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NEWS
November 22, 1996 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto and nine other Japanese politicians received a total of $685,000 in donations from groups linked to a bribery scandal, a national newspaper said Thursday. Without citing its sources, the Mainichi Shimbun said Hashimoto's two political organizations received $41,000 between 1990 and 1993 from the groups, which are linked to a nursing home developer who is accused of bribing Health Ministry officials.
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WORLD
January 22, 2008 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Pedigree matters in a country where politics is often a family business. Take a look at the top echelon of Japanese politics: Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda is the son of a prime minister. His predecessor was the grandson of a prime minister. So was the man he defeated to win his party's leadership last fall. And when he looks across the aisle in parliament, he sees yet another second-generation politician leading the opposition. They are just the tip of Japan's hereditary iceberg.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does a prominent Japanese business leader do when he wants his government to revise a law that damages his overseas corporate interests? He might be expected to petition representatives in Parliament or seek the aid of powerful bureaucrats. But in this age of economic interdependence, a new lobbying service is available to reform-minded Japanese: the U.S. Trade Representative's Office in Washington. Akio Morita, chairman of Sony Corp., discovered this last year.
NEWS
May 8, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters, economists and political analysts gave Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi generally high marks Monday for his first address to the nation, in which he outlined his vision of a Japan that would address problems head-on, be more open and stop wasting money on ill-conceived public works projects. "I want to establish an economic and social system suitable for the 21st century," the 59-year-old Koizumi said. In a speech laced with the word "reform," he also vowed to fight special interests.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two centrist opposition leaders who hold the votes to determine who will run Japan's next government informed the country's perennial leaders, the Liberal Democrats, today that they will side with five opposition parties to form an opposition-led coalition. Barring any unpredictable 11th-hour snags, the development appeared to ensure the end of the Liberal Democrats' 38-year rule of Japan.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring a continuing disintegration of Japan's once all-powerful Liberal Democratic Party, the leader of the party's third-largest faction said Sunday he will bolt the party to pursue the post of prime minister. Former Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe, 70, said he and his followers will establish a new party today to seek a partnership with parties in the ruling coalition.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ichiro Ozawa, Japan's most controversial politician--hailed for his strategic vision but reviled for his autocratic style--announced Monday that he will step out from the shadows and run for president of the nation's major opposition party. Ozawa's announcement electrified the Japanese political world and raised hopes that his dynamic leadership and daring policy positions will invigorate the nation's moribund politics and restart a sweeping reform process.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's this? A party at the helm of Japan controlling only 14% of the seats in the lower house of Parliament? Radical left-wingers supporting a coalition with the old conservative stalwarts? Or, most unlikely of all, a Cabinet in which three potential prime ministers hold down the most important posts under a Socialist?
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The maneuvering to form a new government in Japan suddenly took a turn to the right Monday as the Liberal Democratic Party moved to accept political reforms that it rejected in June. Two new conservative opposition groups, which hold the decisive votes in determining whether Japan will be led by a coalition headed by the Liberal Democrats or by a multi-party opposition government, responded by postponing plans to finalize a deal with the other opposition groups.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
Takako Doi, the first woman to lead a major Japanese political party, resigned Friday as head of the Socialists after a frustrating string of political defeats. As chairwoman of Japan's largest opposition party, the charismatic Doi led the Socialists to unprecedented election victories two years ago and was even seen by some as a serious contender for prime minister.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not be Camelot. But the breeze blowing through politics here this week is every bit as refreshing to the average Japanese as was John F. Kennedy's leap to the Oval Office in 1961 to many Americans. The administration of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, a ruling Liberal Democratic Party member who swept into power Thursday promising reform, faces lots of problems and has little time.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new economic team appointed Thursday by incoming Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi sends a strong message through its inclusion of outsiders that reform will be more than a campaign pledge. Somewhat less heartening, however, is the lack of hard-nosed experience needed to bring about Koizumi's rather vaguely outlined reforms and tackle Japan's deep-seated problems, economists and market watchers say.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While studying at the London School of Economics in 1969, Junichiro Koizumi received a telegram that his lawmaker father had died of lung cancer. Returning to Tokyo, he found a simple handwritten message from his dad: "Junichiro Koizumi, be victorious." Koizumi was elected today as prime minister of Japan. With his ascendancy, the dark horse 59-year-old reformer will far exceed his father's expectations--and those of most Japanese as recently as a week ago.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
In the first test of his willingness to shake up Japan's hidebound governing party, premier-in-waiting Junichiro Koizumi today firmed up the lineup for a trio of top party posts, including among them a longtime ally and a recent rival. Koizumi is to be voted in as prime minister Thursday by parliament after winning the presidency of the Liberal Democratic Party, or LDP, on Tuesday.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quixotic reformer Junichiro Koizumi is virtually certain to become Japan's next prime minister after a groundswell of grass-roots support over the weekend ensured his election today as ruling-party president. Normally obedient rank-and-file members of the Liberal Democratic Party, which has ruled Japan for most of the last five decades, defied power brokers and slammed home the message that without a new way of doing things, the LDP can't survive.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, one of Japan's most unpopular post-World War II leaders, told his Cabinet today that he will resign, but he set no date, the government's top spokesman said. Though Mori has long been expected to quit, this was the first time he said he would directly and publicly. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party is planning an election this month to choose a successor. The apparent top-runner to replace Mori is former Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ichiro Ozawa, the strategist of a rebellion that is threatening to deprive Japan's Liberal Democratic Party of its 38-year grasp on power, confesses that he isn't sure who Japan's next prime minister may be. But the 51-year-old rebel insists that the ruling party split he instigated--stripping it of a majority in the powerful lower house of Parliament--is the beginning of a long-term revolution he intends to carry out.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is a brilliant policy strategist and ace at brute-power politics who criticizes Japan's consensus decision-making as "collective irresponsibility." He says Japan must become a "normal nation" by ending its free ride on American security policies and by more actively cooperating with such global ventures as U.N. peacekeeping operations. For such views, Ichiro Ozawa of the Renewal Party is praised as a visionary and condemned as a dangerous autocrat.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Japanese bureaucrats are known for their conservative dress, measured opinions and proper decorum. But Katsutoshi Matsuo apparently had a much flashier side not appreciated by his Foreign Ministry colleagues. In his free time, the 55-year-old diplomat allegedly spent millions of dollars on racehorses, lovers, ex-wives and a tony condominium using money embezzled from a secret government expense fund, according to Japanese media reports and a government report released Thursday.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economists say Japan's chances of avoiding its second recession in 18 months are getting dicier by the day, and were worsened over the weekend by another political scandal that promises to slow action on measures to keep the lackluster economy struggling along. "I think there's a growing possibility the Japanese economy will see a hard landing," said Yi Chang, analyst with Sumitomo Marine Asset Management. "Economic policy is in a political checkmate."
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