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Japan Trade Asia

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BUSINESS
April 23, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Get real, America. The dollar's current decline is not merely Japan's problem or the work of fevered speculators, as many U.S. government officials and financial experts have said. Rather it represents a historic shift in the world economy, with Asian countries moving away from U.S. influence to do more business among themselves and with Japan. And that could prove a blessing or a curse for U.S. business and the economy into the next century, depending on how U.S.
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NEWS
November 29, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring the region's economic crisis over, leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations agreed Sunday to increase cooperation with Japan, China and South Korea and to accelerate moves toward the establishment of a common market, similar to the European Union.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drive by Japanese corporations to export more to make up for a sluggish domestic economy pushed Japan's trade surplus to $10.2 billion in February, a historic high for a single month, according to figures released Wednesday. The announcement by the Ministry of Finance quickly raised fears of worsening trade friction with the United States.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Get real, America. The dollar's current decline is not merely Japan's problem or the work of fevered speculators, as many U.S. government officials and financial experts have said. Rather it represents a historic shift in the world economy, with Asian countries moving away from U.S. influence to do more business among themselves and with Japan. And that could prove a blessing or a curse for U.S. business and the economy into the next century, depending on how U.S.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The Japanese government promised Tuesday to import more of its Asian neighbors' products and at the same time urged the United States to improve the quality of its products in an effort to become more competitive.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring the region's economic crisis over, leaders of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations agreed Sunday to increase cooperation with Japan, China and South Korea and to accelerate moves toward the establishment of a common market, similar to the European Union.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SAM JAMESON and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
Flexing its productive muscle after World War II, Japan became a "factory to the world." With the capital reserves it accumulated as it built up enormous trade surpluses, it became a "banker to the world." And now--in the most surprising development of all--Japan is taking the first steps toward yet another transformation into a "market to the world."
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost in the debate about the United States' trade deficit with Japan is a new cause for anxiety on this side of the Pacific: Japan is dominating the booming trade with Asian nations as well. For the first time, in the year that ended March 31, Asian nations ran up a bigger trade deficit with Tokyo ($55.95 billion) than did the United States ($51.14 billion). "In 1985 . . . Japan exported a third more to the United States than it did to Asia," noted a study by Deutsche Bank Capital Markets.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | DATAQUEST, DATAQUEST is a market-intelligence firm based in San Jose
The $6-billion market for computer workstations is one of the fastest-growing segments in the industry, with projections showing a compound annual growth rate of 30% in five years. Between personal computers and mini-super computers in terms of power, workstations are fast becoming the upgrade of choice among PC users. And in the next few years, as workstations come down in price and PCs increase in performance, the line between them will become more blurry.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The announcement this week that Japan would give birth to a banking Goliath was electrifying to the nation's debt-strapped banking community, but analysts believe its greater long-term effect may be to position Japan as the leading regional center for Asian trade.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost in the debate about the United States' trade deficit with Japan is a new cause for anxiety on this side of the Pacific: Japan is dominating the booming trade with Asian nations as well. For the first time, in the year that ended March 31, Asian nations ran up a bigger trade deficit with Tokyo ($55.95 billion) than did the United States ($51.14 billion). "In 1985 . . . Japan exported a third more to the United States than it did to Asia," noted a study by Deutsche Bank Capital Markets.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A drive by Japanese corporations to export more to make up for a sluggish domestic economy pushed Japan's trade surplus to $10.2 billion in February, a historic high for a single month, according to figures released Wednesday. The announcement by the Ministry of Finance quickly raised fears of worsening trade friction with the United States.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1990 | DATAQUEST, DATAQUEST is a market-intelligence firm based in San Jose
The $6-billion market for computer workstations is one of the fastest-growing segments in the industry, with projections showing a compound annual growth rate of 30% in five years. Between personal computers and mini-super computers in terms of power, workstations are fast becoming the upgrade of choice among PC users. And in the next few years, as workstations come down in price and PCs increase in performance, the line between them will become more blurry.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SAM JAMESON and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
Flexing its productive muscle after World War II, Japan became a "factory to the world." With the capital reserves it accumulated as it built up enormous trade surpluses, it became a "banker to the world." And now--in the most surprising development of all--Japan is taking the first steps toward yet another transformation into a "market to the world."
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The Japanese government promised Tuesday to import more of its Asian neighbors' products and at the same time urged the United States to improve the quality of its products in an effort to become more competitive.
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