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NEWS
February 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer and
Emperor Hirohito, a man once despised by much of the world as the symbol of ruthless Japanese military aggression, was honored by the international community today as kings, presidents and other representatives of 163 countries attended his elaborate state funeral.
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NEWS
December 7, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She will be known as Princess Aiko. The newest baby in Japan's imperial family was anointed today, the seventh day of her life, with the very traditional Japanese name, which essentially means "child of love." The name was said to have been selected by her parents, Crown Prince Naruhito and Princess Masako, from several candidates recommended by three scholars. But the final choice needed to be approved by the emperor, as is royal tradition.
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NEWS
April 13, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Crown Prince Naruhito formalized his engagement to former diplomat Masako Owada on Monday, sending gifts of fish, silk and sake to the family of the future empress in a brief traditional ceremony that was televised live. The couple have been officially engaged since Jan. 19, when the Imperial Council, headed by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, approved their betrothal.
NEWS
November 17, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the wedding day of Crown Prince Naruhito and Princess Masako in June 1993, a trained monkey named Tsurusuke peered into a crystal ball before a television audience of millions and predicted that the couple would bear three children, the first a girl. After an eight-year wait, a highly publicized miscarriage, endless speculation and a lot of hand-wringing, the nation is eagerly awaiting the royal couple's first child, expected any day now.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of violent protest by clandestine radicals opposing Japan's imperial system, Emperor Akihito declared to the world today his accession to the ancient Chrysanthemum Throne. Royalty, heads of state and special envoys from 158 nations assembled under strict rules of protocol at the Imperial Palace in central Tokyo to attend the stiff, 30-minute enthronement rite--the first such ceremony in 62 years.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Until Emperor Hirohito's death, a taboo prohibited any discussion here of his role in World War II and his responsibility for it. Shinto rites that the emperor carried out as chief priest of the once-militaristic religion stirred little controversy, despite a clause in Japan's postwar constitution that mandates separation of religion and politics. His public appearances and occasional news conferences attracted minimal coverage in the media.
NEWS
February 24, 1989
The Sojoden-no Gi and Taiso-no Rei, as the religious and secular rites in Emperor Hirohito's funeral ceremony are called, were held at downtown park, Shinjuku Gyoen, which was originally an imperial garden. His entombment took place at the Musashi Imperial Cemetery on the outskirts of the capital. (Times listed are for Tokyo). Friday, 7:30 a.m.-- Renso-Tojitsu Hinkyusai-no Gi, final ceremony at the hinkyu, or "Imperial Place of Rest," held at palace. 9:00 a.m.
NEWS
January 10, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Choosing international protocol over domestic politics, Britain announced Monday that Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and Foreign Minister Geoffrey Howe will represent it in Tokyo next month for the state funeral of Emperor Hirohito.
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Doctors gave Emperor Hirohito a blood transfusion when his blood pressure fell Tuesday, the 100th day the 87-year-old Japanese monarch has been bedridden since suffering severe internal bleeding, palace officials said. Officials said Hirohito discharged a small amount of blood, but his condition was stable by late Tuesday. Doctors gave Hirohito 0.85 pints of blood when his systolic blood pressure dropped below 100 and his temperature rose, Imperial Household Agency spokesman Kenji Maeda said.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Not everybody in Japan loves the emperor. As the 87-year-old sovereign Hirohito lies gravely ill in his palace, a tiny band of citizens flirts with lese majesty, marching around a park carrying signs denouncing the imperial system. Small groups of intellectuals conduct seminars to discuss his responsibility in World War II.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | Associated Press
Empress Dowager Nagako, who lived through Japan's devastating defeat in World War II and its rise as an economic superpower, was laid to rest Tuesday in a mausoleum beside her husband, Emperor Hirohito. More than 1,000 ambassadors, politicians and other dignitaries attended the funeral. The empress dowager died at 97 on June 16 after falling into a coma at home in Tokyo's Imperial Palace. Citizens lined up to pay respects at her coffin on a cedar pavilion near Tokyo's Gokokuji Temple.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | From Associated Press
Japanese palace officials announced today that Crown Princess Masako had been pregnant but suffered a miscarriage. The unofficial leaks earlier this month that Masako, 36, may have been pregnant after six years of marriage to the emperor's son, Crown Prince Naruhito, 39, had set off a media frenzy here. "Pregnancy of happiness," the Shukan Asahi weekly magazine announced when the news broke. The emperor is only a symbol of the nation, with no political powers since the end of World War II.
NEWS
December 11, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Honorable Pregnancy," screamed the giant headlines on a tabloid here Friday as Japanese rejoiced over reports that Crown Princess Masako, after more than six years of marriage, might at last be pregnant with an heir to the 2,600-year-old Chrysanthemum Throne. The news came as a triumphant scoop for Asahi Shimbun. The newspaper reported in Friday morning editions that the former Masako Owada, a Harvard-educated diplomat, was showing signs of pregnancy.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | Reuters
Empress Michiko has partially recovered the power of speech, seven weeks after being struck with a mystery ailment, the Japanese imperial palace said today. According to a Kyodo news agency report, palace officials said Michiko broke her silence last Tuesday, whispering "Heika" (Your Majesty) to Emperor Akihito. After Michiko's collapse in October, she regained consciousness within hours and, apart from being speechless, appeared to have suffered no lasting ill effects.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's Empress Michiko, under stress from a barrage of negative articles and a hectic year that included the wedding of her eldest son, collapsed Wednesday on her 59th birthday, the Imperial Palace's chief court physician reported. She was not hospitalized and regained consciousness a few hours later but had not regained her speech. The sudden collapse of Japan's royal matron occurred at 10:25 a.m.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masako Owada, the former hard-driving, American-educated career diplomat, began the first day of a new life Wednesday as Japan's Crown Princess Masako in a sparkling tiara and glittering gown, while an enraptured nation set off fireworks, composed love songs and showered congratulations on her marriage to Crown Prince Naruhito.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Japanese Cabinet today formally transferred the official duties of the ailing Emperor Hirohito to his son, Crown Prince Akihito, a government spokesman said. Chief government spokesman Keizo Obuchi told reporters this morning that the 87-year-old emperor health's was unchanged from Wednesday. At that time, Hirohito's chief doctor said the monarch's condition "clearly stabilized" after an intestinal hemorrhage caused the emperor to vomit blood.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1989
We see in The Times that Uncle Sam is planning to close a few U.S. military bases to save a few million dollars each year. Why don't we close a few of our bases in foreign lands and save a few billion dollars? Who are we protecting these people from? Why are U.S. citizens paying the tab to "protect" other countries' citizens from whomever it is they need protecting from? Has anybody ever told us how many trillion dollars we have spent to provide this service?
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a sip of sacred sake and a bow to Japan's sun goddess, Crown Prince Naruhito and former diplomat Masako Owada were wed today, ushering in the next generation of the world's oldest hereditary monarchy. Clad in ancient court costumes--Naruhito in flaming orange silk and Owada in a long hairpiece and multihued 12-layer ceremonial kimono--the pair knelt before Amaterasu, Japan's mythical matriarch, in the Imperial Sanctuary on the palace grounds.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In silent procession, the royal couple will enter a sanctuary on the Imperial Palace grounds housing Amaterasu, the sacred sun goddess of Japan and mythical matriarch of the 2,600-year-old Royal Family. There, in a dimly lit chamber, witnessed by only one attendant, the Chief Ritualist, the Crown Prince of Japan will read a matrimonial pledge. "I have come before you with the Crown Princess to pledge we will vow unchanging love," he will say, adding a plea for protection.
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