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Japan National Debt

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BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | MAYUMI OTSUMA, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi pledged today to reduce the country's debt by financing all spending except debt repayment without additional borrowing. In his first policy speech since being elected prime minister, Koizumi said the government will rely on taxes and other revenue to pay for programs, rejecting borrow-and-spend policies that have failed to pull the economy out of a decade-long slump.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | MAYUMI OTSUMA, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi pledged today to reduce the country's debt by financing all spending except debt repayment without additional borrowing. In his first policy speech since being elected prime minister, Koizumi said the government will rely on taxes and other revenue to pay for programs, rejecting borrow-and-spend policies that have failed to pull the economy out of a decade-long slump.
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NEWS
December 13, 1986 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
During two days of testimony on Capitol Hill this week, experts on U.S. economic relations with the Far East gave Congress some advice it probably did not want to hear: The best way to deal with the nation's huge trade deficit is to leave trade policy alone and get serious about the budget deficit. The symposium, organized by Rep. David R. Obey (D-Wis.
NEWS
December 26, 1986 | United Press International
The Japanese government, placing economic and deficit worries ahead of overseas pledges, Thursday announced an austere 1987 national budget proposal that holds down spending increases for defense and foreign aid. The Finance Ministry's draft budget also cut or held the line in all domestic sectors including public works--possibly hampering Japan's effort to respond to international demands that it increase domestic growth to reduce its huge trade surplus.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine that an American city held a referendum on whether to build a billion-dollar dam and residents voted more than 10 to 1 against it--but the government refused to abandon its construction plans. Japan is in a furor over just such a scenario. It began Sunday when residents of the city of Tokushima voted 102,759 to 9,367 against building a dam across the Yoshino River on the island of Shikoku.
NEWS
December 26, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government has been vowing for a decade to move the nation's capital out of overcrowded, overpriced, earthquake-prone Tokyo--but will it really do so? The relocation is dismissed as preposterous by most of the political elite here, including lawmakers who voted for it in 1990 and 1992.
OPINION
May 7, 2000 | Frank Gibney, Frank Gibney, president of the Pacific Basin Institute and professor of politics at Pomona College, is the author of "The Pacific Century: America and Asia in a Changing World."
Whatever the final margins in Japan's June elections, it is highly probable that voters will keep the ruling party in power, thus perpetuating, for all practical purposes, one-party rule since the 1950s. This is not necessarily an Asian phenomenon. Other Asian countries have done away with one-party domination. Thai voters have a choice. Even in post-Suharto Indonesia, recent elections were hotly contested.
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