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Japan Suits

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NEWS
September 19, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen Asian women, forced into sex slavery by the Japanese army during World War II, sued the government of Japan Monday, seeking unspecified but substantial damages for years of rape, beating, starvation and other forms of mistreatment that continue to haunt them into old age. Lawyers in the case said that it is the first suit filed in U.S. courts directly against the Japanese government for war crimes.
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NEWS
March 9, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For centuries, Japan's harmonious methods for settling disputes helped shape the nation's cultural identity. And as recently as the 1980s, the country credited its relative paucity of lawyers as one reason Japan Inc. was drubbing the rest of the world. Of course, Japan today, with its struggling economy, is no longer so fearsome.
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BUSINESS
May 30, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese court has frozen the bank accounts and property of a Japanese company accused of participating in a scheme to rig construction bids for a U.S. Navy base in Japan. U.S. Justice Department lawyers asked for the order freezing $1.6 million worth of the assets of Hosaka Engineering Co. It was the latest action in a civil suit that the Justice Department initiated last December against 140 Japanese companies--the first time that the U.S.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen Asian women, forced into sex slavery by the Japanese army during World War II, sued the government of Japan Monday, seeking unspecified but substantial damages for years of rape, beating, starvation and other forms of mistreatment that continue to haunt them into old age. Lawyers in the case said that it is the first suit filed in U.S. courts directly against the Japanese government for war crimes.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Sues Japanese Construction Firms: It accused the group of companies of jacking up prices on construction projects at a U.S. naval base through bid rigging. The lawsuit, filed in Tokyo District Court, seeks $5.4 million in damages. The court said the suit targets 53 construction companies that bid on a total of 77 projects at the Atsugi Naval Air Facility near Tokyo between 1983 and 1990.
NEWS
March 17, 1993 | Reuters
Japan's Supreme Court upheld government censorship of schoolbooks Tuesday, rejecting a landmark lawsuit by a textbook crusader who has waged a 30-year battle against whitewashing of wartime history. The Supreme Court backed a Tokyo High Court decision seven years ago that defended the Education Ministry's constitutional right to dictate the contents of schoolbooks.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From the Washington Post
A U.S. citizen serving a prison term in Japan is suing the Japanese government for alleged human rights violations that are substantially similar to allegations made last year by a New York-based human rights group. Kevin Neal Mara, serving a 4 1/2-year sentence for importing more than 20 pounds of marijuana, alleges prison officials have placed him in leather restraints and in solitary confinement for days at a time for minor violations. Mara, 32, of Fairfield, Conn.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, an admitted heavy smoker, was sued Friday by five anti-smokers who said his habit violated the country's constitution guaranteeing a wholesome life. The lawsuit quoted the premier as saying, "Taxes on cigarettes are big revenue sources for the central and local governments. I will smoke as much as possible, while watching my health, and avoid imposing a burden on the medical insurance system budget."
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For centuries, Japan's harmonious methods for settling disputes helped shape the nation's cultural identity. And as recently as the 1980s, the country credited its relative paucity of lawyers as one reason Japan Inc. was drubbing the rest of the world. Of course, Japan today, with its struggling economy, is no longer so fearsome.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Japanese father finally gave up fighting authorities for the right to name his 7-month-old son Akuma, or "Devil." Shigeharu Sato, 30, withdrew his appeal against officials who had refused to enter the name in Sato's family register, an official document required of all Japanese, said a family court spokesman. Authorities argued that the name would not conform to social norms.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eastman Kodak Co. and U.S. trade policy suffered a major blow Friday when the World Trade Organization rejected the U.S. charge that Japanese bureaucrats and business leaders conspired to keep foreign photo film companies out of their market. Friday's preliminary ruling represents the first time the U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, an admitted heavy smoker, was sued Friday by five anti-smokers who said his habit violated the country's constitution guaranteeing a wholesome life. The lawsuit quoted the premier as saying, "Taxes on cigarettes are big revenue sources for the central and local governments. I will smoke as much as possible, while watching my health, and avoid imposing a burden on the medical insurance system budget."
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | From the Washington Post
A U.S. citizen serving a prison term in Japan is suing the Japanese government for alleged human rights violations that are substantially similar to allegations made last year by a New York-based human rights group. Kevin Neal Mara, serving a 4 1/2-year sentence for importing more than 20 pounds of marijuana, alleges prison officials have placed him in leather restraints and in solitary confinement for days at a time for minor violations. Mara, 32, of Fairfield, Conn.
NEWS
March 21, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
All but one of 456 Japanese hemophiliacs who sued after being infected with the AIDS virus decided to accept a settlement in their legal battle against the government and five firms over the spread of HIV-tainted blood products. The government and pharmaceutical firms had already agreed to the out-of-court settlement, which recommended a onetime payment of $420,000 to each claimant or his or her family, along with continuing monthly payments.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic show of contrition from a Cabinet official, Japan's health minister tearfully apologized Friday to AIDS sufferers for allowing contaminated blood products to be administered to the nation's hemophiliacs. "The Health and Welfare Ministry and the government are responsible for everything. . . .
BUSINESS
September 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Sues Japanese Construction Firms: It accused the group of companies of jacking up prices on construction projects at a U.S. naval base through bid rigging. The lawsuit, filed in Tokyo District Court, seeks $5.4 million in damages. The court said the suit targets 53 construction companies that bid on a total of 77 projects at the Atsugi Naval Air Facility near Tokyo between 1983 and 1990.
NEWS
March 21, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
All but one of 456 Japanese hemophiliacs who sued after being infected with the AIDS virus decided to accept a settlement in their legal battle against the government and five firms over the spread of HIV-tainted blood products. The government and pharmaceutical firms had already agreed to the out-of-court settlement, which recommended a onetime payment of $420,000 to each claimant or his or her family, along with continuing monthly payments.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic show of contrition from a Cabinet official, Japan's health minister tearfully apologized Friday to AIDS sufferers for allowing contaminated blood products to be administered to the nation's hemophiliacs. "The Health and Welfare Ministry and the government are responsible for everything. . . .
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Japanese father finally gave up fighting authorities for the right to name his 7-month-old son Akuma, or "Devil." Shigeharu Sato, 30, withdrew his appeal against officials who had refused to enter the name in Sato's family register, an official document required of all Japanese, said a family court spokesman. Authorities argued that the name would not conform to social norms.
NEWS
March 17, 1993 | Reuters
Japan's Supreme Court upheld government censorship of schoolbooks Tuesday, rejecting a landmark lawsuit by a textbook crusader who has waged a 30-year battle against whitewashing of wartime history. The Supreme Court backed a Tokyo High Court decision seven years ago that defended the Education Ministry's constitutional right to dictate the contents of schoolbooks.
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