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Japan Population

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NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What happens to a prosperous, peaceful society whose women decide en masse they have better things to do than have babies? Nobody knows. It's never happened. But Japan is about to find out. This nation's young women are now offered an unprecedented array of personal and professional freedoms, but the joys of children and family life are still bound by traditional constraints. The result of millions of women's individual decisions is a collective baby strike.
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NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mae Whitman and Alia Shawkat just had the grooviest time playing two friends growing up in 1965 in the new Fox Family Channel series "State of Grace," which premieres Monday on the cable network. For 13-year-old Whitman and 12-year-old Shawkat, one of the coolest things about turning the clock back to the swinging '60s was the vintage-style candy they got to eat, such as candy cigarettes. "Mae and I loved them," enthuses Shawkat, who was seen in "Three Kings." "It was so much fun," echoes Whitman, seen in "One Fine Day" and "Hope Floats."
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NEWS
December 3, 1991
In the last full year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Asian nation was clearly an economic David to the U.S. Goliath. It had about half the U.S. population, but its economy as measured by its Gross National Product was less than one-tenth as large as America's. On a per capita basis, the U.S. economy was six times larger than Japan's. But by last year, Japan's economy was half the size of America's--and only slightly behind on a per capita basis.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What happens to a prosperous, peaceful society whose women decide en masse they have better things to do than have babies? Nobody knows. It's never happened. But Japan is about to find out. This nation's young women are now offered an unprecedented array of personal and professional freedoms, but the joys of children and family life are still bound by traditional constraints. The result of millions of women's individual decisions is a collective baby strike.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This land of overproduction, overtime and even death by overwork may be the best place in the world to make microchips. But it is arguably one of the worst places to make babies. Even as Japan's trade surplus hits the roof, its birthrate is sinking into the cellar. Suddenly Japan Inc. must grapple with a demographic dilemma that could force a radical change in the daily grind of life here--how to make this society livable enough so that citizens will want to raise children.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mae Whitman and Alia Shawkat just had the grooviest time playing two friends growing up in 1965 in the new Fox Family Channel series "State of Grace," which premieres Monday on the cable network. For 13-year-old Whitman and 12-year-old Shawkat, one of the coolest things about turning the clock back to the swinging '60s was the vintage-style candy they got to eat, such as candy cigarettes. "Mae and I loved them," enthuses Shawkat, who was seen in "Three Kings." "It was so much fun," echoes Whitman, seen in "One Fine Day" and "Hope Floats."
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | JIM MANN
If you want to figure out what's happening in Japan and South Korea these days, it helps to look at underlying population trends. Nicholas Eberstadt, a Harvard University demographer, collects them. He delves through birth and death statistics for clues to the future. These numbers provide some perspective on today's news. Over the past few weeks, for example, Japan has been refusing to give rice to help relieve the famine in North Korea.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
From the two-room apartment she shares with three other elderly women at the Itabashi Lodging Home, Shima Kobayashi has the leisure to contemplate the changes that she has witnessed in Japanese life during her 86 years. One room holds four identical beds for the residents of this publicly financed apartment.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yasuhiro Akimoto, a 27-year computer salesman in Tokyo, makes no bones about the kind of woman he wants to marry: a gentle spirit who will have a hot dinner waiting for him when he gets home, properly greet him at the door and arrange his shoes after he takes them off. Noriko Suzuki, a 27-year-old editor at a major publishing firm, is equally clear about her ideal mate: a supportive man who will encourage her career and allow her to pursue her own interests.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | NAO NAKANISHI, Reuters
After decades of debate, the Japanese government is finally gearing up to legalize the Pill, but many women are worried it will further erode their position in Japan's chauvinistic society. The Health and Welfare Ministry announced last year that it would lift the ban on oral contraceptive pills by the end of the 1980s. But only 35% of married women welcome the move, according to a newspaper survey, and only 13% were willing to use it because of worries about side effects.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | JIM MANN
If you want to figure out what's happening in Japan and South Korea these days, it helps to look at underlying population trends. Nicholas Eberstadt, a Harvard University demographer, collects them. He delves through birth and death statistics for clues to the future. These numbers provide some perspective on today's news. Over the past few weeks, for example, Japan has been refusing to give rice to help relieve the famine in North Korea.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This land of overproduction, overtime and even death by overwork may be the best place in the world to make microchips. But it is arguably one of the worst places to make babies. Even as Japan's trade surplus hits the roof, its birthrate is sinking into the cellar. Suddenly Japan Inc. must grapple with a demographic dilemma that could force a radical change in the daily grind of life here--how to make this society livable enough so that citizens will want to raise children.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yasuhiro Akimoto, a 27-year computer salesman in Tokyo, makes no bones about the kind of woman he wants to marry: a gentle spirit who will have a hot dinner waiting for him when he gets home, properly greet him at the door and arrange his shoes after he takes them off. Noriko Suzuki, a 27-year-old editor at a major publishing firm, is equally clear about her ideal mate: a supportive man who will encourage her career and allow her to pursue her own interests.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
In the last full year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the Asian nation was clearly an economic David to the U.S. Goliath. It had about half the U.S. population, but its economy as measured by its Gross National Product was less than one-tenth as large as America's. On a per capita basis, the U.S. economy was six times larger than Japan's. But by last year, Japan's economy was half the size of America's--and only slightly behind on a per capita basis.
NEWS
January 30, 1988 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
From the two-room apartment she shares with three other elderly women at the Itabashi Lodging Home, Shima Kobayashi has the leisure to contemplate the changes that she has witnessed in Japanese life during her 86 years. One room holds four identical beds for the residents of this publicly financed apartment.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | NAO NAKANISHI, Reuters
After decades of debate, the Japanese government is finally gearing up to legalize the Pill, but many women are worried it will further erode their position in Japan's chauvinistic society. The Health and Welfare Ministry announced last year that it would lift the ban on oral contraceptive pills by the end of the 1980s. But only 35% of married women welcome the move, according to a newspaper survey, and only 13% were willing to use it because of worries about side effects.
WORLD
December 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan's population dropped this year for the first time on record, the government said, signaling a demographic turnaround for one of the world's fastest-aging societies. The Health Ministry's annual survey showed deaths outnumbered births by 10,000 -- the first time that had happened since data were first compiled in 1899, a ministry official said. The announcement marked an acceleration of earlier projections that forecast a decline in Japan's population of 127.7 million as early as 2006.
HOME & GARDEN
December 20, 2007 | Susan Essoyan, Special to The Times
ASKED why he wants to move an old Japanese farmhouse across the globe, Harrelson Stanley had a simple answer. "I have to do it," said the 44-year-old woodworker, his fingertips poking through worn gloves after weeks of pounding and pulling the house apart. "It's what I'm meant to do." Larry Ellison, chief executive of Oracle Corp., built a Japanese-style estate in Silicon Valley, complete with a teahouse he imported from Japan. But Stanley is no high-flying billionaire.
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