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NEWS
April 17, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, skirting the contentious trade issues that have divided their two countries for years, today declared the U.S.-Japan security relationship to be the "cornerstone" of peace and prosperity in Asia. Following a yearlong review of the U.S. military presence in Japan and the rest of northeast Asia, Clinton asserted that the United States will retain its current level of 100,000 troops in the region, including about 47,000 in Japan.
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SPORTS
August 9, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
LONDON — When the clock finally ran out after the U.S. women's soccer team's gold-medal win over Japan on Thursday, a group of players ran from the sideline to goalkeeper Hope Solo while another dashed toward the other end of the field to dog-pile atop Carli Lloyd. How appropriate. Because in a game that was so much about retribution and redemption, few players felt as if they had more to prove than Solo and Lloyd. In the Olympic semifinals, Solo had given up three goals to Canada's Christine Sinclair, the most the U.S. has allowed in a game Solo has played in in more than four years.
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NEWS
September 24, 1989
Vice President Dan Quayle, who toured two northern Japan military bases on the third day of his Far East visit, said that the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty must not be touched. "Anybody who thinks you ought to tamper, rewrite or modify the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty is wrong," Quayle told reporters during a flight to Chitose and Misawa, the two main air bases guarding northern Japan. Japan's opposition Socialist Party has called for scaling back U.S.-Japan military ties.
SPORTS
March 23, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
They call it the World Baseball Classic. But don't let the name fool you. Because although the tournament began nearly three weeks ago with 16 teams from six continents playing in four countries, it will end tonight at Dodger Stadium almost as it began -- with Japan playing South Korea.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan's largest newspaper, broke another post-World War II taboo today by urging the Japanese people to support its proposal that the prime minister be given emergency powers to deal with foreign military threats, disasters and terrorism. The 10-million-circulation newspaper suggested that new measures be passed to let the prime minister declare a state of emergency, issue orders on authority of only his Cabinet and dispatch troops to an emergency--at home or overseas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996
In reaffirming the U.S.-Japan security relationship, President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto agreed to some changes that could broaden Japan's role in maintaining stability in the Asia-Pacific region. But is Japan ready to take on the sensitive issue of a truly expanded role in regional defense? That unsettled question will weigh heavily on its neighbors, who suffered greatly under the Japanese military in World War II.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first televised debate in 30 years among leaders of Japan's major political parties, Socialist Party Chairwoman Takako Doi declared Friday that her organization welcomes proposals by some Americans to abolish the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty. The Socialists had been trying to remove an image of radicalism by softening their traditional advocacy of abrogation of the pact, and Doi had declared that a Socialist-led government would not abrogate the treaty unilaterally.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Tuesday revised its national defense policy for the first time in nearly two decades, calling for a high-tech, streamlined military force and reaffirming the security alliance with the United States. The new policy, approved by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and other Cabinet members of the Security Council of Japan after extensive political wrangling, also spells out new duties for the force.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan will "faithfully stand by" security arrangements with the United States, including continued support of troops in Okinawa and commitments to pay for U.S. bases and personnel, Foreign Minister Yohei Kono said Friday. "The presence of U.S. troops in Japan is still of great importance, and the U.S. presence is meaningful for this reason," Kono said in a wide-ranging interview with The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | FREDERICK DICKINSON, Frederick Dickinson is a national fellow of the Hoover Institution and an associate professor of Japanese history at the University of Pennsylvania
Washington would like the world to read its lips. "The best friend of Japan is the United States," Secretary of State Colin Powell told the visiting Japanese foreign minister recently. The same message will, no doubt, be conveyed to Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi when he meets President Bush at Camp David on Saturday. Newly appointed in April, Koizumi enjoys the highest ratings of any postwar Japanese prime minister (over 80%) and is a strong advocate of political and economic change.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
It began as a stock trader's nightmare, an error caused by a momentary lapse in concentration perhaps, or a clumsy bit of typing that led to a $331-million loss. It has since tarnished the reputation of the world's second-biggest stock exchange and exposed cracks in its electronic trading system. The president of the Tokyo Stock Exchange has said he may resign over the fiasco.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | B.J. REYES, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
For visitors who land on Midway, stepping off the plane 1,200 miles from the next town is like stepping back in time. Silence is broken only by the resident avian population--thousands upon thousands of gooney birds who greet arrivals with a wary stare and a peck on the feet if they wander too close. Pristine beaches appear untouched by humans, beckoning newcomers to a lagoon so clear it might as well be filled with bottled water.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese police Tuesday announced a sharp increase in anti-terrorism measures affecting 580 strategic sites nationwide, including embassies, central railway stations, nuclear power plants, airports and skyscrapers. The measures include a beefed-up police presence, manual and X-ray searches, ID and license checks and added questioning. Fishermen have even reported having their ice coolers examined at ports near potential terrorist targets. Security at the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2001 | FREDERICK DICKINSON, Frederick Dickinson is a national fellow of the Hoover Institution and an associate professor of Japanese history at the University of Pennsylvania
Washington would like the world to read its lips. "The best friend of Japan is the United States," Secretary of State Colin Powell told the visiting Japanese foreign minister recently. The same message will, no doubt, be conveyed to Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi when he meets President Bush at Camp David on Saturday. Newly appointed in April, Koizumi enjoys the highest ratings of any postwar Japanese prime minister (over 80%) and is a strong advocate of political and economic change.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Midway through a genteel, abstract discussion about America and Asia here last month, a Japanese businessman suddenly launched into a tirade about the difficulties his company was having in China. The Chinese make promises and don't keep them, he fumed. They sign contracts and then try to change the terms. I started to tune out. Over the years, I've heard a zillion similar complaints. Doing business in China is legendarily frustrating. Nothing new about that.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking in the wake of President Clinton's dramatic visit to China, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright reassured leaders of a nervous Japan on Saturday that their nation remains the "cornerstone" of Washington's links with Asia. The U.S-Japanese relationship "is the foundation for stability in the Asia Pacific. It is the cornerstone of our strategic policy in Asia," Albright told reporters after a morning of meetings with Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto and Foreign Minister Keizo Obuchi.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Midway through a genteel, abstract discussion about America and Asia here last month, a Japanese businessman suddenly launched into a tirade about the difficulties his company was having in China. The Chinese make promises and don't keep them, he fumed. They sign contracts and then try to change the terms. I started to tune out. Over the years, I've heard a zillion similar complaints. Doing business in China is legendarily frustrating. Nothing new about that.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In by far the most aggressive move by a foreign firm to exploit the newly opened Japanese financial markets, giant U.S. brokerage Merrill Lynch & Co. revealed a major bid Thursday to capture some of the $10 trillion held by Japan's individual investors. Merrill Lynch unveiled plans to hire about 2,000 employees from recently bankrupted Yamaichi Securities Co. and open 31 local offices across Japan.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan joined the club of wary world powers this week after the capture by Peruvian guerrillas of hundreds of guests at a birthday party in Lima for Emperor Akihito demonstrated the frightening global ramifications of foreign policy lapses. "Like America, Japan has made enemies without even noticing, and now it must protect itself," said professor Koichi Oizumi, an international relations expert at Japan University. "We must take an 'eye-for-eye, tooth-for-tooth' attitude toward terrorism.
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