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Japan Meteorological Agency

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WORLD
August 18, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A powerful 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck Friday off Japan's northeast coast, prompting officials to issue a brief tsunami advisory warning for two coastal prefectures already devastated by the March 11 temblor and tsunami. No damage or injuries have been reported, and the tsunami advisory was lifted after no waves were sighted. Still, in the moments after the quake, some highways were closed and some bullet trains halted in a nation still skittish over the March disaster. Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that runs the ailing Fukushima Daichi plant, said no danger signals had been detected from monitoring posts at the facility, which was damaged in the March disaster.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A 7.1-magnitude earthquake off the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on Friday morning Pacific time did not trigger a tsunami warning for California or Hawaii. Strong earthquakes near Japan often have Hawaiians and those on the California coast worried about possible tsunamis on their own coasts. The earthquake was measured Friday morning Pacific time, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. It was initially listed at magnitude 7.3, but later revised downward. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center  released an advisory  saying that "based on all available data a destructive Pacific-wide tsunami is not expected and there is no tsunami threat to Hawaii.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
A 7.1-magnitude earthquake off the east coast of Honshu, Japan, on Friday morning Pacific time did not trigger a tsunami warning for California or Hawaii. Strong earthquakes near Japan often have Hawaiians and those on the California coast worried about possible tsunamis on their own coasts. The earthquake was measured Friday morning Pacific time, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. It was initially listed at magnitude 7.3, but later revised downward. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center  released an advisory  saying that "based on all available data a destructive Pacific-wide tsunami is not expected and there is no tsunami threat to Hawaii.
WORLD
August 18, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A powerful 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck Friday off Japan's northeast coast, prompting officials to issue a brief tsunami advisory warning for two coastal prefectures already devastated by the March 11 temblor and tsunami. No damage or injuries have been reported, and the tsunami advisory was lifted after no waves were sighted. Still, in the moments after the quake, some highways were closed and some bullet trains halted in a nation still skittish over the March disaster. Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that runs the ailing Fukushima Daichi plant, said no danger signals had been detected from monitoring posts at the facility, which was damaged in the March disaster.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
An international aid effort swelled Monday to help Japan deal with the trio of catastrophes that have mired the country in sorrow and fear. More than 90 nations have offered assistance in searching for survivors and extracting the dead from Friday's magnitude 8.9 earthquake, the devastating tsunami it spawned and the threat of radiation contamination emanating from three damaged reactors in the hard-hit northeast. The aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan arrived in Japan to augment a fleet of U.S. naval vessels deployed to help with air rescue operations and to ferry relief supplies to the hundreds of thousands displaced by the disasters.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The enormity of the human toll from Japan's worst earthquake in recorded history pressed persistently into the consciousness of the island nation's rattled citizens as rescue workers extracted thousands more bodies from the coastal wastelands that were once thriving communities. More than 1,000 bodies washed ashore Monday in Miyagi prefecture, the northeastern area hardest hit by the magnitude 8.9 quake that struck offshore on Friday and the devastating tsunami it triggered. Search-and-rescue crews, now finding few survivors among the waterlogged debris, extracted about 2,000 corpses on the fourth day of the disaster that Prime Minister Naoto Kan has proclaimed Japan's greatest national tragedy since World War II. Confronted with an escalating threat from three reactors at a nuclear power plant damaged by the earthquake, Kan's government turned to the International Atomic Energy Agency with an appeal for "expert missions" to help avert major releases of radioactivity.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Friday's earthquake off the eastern coast of Japan was upgraded to a magnitude 9.0 by the Japan Meteorological Agency, the Kyodo News agency reported Sunday. The agency's scientists probably had access to new data, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Susan Hough. "If they've upgraded, I expect USGS might follow suit," she said, adding that it was not unusual for magnitudes to move up or down by 0.1, because large earthquakes can be tricky to measure. "It's not surgical precision," she said.
WORLD
March 13, 2011 | By Laura King, Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The number of missing and feared dead in Japan's epic earthquake soared Sunday as a reeling nation struggled to contain an unprecedented nuclear crisis, pluck people in tsunami-inundated areas to safety, quell raging blazes and provide aid to hundreds of thousands of frightened people left homeless and dazed. A police chief in the battered Miyagi prefecture told disaster relief officials that he expected the death toll to rise to 10,000 in his prefecture alone, the Kyodo News Agency said.
WORLD
September 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Typhoon Shanshan, with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph, battered Japan's southern Ryukyu island chain, and the Kyodo News service reported two people died after heavy downpours triggered a landslide. The storm was forecast to continue north toward Japan's southwestern main island of Kyushu, where it could make landfall as early as Monday, Japan's Meteorological Agency said. The storm disrupted flights and shipping in the region.
NEWS
September 22, 2001
Japan's Meteorological Agency said a small underwater volcanic eruption took place near the island of Iwo Jima, 800 miles south of Tokyo, where the U.S. military has been holding exercises. "I would describe it as a small-scale volcanic activity," said Keiji Doi, a senior scientific officer for the agency, adding that there were no reports of damage on the island. U.S. military exercises that had begun in the area continued.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The enormity of the human toll from Japan's worst earthquake in recorded history pressed persistently into the consciousness of the island nation's rattled citizens as rescue workers extracted thousands more bodies from the coastal wastelands that were once thriving communities. More than 1,000 bodies washed ashore Monday in Miyagi prefecture, the northeastern area hardest hit by the magnitude 8.9 quake that struck offshore on Friday and the devastating tsunami it triggered. Search-and-rescue crews, now finding few survivors among the waterlogged debris, extracted about 2,000 corpses on the fourth day of the disaster that Prime Minister Naoto Kan has proclaimed Japan's greatest national tragedy since World War II. Confronted with an escalating threat from three reactors at a nuclear power plant damaged by the earthquake, Kan's government turned to the International Atomic Energy Agency with an appeal for "expert missions" to help avert major releases of radioactivity.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
An international aid effort swelled Monday to help Japan deal with the trio of catastrophes that have mired the country in sorrow and fear. More than 90 nations have offered assistance in searching for survivors and extracting the dead from Friday's magnitude 8.9 earthquake, the devastating tsunami it spawned and the threat of radiation contamination emanating from three damaged reactors in the hard-hit northeast. The aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan arrived in Japan to augment a fleet of U.S. naval vessels deployed to help with air rescue operations and to ferry relief supplies to the hundreds of thousands displaced by the disasters.
WORLD
March 13, 2011 | By Laura King, Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The number of missing and feared dead in Japan's epic earthquake soared Sunday as a reeling nation struggled to contain an unprecedented nuclear crisis, pluck people in tsunami-inundated areas to safety, quell raging blazes and provide aid to hundreds of thousands of frightened people left homeless and dazed. A police chief in the battered Miyagi prefecture told disaster relief officials that he expected the death toll to rise to 10,000 in his prefecture alone, the Kyodo News Agency said.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Friday's earthquake off the eastern coast of Japan was upgraded to a magnitude 9.0 by the Japan Meteorological Agency, the Kyodo News agency reported Sunday. The agency's scientists probably had access to new data, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Susan Hough. "If they've upgraded, I expect USGS might follow suit," she said, adding that it was not unusual for magnitudes to move up or down by 0.1, because large earthquakes can be tricky to measure. "It's not surgical precision," she said.
WORLD
March 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
A powerful earthquake hit Japan's southernmost main island of Kyushu today, injuring at least 155 people, causing some houses to collapse and halting trains. The focus of the magnitude 7 quake was off the western coast of Fukuoka prefecture, 550 miles southwest of Tokyo, and the depth was shallow, Japan's meteorological agency said. The quake was felt as far away as Seoul. TV footage from Fukuoka city showed office buildings swaying, broken windows and cracks in the pavement.
WORLD
August 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A magnitude 6.8 earthquake hit between Japan's southernmost islands and the coast of Taiwan today, briefly prompting a tsunami warning, Japan's Meteorological Agency said. The quake struck about 9 a.m. about 80 miles southwest of Ishigaki. The Japanese resort island is about 125 miles east of Taiwan. The quake struck at a depth of about six miles, the agency said. Naoto Otake, a police official on Ishigaki, said there were no immediate reports of damage or casualties on the island, which has a population of 40,000.
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