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NEWS
September 26, 1992 | The Washington Post
The first Japanese military unit to deploy abroad since World War II began arriving here Friday to join a U.N. peacekeeping mission, and its leaders vowed to allay Asians' fears of past Japanese atrocities.
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WORLD
January 13, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
China's recent test flight of a stealth fighter illustrated a worrisome "disconnect" between its military and civilian leaders, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday. The test of the J-20 fighter occurred Tuesday, while Gates was in Beijing. When he inquired about it at a meeting, Chinese President Hu Jintao seemed unaware it had occurred, Pentagon officials said. It was the latest in a series of incidents, including a 2007 anti-satellite missile test and a 2009 confrontation between Chinese vessels and a U.S. surveillance ship in the South China Sea, in which civilian leaders in Beijing appeared unaware or poorly informed about the activities of the armed forces, Gates said.
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OPINION
February 18, 2004
Japan's suffering in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki that ended World War II and the U.S.-written "peace constitution" later imposed on the shattered country gave Tokyo a long allergy to combat. For decades, the constitution, with its renunciation of war, was a reason and excuse to limit Japan's role in rebuilding war-ravaged nations to that of financier. But, in Iraq, that role is about to change dramatically.
NEWS
March 29, 2009 | Eric Talmadge, Talmadge writes for the Associated Press.
Col. Kenji Sawai, commander of Japan's 18th Infantry Regiment, stands in his headquarters dressed from head to foot in white camouflage. Skis clutter the hallways of his outpost in the snow-covered mountains of northern Japan, along with stacks of white ponchos, gloves and boots. For decades, the mission for Japanese officers such as Sawai has been fairly straightforward: Defend the homeland. Narrowly defined, for Sawai and his infantrymen, that means protecting the island of Hokkaido, where the regiment is based, from invasion.
NEWS
August 25, 1988
The chief of Japan's military resigned to take responsibility for the deaths of 30 civilians killed when a submarine collided with a sport fishing vessel last month. "I presented Prime Minister (Noboru) Takeshita with a notice of resignation today, just now," Tsutomu Kawara said at a news conference. Kawara was the first Defense Agency director general in 17 years to relinquish his post in a controversy linked to the armed forces. Takeshita appointed Kichiro Tazawa, 70, to replace Kawara.
NEWS
March 29, 2009 | Eric Talmadge, Talmadge writes for the Associated Press.
Col. Kenji Sawai, commander of Japan's 18th Infantry Regiment, stands in his headquarters dressed from head to foot in white camouflage. Skis clutter the hallways of his outpost in the snow-covered mountains of northern Japan, along with stacks of white ponchos, gloves and boots. For decades, the mission for Japanese officers such as Sawai has been fairly straightforward: Defend the homeland. Narrowly defined, for Sawai and his infantrymen, that means protecting the island of Hokkaido, where the regiment is based, from invasion.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and Japan on Wednesday issued their first joint communique on an international issue in half a century and agreed to regular consultations on political and military affairs. The two steps promised to broaden what officials of both nations have recognized as a narrow and strained relationship. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze proposed, also for the first time, taking certain confidence-building measures to allay Japanese fear of Soviet military power.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He prowls the streets from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., working his personal contacts, exchanging favors for their information. He lends money to young men, takes them to dental appointments, entices them with free rides aboard military aircraft and ships. He approaches teen-agers at train stations and unemployment offices, following them down the street despite the inevitable rebuffs. Hiroyuki Miyashita is polite, personable--and bullishly persistent. He has to be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | MATT SURMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melody Rich doesn't know much Japanese. But she knows some important words: Teishi means "hold," as in don't launch; midori is "green" for go, and shageki-- that's "fire," as in ready, aim, fire. With the arrival of about 250 Japanese soldiers for testing and training at the Point Mugu Naval Air Station this month, shageki is the word that Rich, the base's operations conductor, needs to know.
WORLD
January 13, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
China's recent test flight of a stealth fighter illustrated a worrisome "disconnect" between its military and civilian leaders, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Friday. The test of the J-20 fighter occurred Tuesday, while Gates was in Beijing. When he inquired about it at a meeting, Chinese President Hu Jintao seemed unaware it had occurred, Pentagon officials said. It was the latest in a series of incidents, including a 2007 anti-satellite missile test and a 2009 confrontation between Chinese vessels and a U.S. surveillance ship in the South China Sea, in which civilian leaders in Beijing appeared unaware or poorly informed about the activities of the armed forces, Gates said.
OPINION
February 18, 2004
Japan's suffering in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki that ended World War II and the U.S.-written "peace constitution" later imposed on the shattered country gave Tokyo a long allergy to combat. For decades, the constitution, with its renunciation of war, was a reason and excuse to limit Japan's role in rebuilding war-ravaged nations to that of financier. But, in Iraq, that role is about to change dramatically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | MATT SURMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Melody Rich doesn't know much Japanese. But she knows some important words: Teishi means "hold," as in don't launch; midori is "green" for go, and shageki-- that's "fire," as in ready, aim, fire. With the arrival of about 250 Japanese soldiers for testing and training at the Point Mugu Naval Air Station this month, shageki is the word that Rich, the base's operations conductor, needs to know.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He prowls the streets from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., working his personal contacts, exchanging favors for their information. He lends money to young men, takes them to dental appointments, entices them with free rides aboard military aircraft and ships. He approaches teen-agers at train stations and unemployment offices, following them down the street despite the inevitable rebuffs. Hiroyuki Miyashita is polite, personable--and bullishly persistent. He has to be.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | The Washington Post
The first Japanese military unit to deploy abroad since World War II began arriving here Friday to join a U.N. peacekeeping mission, and its leaders vowed to allay Asians' fears of past Japanese atrocities.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and Japan on Wednesday issued their first joint communique on an international issue in half a century and agreed to regular consultations on political and military affairs. The two steps promised to broaden what officials of both nations have recognized as a narrow and strained relationship. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze proposed, also for the first time, taking certain confidence-building measures to allay Japanese fear of Soviet military power.
NEWS
August 25, 1988
The chief of Japan's military resigned to take responsibility for the deaths of 30 civilians killed when a submarine collided with a sport fishing vessel last month. "I presented Prime Minister (Noboru) Takeshita with a notice of resignation today, just now," Tsutomu Kawara said at a news conference. Kawara was the first Defense Agency director general in 17 years to relinquish his post in a controversy linked to the armed forces. Takeshita appointed Kichiro Tazawa, 70, to replace Kawara.
NEWS
September 24, 1989
Vice President Dan Quayle, who toured two northern Japan military bases on the third day of his Far East visit, said that the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty must not be touched. "Anybody who thinks you ought to tamper, rewrite or modify the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty is wrong," Quayle told reporters during a flight to Chitose and Misawa, the two main air bases guarding northern Japan. Japan's opposition Socialist Party has called for scaling back U.S.-Japan military ties.
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