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BUSINESS
April 3, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
After more than 30 years of slugging away on the fringes of Japan's construction market, PAE International still had trouble hiring local subcontractors, so strong was the taboo against collaborating with foreigners. When a PAE executive complained about the dilemma in an interview televised here last year, however, he was quickly surprised by telephone calls from several sympathetic Japanese subcontractors. It seemed that a major shift in attitude was afoot. They were actually asking for work.
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NEWS
June 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another triumph for direct democracy in a country that tends to be ruled from the top down, Japanese voters Sunday rejected plans for an industrial waste plant in the central town of Mitake and signaled demands for a better balance between economic growth and environmental protection. Underscoring the interest in the issue, 87.5% of Mitake voters turned out for the poll and overwhelmingly rejected the plant by a vote of 10,373 to 2,442.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu late Wednesday approved a compromise on a key issue blocking agreement in U.S.-Japan trade negotiations and telephoned President Bush to seek his acceptance of the new proposal. But, as negotiators recessed at 5:50 a.m. today after a marathon 21 hours of talks, a Foreign Ministry official said, "Not all of the big issues have been resolved."
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of years, the Isahaya wetlands in southern Japan teemed with exotic birds, rare fish and a rich, delicate ecosystem that sustained more than 500 species of sea life, some of them endangered. Today, however, the parched and cracked seabed stinks with the smell of death.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 1-yen coin, a slice of aluminum 3/4 of an inch wide and so light that it floats on a postage scale, has gotten the Gargantuan computer company Fujitsu Ltd. into an embarrassing predicament and threatens to become the latest flash point of U.S.-Japan economic friction. Fujitsu's president, Takuma Yamamoto, swallowed his pride on Wednesday and called a news conference to apologize for his company's ethically dubious bidding on public works projects.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
In an attempt to defuse an increasingly volatile trade issue, U.S. and Japanese officials Tuesday announced a plan that would allow American builders to bid for billions of dollars of construction work in Japan, including airports, roads, bridges and buildings. The accord came after two years of on-and-off negotiations, prompted by growing White House protests that Japan was unfairly blocking U.S.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Public Works Spending Up 10% in November: The Ministry of Construction said expenditures that month totaled $12.7 billion, an increase of 10.1% from the same period of 1992, Nikkei English News reported. November's double-digit increase followed a 15.2% rise in October, it said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Drops Threat Against Japan: The government withdrew the threat of trade sanctions after the two countries reached agreement on plans to open Japan's lucrative government construction market to foreign firms. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said that after reviewing a plan by Japan's Cabinet to open up the bidding process for major public works projects, the Clinton Administration decided to withdraw the threatened sanctions. The deadline for reaching agreement was today.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Audit Faults Bidding System: Results of a Japanese government audit found fault with its bidding system in public works, lending credence to U.S. arguments that Japan's construction market is closed to foreign competition. The report by the government's Management and Coordination Agency said 20 out of 35 government ministries and public corporations had not adopted a fair open-bidding system.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | ART PINE and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration moved Wednesday to step up pressure on Japan to end what it considers backsliding on key promises that Japan made last April in a high-level accord designed to ease trade tensions between the two countries. U.S. officials said Secretary of State James A. Baker III plans to warn Japan of the growing U.S. frustration--and to demand prompt action by the Tokyo government--during a meeting Friday with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing fresh evidence of how some Japanese markets are kept closed, Japan's Fair Trade Commission on Monday accused nine electrical machinery makers of illegal bid rigging. Among the firms accused of anti-competitive practices are some of Japan's most famous electronics firms, including Hitachi Ltd., Toshiba Corp. and Mitsubishi Electric Corp.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Public Works Spending Up 10% in November: The Ministry of Construction said expenditures that month totaled $12.7 billion, an increase of 10.1% from the same period of 1992, Nikkei English News reported. November's double-digit increase followed a 15.2% rise in October, it said.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Drops Threat Against Japan: The government withdrew the threat of trade sanctions after the two countries reached agreement on plans to open Japan's lucrative government construction market to foreign firms. U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said that after reviewing a plan by Japan's Cabinet to open up the bidding process for major public works projects, the Clinton Administration decided to withdraw the threatened sanctions. The deadline for reaching agreement was today.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to domestic construction scandals and the threat of U.S. trade sanctions, Japan on Tuesday approved a plan to open major public works projects to foreign contractors. But the practical impact of the program was unclear because some key details were not spelled out, and U.S. officials reserved comment until they could study it further.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Audit Faults Bidding System: Results of a Japanese government audit found fault with its bidding system in public works, lending credence to U.S. arguments that Japan's construction market is closed to foreign competition. The report by the government's Management and Coordination Agency said 20 out of 35 government ministries and public corporations had not adopted a fair open-bidding system.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Contractor Faces Bribery Charge: Teruzo Yoshino, chairman of Japan's largest construction firm, Shimizu Corp., was arrested on charges of offering a $96,000 bribe to Fujio Takeuchi, former governor of Japan's Ibaraki prefecture, in exchange for public works projects, Japanese news services reported. Yoshino, 75, denied the allegations. The arrest is part of a wider probe of alleged bribes from major Japanese construction firms.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. negotiators said Monday that a Japanese proposal to spend the equivalent of $2.7 trillion on public works over the next 10 years is not sufficient to reduce Japan's trade surplus. But the negotiators, trying to conclude a yearlong series of trade talks, softened an accusation by U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills that the Japanese are dragging their feet on trade matters.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu said Friday that he would not give in to a key U.S. trade demand that Japan specify targets for boosting its public works spending, a hoped-for wedge in opening the market here to more foreign business. Kaifu's tough stand, coming a day after a stunning trade breakthrough in which Japan accepted U.S. technology as a cellular-phone standard, suggests that the government intends to assert itself despite heavy pressure for economic reform.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of wrangling over political scandals, the Japanese Parliament on Thursday passed a crucial spending bill, part of an $86-billion package to jolt the economy out of its doldrums. Lawmakers, scrambling until nearly midnight on the last day of this year's special parliamentary session, also approved a partial package of political reform bills aimed at rectifying the unequal weight of rural and urban votes.
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