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BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Americans buy news and views about Japan from a Japanese paper when the country already is the subject of extensive scrutiny in the U.S. press? The Japan Times is banking on the idea. The largest and oldest English-language daily in Japan is revamping its weekly overseas edition, beginning next month. Gone will be the old black-and-white format on extra-thin paper.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will Americans buy news and views about Japan from a Japanese paper when the country already is the subject of extensive scrutiny in the U.S. press? The Japan Times is banking on the idea. The largest and oldest English-language daily in Japan is revamping its weekly overseas edition, beginning next month. Gone will be the old black-and-white format on extra-thin paper.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matagoro Nakamura, 94, believed to be Japan's oldest kabuki actor, died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Tokyo, according to the Japan Times newspaper. Known for his ability to perform a wide range of supporting roles in the centuries-old traditional art, Nakamura's last main appearance on stage was in April 2006, according to the Mainichi newspaper. The son of a kabuki actor, Nakamura was born Yukio Nakamura in 1913. He debuted in Japan's classical theatrical art at age 8 and earned great acclaim for his graceful acting style that allowed him to look natural in a variety of roles ranging from a young woman to an elderly man. Since the 1970s, the Tokyo native had devoted himself to nurturing young kabuki actors and lecturing on the traditional art overseas.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2003 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
One of the larger urban redevelopments in the world, providing new options for Tokyo tourists, is set to open Friday. The $4-billion Roppongi Hills complex, which some liken to New York City's Rockefeller Center, includes a high-tech Hyatt hotel, a 54th-floor observation deck with 360-degree views of the city, an outdoor theater, scores of restaurants, more than 100 shops, a nine-screen movie theater and hundreds of apartments and offices. A major art museum will be added in the fall.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1988 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
While a student in the late 1940s at Tokyo University, Seiji Tsutsumi enraged his capitalist father by demonstrating on behalf of left-wing causes. He paid a hefty price. When father Yasujiro died in 1964, he left the bulk of his real estate and transportation empire to Seiji's reportedly illegitimate half-brother Yoshiaki, whom Forbes magazine has identified as the world's richest man.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Come Jan. 1, Japanese politicians will not be allowed to accept direct donations from the corporations that have bankrolled politics here for decades. Fearful of voters' wrath, Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, or LDP, has thought better about reneging on a 5-year-old promise to enact campaign financing reform.
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