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Japan Public Works

BUSINESS
March 7, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing fresh evidence of how some Japanese markets are kept closed, Japan's Fair Trade Commission on Monday accused nine electrical machinery makers of illegal bid rigging. Among the firms accused of anti-competitive practices are some of Japan's most famous electronics firms, including Hitachi Ltd., Toshiba Corp. and Mitsubishi Electric Corp.
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NEWS
December 11, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of wrangling over political scandals, the Japanese Parliament on Thursday passed a crucial spending bill, part of an $86-billion package to jolt the economy out of its doldrums. Lawmakers, scrambling until nearly midnight on the last day of this year's special parliamentary session, also approved a partial package of political reform bills aimed at rectifying the unequal weight of rural and urban votes.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of years, the Isahaya wetlands in southern Japan teemed with exotic birds, rare fish and a rich, delicate ecosystem that sustained more than 500 species of sea life, some of them endangered. Today, however, the parched and cracked seabed stinks with the smell of death.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government Friday issued a sharp rebuke against U.S. Trade Representative Carla A. Hills, denouncing a report she submitted to Congress earlier in the week that criticized dango , or collusive bidding, in Japan's arcane construction industry. Ironically, Hills' report was widely seen in the United States as conciliatory because she did not recommend retaliatory sanctions after her agency investigated allegations of unfair trade practices in the Japanese public works market.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Deep in the range of small mountains north of Kyoto is a small Buddhist temple where for the past 11 centuries monks have been praying to assuage the capricious spirit of the Kamo River, protecting the ancient capital in the basin below from floods. The modern successor to that tradition has taken on a new duty: fighting a flood control project he believes will devastate these wooded hills and fill the river with silt.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A group of Japanese construction firms has agreed to pay the U.S. government $32.6 million to settle a dispute over alleged bid-rigging of projects at an American military base near Tokyo, U.S. officials said Thursday. The U.S. side had threatened lawsuits both in Japan and the United States unless a settlement was reached. Representatives from seven Japanese construction firms and American officials signed the memorandum of intent on behalf of 99 Japanese firms, the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The Reagan Administration made hard-fought, limited progress last week during the visit of Japanese Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita toward getting Japan to lower artificial barriers to competition for its construction projects. It's a high-stakes battle because Japan plans to build $60 billion worth of airports, bridges, roads and other public works within the next decade. And it's only fair that U.S.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to domestic construction scandals and the threat of U.S. trade sanctions, Japan on Tuesday approved a plan to open major public works projects to foreign contractors. But the practical impact of the program was unclear because some key details were not spelled out, and U.S. officials reserved comment until they could study it further.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The promised opening of Japan's construction industry to greater participation by foreign firms will be put to the test in the massive effort that will be needed to rebuild earthquake-devastated areas of the country. Untold billions of dollars worth of repairs will be needed on damaged expressways, bridges and train lines as well as on thousands of buildings in or near Kobe, Japan's sixth-largest city, which was struck by a severe earthquake early Tuesday.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Talks between Japan and the United States on structural trade reforms progressed today with a last-minute breakthrough on the issue of increasing Japan's public works spending, officials said. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu conveyed Japan's final offer on the issue to President Bush in a telephone conversation. Bush said he will hear details of the talks from U.S. officials and expressed appreciation for Kaifu's efforts, according to a high-ranking Foreign Ministry official.
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