Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Times
IN THE NEWS

Japan Times

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Americans buy news and views about Japan from a Japanese paper when the country already is the subject of extensive scrutiny in the U.S. press? The Japan Times is banking on the idea. The largest and oldest English-language daily in Japan is revamping its weekly overseas edition, beginning next month. Gone will be the old black-and-white format on extra-thin paper.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 9, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
The Japanese stem cell scientist who was accused of misconduct by her own research institution apologized Wednesday for making careless mistakes but insisted that her STAP stem cells are real. Haruko Obokata told reporters at a news conference that she “produced the STAP cells successfully more than 200 times, and this is the truth,” according to the Yomiuri Shimbun's Japan News . The cells -- known formally as stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency cells -- were described in a pair of studies published in January in the journal Nature.
Advertisement
FOOD
August 25, 2012 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice inoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water - as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami. Japanese supermarkets carry bottled salad dressings and sauces touting shio koji as an ingredient.
WORLD
December 26, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited a controversial shrine to World War II dead, including 14 convicted war criminals, ignoring U.S. advice against gestures bound to strain already tense relations with neighbors China and South Korea. Abe told Japanese news media the visit was intended "to report the progress of the first year of my administration and convey my resolve to build an era in which the people will never again suffer the ravages of war. " But the visit drew immediate rebuke from Beijing and Seoul, where officials fear Japan's nationalist leader is steering his country back to the militarism of the war years and those preceding it. China's Foreign Ministry summoned the Japanese ambassador in Beijing to formally protest Abe's visit to the Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo, the first by a sitting prime minister since 2006.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1987
Toshiaki Ogasawara has been elected to the international advisory board of Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles. Ogasawara is chairman and publisher of the Japan Times, Tokyo's largest English-language daily newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Sori Yanagi, whose designs for stools and kitchen pots brought the simplicity and purity of Japanese decor into the everyday, has died. He was 96. The pioneer of Japan's industrial design died Sunday of pneumonia in a Tokyo hospital, Koichi Fujita of Yanagi Design Office said. Yanagi's curvaceous "butterfly stool," evocative of a Japanese shrine gate, won an award at the Milan Triennale museum and design exhibition in 1957 and helped elevate him to international stature. The work — made of two pieces of molded plywood fixed together with a brass pin — later joined the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Louvre museum in Paris.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | United Press International
U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia may soon be able to listen to something more than the desert winds. Japan plans to send 40,000 Walkman-type cassette players to the troops as part of its aid to the multinational forces in the Persian Gulf, the Japan Times reported Monday.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Miyazawa to Offer U.S. Package of Joint Projects: Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa will propose a package of joint projects between Japan and the United States to promote bilateral cooperation when he visits Washington this week, the Japan Times reported. The package includes joint study of magnetically levitated transport technology for subway systems, proposals for an advanced telecommunications network in the Asia-Pacific region and high-level policy consultations on environmental issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matagoro Nakamura, 94, believed to be Japan's oldest kabuki actor, died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Tokyo, according to the Japan Times newspaper. Known for his ability to perform a wide range of supporting roles in the centuries-old traditional art, Nakamura's last main appearance on stage was in April 2006, according to the Mainichi newspaper. The son of a kabuki actor, Nakamura was born Yukio Nakamura in 1913. He debuted in Japan's classical theatrical art at age 8 and earned great acclaim for his graceful acting style that allowed him to look natural in a variety of roles ranging from a young woman to an elderly man. Since the 1970s, the Tokyo native had devoted himself to nurturing young kabuki actors and lecturing on the traditional art overseas.
WORLD
April 9, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Japan readied its missile defense systems Tuesday against a possible North Korean weapons test, saying it would shoot down any missiles or debris if Japanese territory was threatened. Patriot anti-missile batteries were deployed on the grounds of the Defense Ministry in Tokyo and at military installations in and around the capital, according to Japanese news reports. The PAC-3 batteries will also be based on the island of Okinawa, which hosts the bulk of U.S. troops in Japan, sooner than planned in response to North Korea's threats, the Asahi Shimbun reported . Deploying the anti-missile system in Tokyo is “part of our moves to establish a system to protect the lives of our citizens and ensure their safety,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said at a news conference, according to Jiji Press . Suga earlier said that the missiles will be used solely to protect Japan, according to the Japan Times . Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has pushed for Japan to reinterpret its constitution, which bans waging war, to allow Japan to intercept missiles fired at United States targets.
WORLD
April 5, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The U.S. and Japan unveiled plans Friday for gradually returning some land on Okinawa now used by the American military, but still intend to relocate a U.S. Marine base elsewhere on the island, an idea fervently opposed by Okinawans. The island hosts the bulk of U.S. military facilities in Japan, fueling longtime protests among residents who lament worsened noise, pollution and crime. Two sailors were imprisoned last month for allegedly raping an Okinawa woman, the latest incident to aggravate tensions on the island.
WORLD
February 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Japan hanged three convicted killers, its Justice Ministry said Thursday. The hangings are the first executions under the new government, continuing a secretive practice that has appalled human rights groups and made Japan an outlier among wealthy democracies. The three inmates were identified in Japanese media as Masahiro Kanagawa, convicted in a string of stabbings five years ago; Keiki Kano, sentenced for murdering a bar owner; and Kaoru Kobayashi, convicted of abducting and killing a 7-year-old girl.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This week, deputy Food editor Betty Hallock is all about shio koji : "The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. "They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice innoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water -- as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami.
FOOD
August 25, 2012 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice inoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water - as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami. Japanese supermarkets carry bottled salad dressings and sauces touting shio koji as an ingredient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Sori Yanagi, whose designs for stools and kitchen pots brought the simplicity and purity of Japanese decor into the everyday, has died. He was 96. The pioneer of Japan's industrial design died Sunday of pneumonia in a Tokyo hospital, Koichi Fujita of Yanagi Design Office said. Yanagi's curvaceous "butterfly stool," evocative of a Japanese shrine gate, won an award at the Milan Triennale museum and design exhibition in 1957 and helped elevate him to international stature. The work — made of two pieces of molded plywood fixed together with a brass pin — later joined the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Louvre museum in Paris.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
This week, deputy Food editor Betty Hallock is all about shio koji : "The latest trendy cooking ingredient in Japan is a fungus. And that fungus is spreading. Professional and home cooks in Japan are crazy for it, and it's flying off the shelves at Japanese markets in the U.S., too. "They're using shio koji -- a fermented mixture of koji (rice innoculated with the special -- and safe -- mold Aspergillus oryzae), shio (sea salt) and water -- as a seasoning in place of salt for its powers of umami.
SCIENCE
April 9, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
The Japanese stem cell scientist who was accused of misconduct by her own research institution apologized Wednesday for making careless mistakes but insisted that her STAP stem cells are real. Haruko Obokata told reporters at a news conference that she “produced the STAP cells successfully more than 200 times, and this is the truth,” according to the Yomiuri Shimbun's Japan News . The cells -- known formally as stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency cells -- were described in a pair of studies published in January in the journal Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matagoro Nakamura, 94, believed to be Japan's oldest kabuki actor, died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Tokyo, according to the Japan Times newspaper. Known for his ability to perform a wide range of supporting roles in the centuries-old traditional art, Nakamura's last main appearance on stage was in April 2006, according to the Mainichi newspaper. The son of a kabuki actor, Nakamura was born Yukio Nakamura in 1913. He debuted in Japan's classical theatrical art at age 8 and earned great acclaim for his graceful acting style that allowed him to look natural in a variety of roles ranging from a young woman to an elderly man. Since the 1970s, the Tokyo native had devoted himself to nurturing young kabuki actors and lecturing on the traditional art overseas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate's column runs on Wednesdays. The text of "A Nation Adrift" is on the Web page of the Asia Pacific Media Network: http://www.asiamedia.ucla.edu
Before too long, a major blowup will erupt between the United States and Japan. It has been too quiet on the Eastern front for too long. The last transpacific dustup occurred two years ago, at the height of the Asian financial flu.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|