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Japan Territorial Waters

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November 12, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. naval vessel fired at least four dummy missiles that landed near a Japanese patrol boat at the mouth of heavily used Tokyo Bay, the Japanese government reported Friday. The missiles caused no damage or casualties. The commander of the U.S. Pacific forces, Adm. Huntington Hardisty, visited Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita and Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno separately early Friday to apologize for the incident. Takeshita replied that measures should be taken to prevent a recurrence.
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NEWS
November 12, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A U.S. naval vessel fired at least four dummy missiles that landed near a Japanese patrol boat at the mouth of heavily used Tokyo Bay, the Japanese government reported Friday. The missiles caused no damage or casualties. The commander of the U.S. Pacific forces, Adm. Huntington Hardisty, visited Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita and Foreign Minister Sosuke Uno separately early Friday to apologize for the incident. Takeshita replied that measures should be taken to prevent a recurrence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Japanese officials seized a South Korean boat Friday on charges of illegal eel fishing in Japanese waters off the city of Noshiro, about 312 miles northwest of Tokyo, the Maritime Safety Agency reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Japanese officials seized a South Korean boat Friday on charges of illegal eel fishing in Japanese waters off the city of Noshiro, about 312 miles northwest of Tokyo, the Maritime Safety Agency reported.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the great cliches commonly accepted in this country is that China is the rising power in Asia. You can hear this fashionable belief everywhere, whether in academic seminars, political debates or working-class bars. Yet within the depths of the Pentagon and the U.S. intelligence community, one hears a contrary argument, It goes like this: There are two rising powers in Asia. Two? You guessed it. China and Japan. Japan's attitude toward its military is quietly transforming.
WORLD
June 15, 2003 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
It's a twisted pile of junk that attracts as many as 12,000 visitors a day. And it just might change Japan's political landscape. Japanese are waiting patiently in the sun and rain for hours to gawk at the "Choryo 3705," a North Korean spy ship recently placed on display. It was salvaged from the East China Sea after a firefight with Japan's coast guard. "It was very shocking because we're such peaceful people," said Akira Okada, 70, an auditor.
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