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fumie Suzuki was 21 when she was found to have leprosy. Her family locked her in a room and slid her food through the doorway. After a year, she was exiled to an isolated leprosarium. Alone, she made the journey to a colony to which no roads led, stumbling on her weak, nerve-damaged legs. Her mother's parting words were: "Never come back. And die quickly."
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